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I need to search a WPF control hierarchy for controls that match a given name or type. How can I do this?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 158 down vote accepted

I combined the template format used by John Myczek and Tri Q's algorithm above to create a findChild Algorithm that can be used on any parent. Keep in mind that recursively searching a tree downwards could be a lengthy process. I've only spot-checked this on a WPF application, please comment on any errors you might find and I'll correct my code.

WPF Snoop is a useful tool in looking at the visual tree - I'd strongly recommend using it while testing or using this algorithm to check your work.

There is a small error in Tri Q's Algorithm. After the child is found, if childrenCount is > 1 and we iterate again we can overwrite the properly found child. Therefore I added a if (foundChild != null) break; into my code to deal with this condition.

/// <summary>
/// Finds a Child of a given item in the visual tree. 
/// </summary>
/// <param name="parent">A direct parent of the queried item.</param>
/// <typeparam name="T">The type of the queried item.</typeparam>
/// <param name="childName">x:Name or Name of child. </param>
/// <returns>The first parent item that matches the submitted type parameter. 
/// If not matching item can be found, 
/// a null parent is being returned.</returns>
public static T FindChild<T>(DependencyObject parent, string childName)
   where T : DependencyObject
{    
  // Confirm parent and childName are valid. 
  if (parent == null) return null;

  T foundChild = null;

  int childrenCount = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(parent);
  for (int i = 0; i < childrenCount; i++)
  {
    var child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(parent, i);
    // If the child is not of the request child type child
    T childType = child as T;
    if (childType == null)
    {
      // recursively drill down the tree
      foundChild = FindChild<T>(child, childName);

      // If the child is found, break so we do not overwrite the found child. 
      if (foundChild != null) break;
    }
    else if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(childName))
    {
      var frameworkElement = child as FrameworkElement;
      // If the child's name is set for search
      if (frameworkElement != null && frameworkElement.Name == childName)
      {
        // if the child's name is of the request name
        foundChild = (T)child;
        break;
      }
    }
    else
    {
      // child element found.
      foundChild = (T)child;
      break;
    }
  }

  return foundChild;
}

Call it like this:

TextBox foundTextBox = 
   UIHelper.FindChild<TextBox>(Application.Current.MainWindow, "myTextBoxName");

Note Application.Current.MainWindow can be any parent window.

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@CrimsonX: Maybe I'm doing this wrong... I had a similar need where I needed to get to a control (ListBox) inside a ContentControl (Expander). The above code didn't work for me as is.. I had to update the above code to see if a leaf node (GetChildrenCount => 0) is a ContentControl. If yes, check if the content matches the name+type criteria. –  Gishu Mar 24 '10 at 2:36
    
@Gishu - I think it should work for this purpose. Can you copy & paste your code to show how you're using the call? I would expect it should be FindChild<ListBox>(Expander myExpanderName, "myListBoxName"). –  CrimsonX Mar 24 '10 at 15:38
    
@CrimsonX: FindChild<ListBox>( topLevelUserControl, "myListBoxName") & topLevelUserControl > DockPanel > StackPanel > Expander > ListBox The recursion would stop at the Expander ; since GetChildrenCount() would return 0. –  Gishu Mar 25 '10 at 2:36
1  
@CrimsonX I think I found another corner case. I was trying to find the PART_SubmenuPlaceholder in the RibbonApplicationMenuItem, but the code above was not working. To resolve it, I needed to add the following: if (name == ElementName) else { foundChild = FindChild(child, name) if (foundChild != null) break; } –  daub815 May 29 '12 at 15:56
1  
Please be carefull, there is a bug or more in the answer. It will stop as soon as it will reach a child of the searched type. I think you should consider/prioritize other answers. –  Eric Ouellet Feb 6 at 16:26

You can use the VisualTreeHelper to find controls. Below is a method that uses the VisualTreeHelper to find a parent control of a specified type. You can use the VisualTreeHelper to find controls in other ways as well.

public static class UIHelper
{
   /// <summary>
   /// Finds a parent of a given item on the visual tree.
   /// </summary>
   /// <typeparam name="T">The type of the queried item.</typeparam>
   /// <param name="child">A direct or indirect child of the queried item.</param>
   /// <returns>The first parent item that matches the submitted type parameter. 
   /// If not matching item can be found, a null reference is being returned.</returns>
   public static T FindVisualParent<T>(DependencyObject child)
     where T : DependencyObject
   {
      // get parent item
      DependencyObject parentObject = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(child);

      // we’ve reached the end of the tree
      if (parentObject == null) return null;

      // check if the parent matches the type we’re looking for
      T parent = parentObject as T;
      if (parent != null)
      {
         return parent;
      }
      else
      {
         // use recursion to proceed with next level
         return FindVisualParent<T>(parentObject);
      }
   }
}

Call it like this:

Window owner = UIHelper.FindVisualParent<Window>(myControl);
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You can also find an element by name using FrameworkElement.FindName(string).

