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I would like your help on trimming a file by removing the columns with the same value.

# the file I have (tab-delimited, millions of columns)
jack 1 5 9
john 3 5 0
lisa 4 5 7

# the file I want (remove the columns with the same value in all lines)
jack 1 9
john 3 0
lisa 4 7

Could you please give me any directions on this problem? I prefer a sed or awk solution, or maybe a perl solution.

Thanks in advance. Best,

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1  
So you want to remove a column if, and only if, it never changes throughout the entire file? And you don't know which columns those are in advance? –  Christopher Bibbs Jun 15 '11 at 20:04
    
Do you mean actual millions, or is that just a figure of speech? Because checking over 1,000,000 colums, in an unspecified number of rows for identical values would be a very challenging task. –  TLP Jun 15 '11 at 20:06
    
Dear Christopher, yes, I don't know which columns in advance. –  jianfeng.mao Jun 15 '11 at 20:41
1  
Are you sure, if there is such column out in millions of record? –  ssapkota Jun 15 '11 at 21:13
1  
a file with millions of columns does not feel like a good design. Perhaps you should start to think about other approaches? What are you building? –  Fredrik Pihl Jun 15 '11 at 21:37
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8 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
#!/usr/bin/perl
$/="\t";
open(R,"<","/tmp/filename") || die;
while (<R>)
{
  next if (($. % 4) == 3);
  print;
}

Well, this was assuming it was the third column. If it is by value:

#!/usr/bin/perl
$/="\t";
open(R,"<","/tmp/filename") || die;
while (<R>)
{
  next if (($_ == 5);
  print;
}

With the question edit, OP's desires become clear. How about:

#!/usr/bin/perl
open(R,"<","/tmp/filename") || die;
my $first = 1;
my (@cols);
while (<R>)
{
  my (@this) = split(/\t/);
  if ($. == 1)
  {
    @cols = @this;
  }
  else
  {
    for(my $x=0;$x<=$#cols;$x++)
    {
      if (defined($cols[$x]) && !($cols[$x] ~~ $this[$x]))
      {
        $cols[$x] = undef;
      }
    }
  }
  next if (($_ == 5));
#  print;
}
close(R);
my(@del);
print "Deleting columns: ";
for(my $x=0;$x<=$#cols;$x++)
{
  if (defined($cols[$x]))
  {
    print "$x ($cols[$x]), ";
    push(@del,$x-int(@del));
  }
}
print "\n";

open(R,"<","/tmp/filename") || die;
while (<R>)
{
  chomp;
  my (@this) = split(/\t/);

  foreach my $col (@del)
  {
    splice(@this,$col,1);
  }

  print join("\t",@this)."\n";
}
close(R);
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And if the value is not 5? He did say "millions" of columns. –  TLP Jun 15 '11 at 20:08
1  
Before he/someone formatted the question, the question could be interpreted quite differently. In the new layout and a new clarification of the question, it requires multiple passes and much pain. –  Seth Robertson Jun 15 '11 at 20:25
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Here's a quick perl script to figure out which columns can be cut.

open FH, "file" or die $!;
my @baseline = split /\t/,<FH>;         #snag the first row
my @linemap = 0..$#baseline;            #list all equivalent columns (all of them)

while(<FH>) {                           #loop over the file
    my @line = split /\t/;
    @linemap = grep {$baseline[$_] eq $line[$_]}  @linemap; #filter out any that aren't equal
}
print join " ", @linemap;
print "\n";

You can use many of the above recommendations to actually remove the columns. My favorite would probably the cut implementation, partly because the above perl script could be modified to give you the precise command (or even run it for you).

@linemap = map {$_+1} @linemap;                   #Cut is 1-index based
print "cut --complement -f ".join(",",@linemap)." file\n";
share|improve this answer
    
I wrote a quick sample file with 2M columns, starting out with the first few lines the same, and decreasing linearly until only 10% of the file matched. It seems to take about 1.3 seconds/line on my not terribly powerful desktop for the first few lines, quickly decreasing as the @linemap array shrinks. –  jkerian Jun 15 '11 at 21:32
    
I also did a bit of experimenting with cutting the columns, using the cut utility is orders of magnitude faster than doing the filtering in perl (even when you require multiple passes) –  jkerian Jun 15 '11 at 21:57
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If you know which column to strip out in advance then cut will be helpful:

cut --complement -d' ' -f 3 filename
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As I understand you want to go through each line and check if values in some column have no variance, and then i that case you can remove that column. If that is the case I have a suggestion, but not ready made script, but I think you'll be able to figure it out. You should look at cut. It extracts parts of line. You can use it to extract i.e. column one, then run uniq on outputted data, and then if after unique theres only one value, it means all values in that column are identical. This way you can collect numbers of columns that have no variance. You will need shell script to see how many columns you file has(i guess using head -n 1 and counting number of delimiters) and run such procedure on every column, storing column numbers in array, then in the end crafting cut line to remove columns that are of no interest. Granted its not awk or perl but should work, and would use only traditional Unix tools. Well you can use them in perl script if you want :)

Well and i if misunderstood the question maybe cut will still be useful:) it seems to be one of lesser known tools.

