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I am trying to declare a integer variable m and a pointer to integer data type n.

int m,*n;
*n=2;
printf("%d",*n);

above code works fine. But

int *n,m;
*n=2;
printf("%d",*n);

gives segmentation fault.

please explain why?

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Neither one should work, you define a pointer, which doesn't point to anything then assign a value to it. –  Grady Player Jun 15 '11 at 18:59

5 Answers 5

Both versions are wrong—you just got lucky with the one that worked. You've declared a pointer but not allocated any storage for it. Try this:

int *n,m;
n=&m;
*n=2;
printf("%d",*n);

Or using malloc():

int *n;
n=malloc(sizeof(int));
*n=2;
printf("%d",*n);
free(n);
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Isn't this a problem of no initialization of n rather than lack of storage allocated to it? –  grok12 Jun 15 '11 at 19:52
    
@grok it's kind of the same thing. There has to be storage allocated whenever you have a pointer. –  David Heffernan Jun 15 '11 at 19:55
    
But his int *n does the allocation. Am I missing something? –  grok12 Jun 15 '11 at 20:38
1  
@grok that allocates a pointer. But you also need to allocate an int and then point the pointer at the int. –  David Heffernan Jun 15 '11 at 20:43

Both code segments invoke undefined behaviour, because you dereference an uninitialized pointer. When there is UB, nasal demons fly out of your nose... or your program orders pizza, or it crashes, or it works... You must alllocate memory first.

int* n = malloc(sizeof(int));
*n = 2;
free(n);

Or set it to an address of another object;;

int *n, m;
n = &m;
*n = 2;
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And for the OP's benefit, one way that undefined behavior can act is with a seg fault crash. Another way it can act is by not crashing. Anything goes with UB. –  Michael Burr Jun 15 '11 at 18:58

When you declare a pointer variable, it allocates some block of space in memory. This space already contains some data left over from whatever it was used for before this program. It gives a segmentation fault because whatever data is in the pointer refers to a memory location outside of your space on the hard drive. As Armen said, you have to initialize the pointer by telling it where to point. This will replace the data currently in the pointer with the address of your variable m (or wherever you want it to point).

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"This space already contains some data left over from whatever it was used for before this program." ...unless the variable is in static storage, in which case it's initialised with zeros. –  ikegami Jun 15 '11 at 19:09

n is uninitialized pointer. Access to it causes error.

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Accessing it is an error. It may or may not cause an error. –  ikegami Jun 15 '11 at 19:08

You are lucky the first one works at all. Both of them are accessing a non-initialized pointer.

What does "n" point to? Since it is uninitialized, it is pointing to nothing. In each case, you are assigning whatever n is pointing to the value of 2. The first will eventually lead to a nasty bug. You are lucky on the second one because it crashed right away.

Use malloc to create some memory for n to point to, and then assign it.

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If it is uninitialized, you just can't be sure what it points to. It could point to something, you never know! –  David Heffernan Jun 15 '11 at 18:59

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