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I have a method with a for() loop. In that loop, mylabel.text is updated many times. However, the actual label does not update on the screen until the method is done, updating with the last value created in the for() loop.

Using an NSLog, which does update in the middle of the for() loop, I see the value indeed changing for the label many times.

Is it the general practice in iOS to not update labels in the middle of the for() loop? I would imagine there is a way to do this.

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How do you update the UILabel's value? –  Saphrosit Jun 15 '11 at 20:23
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This has come up a few times: stackoverflow.com/questions/5829977/… –  Steven Kramer Jun 15 '11 at 20:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can make the UI update by telling the run loop to run like this:

for (NSInteger i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    [label setText:...];
    [[NSRunLoop currentRunLoop] runMode:NSDefaultRunLoopMode beforeDate:[NSDate distantPast]];
}
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Yes, the run loop is already running, but telling it to run like in the example above will process the input sources, including UI updates. –  Morten Fast Jun 15 '11 at 20:37
    
very nifty trick indeed. i can't help but feel like there is some danger in manipulating the runloop, but it is indeed working, thanks. –  OpenLearner Jun 15 '11 at 21:08
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Note that this can have all kinds of bizarre side-effects. When you call runMode:beforeDate:, all kinds of things could happen in the middle of your loop. Timers could fire; WebKit can do all kinds of madness; delayed selectors can fire. This is a very dangerous trick. Sometimes useful, occasionally necessary (especially on Mac), but not a general-purpose tool. –  Rob Napier May 2 '12 at 13:06

From my earlier comment:

Note that this (runMode:beforeDate:) can have all kinds of bizarre side-effects. When you call runMode:beforeDate:, all kinds of things could happen in the middle of your loop. Timers could fire; WebKit can do all kinds of madness; delayed selectors can fire. This is a very dangerous trick. Sometimes useful, occasionally necessary (especially on Mac), but not a general-purpose tool.

The better solution is to schedule your updates on the main dispatch queue:

  for (NSInteger i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    dispatch_after(dispatch_time(DISPATCH_TIME_NOW, i * NSEC_PER_SEC), 
                   dispatch_get_main_queue(), ^{
      [self.label setText:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", i]];
    });
  }

This schedules 10 updates 1 second apart. It can be adapted to all kinds of other requirements without creating a blocking method on the main run loop.

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try

[yourLabel setNeedsDisplay];
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Not quite. -setNeedsDisplay schedules a view to be updated in a subsequent run loop—it doesn't trigger a re-draw immediately. –  Wilbur Vandrsmith Jun 15 '11 at 20:31

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