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As far as I can tell, you'll need to make this a multi-pass program to meet your needs without blowing through memory. For starters, load a single line of the file into an array.

open FH,'datafile.txt' or die "$!";
my @mask;
my @first_line= split(/\s+/,<FH>);

Then you'll want to sequentially read in the other lines

while(my @next_line= split(/\s+/,<FH>)) {
/* compare each member of @first_line to @next_line
 * any match, make a mark in mask to true
 */

When you get to the bottom of the file, go back to the top and use mask to determine which colums to print.

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You can select the column to cut out like

# using bash/awk
# I had used 1000000 here, as you had written millions of columns but you should adjust it
for cols in `seq 2 1000000` ; do
    cut -d DELIMITER -f $cols FILE | awk -v c=$cols '{s+=$0} END {if (s/NR==$0) {printf("%i,",c)}}'
done | sed 's/,$//' > tmplist
cut --complement -d DELIMITER -f `cat tmplist` FILE

But it can be REALLY slow, because it's not optimized, and reads the file several times... so be careful with huge files.

Or you can read the whole file once with awk and select the dumpable columns, then use cut.

cut --complement -d DELIMITER -f `awk '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {sums[i]+=$i}} END {for (i=1;i<=NF; i++) {if (sums[i]/NR==$i) {printf("%i,",c)}}}' FILE | sed 's/,$//'` FILE

HTH

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Not fully tested but this seems to work for the provided test set, note that it destroys the original file...

#!/bin/bash

#change 4 below to match number of columns
for i in {2..4}; do
    cut -f $i input | sort | uniq -c > tmp
    while read a b; do
        if [ $a -ge 2 ]; then
            awk -vfield=$i '{$field="_";print}' input > tmp2
            $(mv tmp2 input)
        fi
    done < tmp
done

$ cat input
jack    1   5   9
john    3   5   0
lisa    4   5   7

$ ./cnt.sh 

$ cat input
jack 1 _ 9
john 3 _ 0
lisa 4 _ 7

Using _ to make the output clearer...

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The main problem here is that you said "millions of columns", and did not specify how many rows. In order to check each value in each row against its counterpart in every other column.. you are looking at a great many checks.

Granted, you would be able to reduce the number of columns as you go, but you would still need to check each one down to the last row. So... much processing.

We can make a "seed" hash to start off with from the two first lines:

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $fh, '<', "inputfile.txt" or die;
my %matches;
my $line = <$fh>;
my $nextline = <$fh>;
my $i=0;
while ($line =~ s/\t(\d+)//) {
    my $num1 = $1;
    if ($nextline =~ s/\t(\d+)//) {
       if ($1 == $num1) { $matches{$i} = $num1 }
    } else {
       die "Mismatched line at line $.";
    }
    $i++;
}

Then with this "seed" hash, you could read the rest of the lines, and remove non-matching values from the hash, such as:

while($line = <$fh>) {
    my $i = 0;
    while ($line =~ s/\t(\d+)//) {
        if (defined $matches{$i}) {
            $matches{$i} = undef if ($matches{$i} != $1);
        }
        $i++;
    }
}

One could imagine a solution where one stripped away all the rows which were already proven to be unique, but in order to do that, you need to make an array of the row, or make a regex, and I am not sure that would not take equally long as simply passing through the string.

Then, after processing all the rows, you would have a hash with the values of duplicated numbers, so you could re-open the file, and do your print:

open my $fh, '<', "inputfile.txt" or die;
open my $outfile, '>', "outfile.txt" or die;
while ($line = <$fh>) {
    my $i = 0;
    if ($line =~ s/^([^\t]+)(?=\t)//) {
        print $outfile $1;
    } else { warn "Missing header at line $.\n"; }
    while ($line =~ s/(\t\d+)//) {
        if (defined $matches{$i}) { print $1 }
        $i++;
    }
    print "\n";
}

This is a rather heavy operation, and this code is untested. This will give you a hint to a solution, it will probably take a while to process the whole file. I suggest running some tests to see if it works with your data, and tweak it.

If you only have a few matching columns, it is much easier to simply extract them from the line, but I hesitate to use split on such long lines. Something like:

while ($line = <$fh>) {
    my @line = split /\t/, $line;
    for my $key (sort { $b <=> $a } keys %matches) {
        splice @line, $key + 1, 1;
    }
    $line = join ("\t", @line);
    $line =~ s/\n*$/\n/; # awkward way to make sure to get a single newline
    print $outfile $line;
}

Note that we would have to sort the keys in descending numerical order, so that we trim values from the end. Otherwise we screw up the uniqueness of the subsequent array numbers.

Anyway, it might be one way to go. It's a rather large operation, though. I'd keep backups. ;)

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