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I get this weird error:

MyView:OnInitialUpdate()
{
    int* my_int;
    *(my_int) = 1;
    AfxBeginThread(MyThread,my_int);
}

UINT MyThread(LPVOID param)
{  
    int* my_int = reinterpret_cast<int*>(param);
    message(*(my_int));
        return 0;
}

void message(int value)
{
    CString txt;
    txt.Format(_T("%d"),value);
    AfxMessageBox(txt);
}

The message box output is 4250636.

Now if I just add another message box before passing the value to the thread:

MyView:OnInitialUpdate()
{
    int* my_int;
    *(my_int) = 1;
    message(*(my_int));
    AfxBeginThread(MyThread,my_int);
}

Both message box outputs are 1.

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1  
Does this actually compile? Is MyView a goto label or a class name? –  Kerrek SB Jun 15 '11 at 19:54
    
This is just a simplified example, but I guess others below found the reason of my problem. –  Smash Jun 15 '11 at 19:57
    
I bet there was a warning in the line *(my_int) = 1; –  frag Jun 15 '11 at 21:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
int* my_int;
*(my_int) = 1;

This is undefined behavior. You didn't initialize my_int, so you're dereferencing an invalid pointer.

Instead, create a member x in your MyView class, and change to:

int* my_int = &x;
share|improve this answer
    
So I should be doing: int a = 1; int* my_int = &a; ? –  Smash Jun 15 '11 at 19:56
    
@Smash: not exactly. a may not be a local variable, because it must live longer than the thread. –  ybungalobill Jun 15 '11 at 19:56
1  
Even better, just skip the pointers and pass in reinterpret_cast<LPVOID>(1) as the second argument of AfxBeginThread, and cast it back as usescanner = reinterpret_cast<int>(param) inside of MyThread. –  Adam Rosenfield Jun 15 '11 at 20:02
    
Ok thanks for both solutions –  Smash Jun 15 '11 at 20:12

This

int* my_int;

defines a pointer to some integer without initializing it with an actual integer's address, so it points at some random address in memory.
This

*(my_int) = 1;

then writes a value to this random address.

Officially, this invokes the dreaded Undefined Behavior. After that, all bets are off. Even if your computer would explode into your face as a result of that, your compiler would be standard-conforming.


However, there's more to this: Since you pass that pointer to some function which is to be executed asynchronously, you need to make sure that the object the pointer refers to is "alive" for as long as your other thread will try to access it. Basically, the only ways to do that would be to make it global, static, or dynamically allocated.
However, given your code I see no reason you need to pass an actual pointer anyway. Passing reinterpret_cast<LPVOID>(1) should do.

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The above both correct but another way of saying it:

*(my_int) = 1

means: set what my_int points to 1 - but my_int is not yet pointing to anything - boom.

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A pointer always points to something. It might not be something valid, though. –  sbi Jun 15 '11 at 20:00

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