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I am trying to connect and do simple functionalities such as search on an Active Directory using C#. However, I am stuck in a problem. I am using DirectorySearcher to search the directory. There are loads of entries in the directory.

This is the function

void RunThis()
{
        DirectoryEntry de = new DirectoryEntry();
        de.Path = "LDAP://" + domainName;
        de.Username = username;
        de.Password = password;
        de.AuthenticationType = AuthenticationTypes.Secure;

        DirectorySearcher deSearch = new DirectorySearcher(de);
        //Skipping properties to load
        try
        {
            deSearch.SearchScope = SearchScope.Subtree;
            SearchResultCollection rescoll = deSearch.FindAll();
            deSearch.Dispose();
            rescoll.Dispose();
        }
        catch (Exception obj)
        {
            System.Console.WriteLine("Exception in getting results. {0}",obj.Message);
        }

     }
     de.Dispose();

} // end of function 

This is a sample function I trimmed down to. I could find a lot of posts which said that calling dispose explicitly of the DirectorySearcher or ResultCollection object will solve the problem.

However, I see that the memory used by the task is increasing constantly. There isnt much else going in the other part of the code. When i comment the function, the memory usage becomes stable.

Has anyone else faced the issue and found a solution?

PS: And there is no way out. I need to do the findall :(

share|improve this question
    
What happens if you force a gargabe collection System.GC.Collect ();? Does memory stabilize? If so, then that indicates either some objects aren't being disposed, or that this is normal .net memory allocation on a sytem without memory pressure. (Frustrating, I know). – agent-j Jun 15 '11 at 18:22
    
are you hooking any event in the part of code you removed ? – Yochai Timmer Jun 15 '11 at 18:27
    
@Agent-j No luck! – Andy Jun 16 '11 at 17:21
    
@Yochai - No i didnt hook any event! The code given is very much the code. I am just calling this function from the main function! For testing right now i was calling in a for loop to see the effect. – Andy Jun 16 '11 at 17:23
    
Hi All, Just wanted to update.. I gave up all hope and switched to C++. Did it through that and didnt use DirectoryServices namespace. Used the winldap.h etc in place. – Andy Jun 16 '11 at 17:25

You aren't disposing everything if an exception is thrown: you need to use a try/finally block or the equivalent using statement, something like:

void RunThis()
{
    using (DirectoryEntry de = new DirectoryEntry())
    {
        de.Path = "LDAP://" + domainName;
        de.Username = username;
        de.Password = password;
        de.AuthenticationType = AuthenticationTypes.Secure;

        using (DirectorySearcher deSearch = new DirectorySearcher(de))
        {
            deSearch.SearchScope = SearchScope.Subtree;
            using (SearchResultCollection rescoll = deSearch.FindAll())
            {
            }
        }
    }

} // end of function 
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Joe! I tried that.. But using is not helping at all! – Andy Jun 15 '11 at 18:28
    
@Andy, in that case I suggest you post the real code. And/or try a minimal simplified version of the real code to see if you get the same problem. If you do, post the simplified version. If you don't, then start adding the real code back in bit by bit until it fails. – Joe Jun 15 '11 at 18:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The solution is here

Memory Leak when using DirectorySearcher.FindAll()

Some problem with the FindAll API implementation. If you dont enumerate the results and not use it once, then dispose wont work properly. However, after enumerating it and a simple enumerator.moveNext() done once, it disposes nice and clean. This has solved my problem.! :)

share|improve this answer

First, you need to figure out whether it is managed or unmanaged memory that is leaking.

  1. Use perfmon to see what happens to your process '.net memory# Bytes in all Heaps' and Process\Private Bytes. Compare the numbers and the memory rises. If the rise in Private bytes outpaces the rise in heap memory, then it's unmanaged memory growth.

  2. Unmanaged memory growth would point to objects that are not being disposed (but eventually collected when their finalizer executes).

  3. If it's managed memory growth, then we'll need to see which generation/LOH (there are also performance counters for each generation of heap bytes).

  4. If it's Large Object Heap bytes, you'll want to reconsider the use and throwing away of large byte arrays. Perhaps the byte arrays can be re-used instead of discarded. Also, consider allocating large byte arrays that are powers of 2. This way, when disposed, you'll leave a large "hole" in the large object heap that can be filled by another object of the same size.

  5. A final concern is pinned memory, but I don't have any advice for you on this because I haven't ever messed with it.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually the thing is, msdn accepts that using DirectoryServices.DirectorySearcher.FindAll will need to have the dispose function called explicitly or else it cant efficently release all the used resources. So i was expecting that dispose will solve the matter. But in my case it hasn't. – Andy Jun 16 '11 at 17:32
    
Do you know where memory is leaking? Are you sure it's managed code or unmanaged? – agent-j Jun 16 '11 at 17:50

DirectoryEntry and DirectorySearcher both implement IDisposable. Also, you need to insure that they are disposed even in the event of an exception. I would suggest placing the construction of both inside using blocks.

EDIT: As does SearchResultCollection, so +1 to @Joe.

share|improve this answer

Try using a using statement instead

void RunThis()
{
        using(DirectoryEntry de = new DirectoryEntry())
        {
          de.Path = "LDAP://" + domainName;
          de.Username = username;
          de.Password = password;
          de.AuthenticationType = AuthenticationTypes.Secure;

          DirectorySearcher deSearch = new DirectorySearcher(de);
          //Skipping properties to load
          try
          {
            deSearch.SearchScope = SearchScope.Subtree;
            SearchResultCollection rescoll = deSearch.FindAll();
            deSearch.Dispose();
            rescoll.Dispose();
          }
          catch (Exception obj)
          {
            System.Console.WriteLine("Exception in getting results. {0}",obj.Message);
          }
        }
}

This will not only dispose of the DirectoryEntry but will also clean up everything else in the using block for you.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a good idea, and even better if you implement it for 'deSearch` and resColl as well, since that is where memory can currently leak in the case of the caught exception. – Steve Townsend Jun 15 '11 at 18:23
    
I tried that.. That is not working! Sorry. – Andy Jun 15 '11 at 18:25
    
@Steve does using not dispose of all IDisposable inside the using block? – msarchet Jun 15 '11 at 18:28
    
Nope, it's only going to Dispose the object to which that using applies. Internally-created IDisposables need their own using as per @Joe's answer. – Steve Townsend Jun 15 '11 at 18:33

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