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I've looked at some other answers here, but I'm not understanding how to do this. This is the best I'm coming up with.

To eliminate off-subject comments, i prefer grid over pack, and I also like the widget.configure way of doing things, so that exactly one logical thing is accomplished with each line of code.

towards the end of the code, i have self.root.update() I have also left off the self. with no luck.

from tkinter import *

class Application:
    def __init__(self, master):
        frame1 = Frame(master)
        frame1.grid(row=1, column=1)

        self.btnQuit = Button(frame1)
        self.btnQuit.configure(text="QUIT")
        self.btnQuit.configure(fg="red")
        self.btnQuit.configure(command=frame1.quit)
        self.btnQuit.grid(row=1, column=1)

        self.btnHi = Button(frame1)
        self.btnHi.configure(text="hi there")
        self.btnHi.configure(command="self.hello")
        self.btnHi.grid(row=2, column=1)

        self.lblMessage = Label(frame1)
        self.lblMessage.grid(row=2, column=2)

        def hello(self):
            self.lblMessage.configure(text="hello there")
            self.root.update()

root = Tk()
program = Application(root)
root.mainloop()
share|improve this question
    
I've given an answer based on some guesswork. But in general, nobody can really help you if they don't know what isn't working (or working different from your expectation) in detail. What happens, what do you want to happen, if there's an error what is the exact and complete message, etc. - that kind of thing. You don't call customer service and simply state "Fix my thingy", do you? –  delnan Jun 15 '11 at 20:02
1  
One of the first rules of debugging event-based functions is to make sure the function you're trying to fix is actually being called. If you put a print statement inside your hello function it might tell you something you didn't know. –  Bryan Oakley Jun 15 '11 at 20:06
    
i added a print("in hello") as suggested. No output appeared in the console. –  Brad Jun 15 '11 at 20:48
    
as far as "fix my thingie"... I've been in technical service for a little over 14 years. Normally, the customer bring it in because they don't know what's broke. An example using c++ "my program doesn't work!" cout < "hello world"; –  Brad Jun 15 '11 at 20:49
    
so, did you learn something when you didn't see any output? That perhaps your function wasn't being called? No matter how many things you try haphazardly, none will work because your function was never being called. The point is, be methodical and start with the basics. Make sure the code you're trying to fix is even being called. If not, the first step is to figure out why it's not being called. –  Bryan Oakley Jun 16 '11 at 2:10

4 Answers 4

  1. You have to give the command option a callable object - not a string to be eval'd (which wouldn't work anyway since it'd be in a very different scope, e.g. with no/a different self). http://infohost.nmt.edu/tcc/help/pubs/tkinter/button.html seems to confirm this.
  2. The way your code is indented in your question, you define a local function hello inside __init__ instead of defining it at class level (as a method). You need to remove one level of indentation starting with def hello
share|improve this answer

As stated above:

self.btnHi.configure(command="self.hello")

should be:

self.btnHi.configure(command=self.hello)

and mind the indent of the lines. But also:

self.v = StringVar()
self.lblMessage = Label(frame1, textvariable=self.v)

In your hello method, use:

self.v.set("hello there")
share|improve this answer

Not clear to me what you are trying to do, but if you are trying to change the contents of a Label after it is created, then you need to use a StringVar() object. Setting that to the Label's textvariable parameter (in its constructor) will mean that the Label updates whenever you update the value of the StringVar (using its set() method).

share|improve this answer
    
You do not need to use a StringVar -- it's possible to change the label using its configure method. Using an instance of StringVar is a way to solve the problem, but not the only way to solve it. –  Bryan Oakley May 21 '12 at 13:35

Please try this:

from tkinter import *

    class Application:
        def __init__(self, master):
            frame1 = Frame(master)
            frame1.grid(row=1, column=1)

            self.btnQuit = Button(frame1)
            self.btnQuit.configure(text="QUIT")
            self.btnQuit.configure(fg="red")
            self.btnQuit.configure(command=frame1.quit)
            self.btnQuit.grid(row=1, column=1)

            self.btnHi = Button(frame1)
            self.btnHi.configure(text="hi there")
            self.btnHi.configure(command=self.hello)
            self.btnHi.grid(row=2, column=1)

            self.lblMessage = Label(frame1)
            self.lblMessage.grid(row=2, column=2)

        def hello(self):
            self.lblMessage.configure(text="hello there")
            self.root.update()

    root = Tk()`enter code here`
    program = Application(root)
    root.mainloop()
share|improve this answer
    
There's no need to call update in the hello function. –  Bryan Oakley Jan 1 at 15:46

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