Given:

<UserControl ...>
    <TextBlock x:Name="myTextBlock" />
</UserControl>

In the code-behind file, you could write:

var myTextBlock = (TextBlock)this.FindName("myTextBlock");

Of course, because it's defined using x:Name, you could just reference the generated field, but perhaps you want to look it up dynamically rather than statically.

This approach is also available for templates, in which the named item appears multiple times (once per usage of the template).

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1  
For this to work you don't necessarily have to add the "x:" to the name attribute. –  brian buck Jul 19 '11 at 22:12

I may be just repeating everyone else but I do have a pretty piece of code that extends the DependencyObject class with a method FindChild() that will get you the child by type and name. Just include and use.

public static class UIChildFinder
{
    public static DependencyObject FindChild(this DependencyObject reference, string childName, Type childType)
    {
        DependencyObject foundChild = null;
        if (reference != null)
        {
            int childrenCount = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(reference);
            for (int i = 0; i < childrenCount; i++)
            {
                var child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(reference, i);
                // If the child is not of the request child type child
                if (child.GetType() != childType)
                {
                    // recursively drill down the tree
                    foundChild = FindChild(child, childName, childType);
                }
                else if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(childName))
                {
                    var frameworkElement = child as FrameworkElement;
                    // If the child's name is set for search
                    if (frameworkElement != null && frameworkElement.Name == childName)
                    {
                        // if the child's name is of the request name
                        foundChild = child;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    // child element found.
                    foundChild = child;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        return foundChild;
    }
}

Hope you find it useful.

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Per my post above, there is a small implementation error in your code: stackoverflow.com/questions/636383/wpf-ways-to-find-controls/… –  CrimsonX Nov 19 '09 at 2:13

My extensions to the code.

  • Added overloads to find one child by type, by type and criteria (predicate), find all children of type which meet the criteria
  • the FindChildren method is an iterator in addition to being an extension method for DependencyObject
  • FindChildren walks logical sub-trees also. See Josh Smith's post linked in the blog post.

Source: http://code.google.com/p/gishu-util/source/browse/trunk/WPF/Utilities/DepObjExtn.cs

Explanatory blog post : http://madcoderspeak.blogspot.com/2010/04/wpf-find-child-control-of-specific-type.html

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-1 Exactly what I was about to implement (predicate, iterator, and extension method), but there's a 404 on the source link. Will change to +1 if code is included here, or source link is fixed! –  cod3monk3y Jul 19 at 19:41
    
@cod3monk3y - Git migration killed the link it seems :) Here you go.. code.google.com/p/gishu-util/source/browse/… –  Gishu Jul 21 at 10:06

I edited CrimsonX's code as it was not working with superclass types:

public static T FindChild<T>(DependencyObject depObj, string childName)
   where T : DependencyObject
{
    // Confirm obj is valid. 
    if (depObj == null) return null;

    // success case
    if (depObj is T && ((FrameworkElement)depObj).Name == childName)
        return depObj as T;

    for (int i = 0; i < VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(depObj); i++)
    {
        DependencyObject child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(depObj, i);

        //DFS
        T obj = FindChild<T>(child, childName);

        if (obj != null)
            return obj;
    }

    return null;
}
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This will dismiss some elements - you should extend it like this in order to support a wider array of controls. For a brief discussion, have a look here

 /// <summary>
 /// Helper methods for UI-related tasks.
 /// </summary>
 public static class UIHelper
 {
   /// <summary>
   /// Finds a parent of a given item on the visual tree.
   /// </summary>
   /// <typeparam name="T">The type of the queried item.</typeparam>
   /// <param name="child">A direct or indirect child of the
   /// queried item.</param>
   /// <returns>The first parent item that matches the submitted
   /// type parameter. If not matching item can be found, a null
   /// reference is being returned.</returns>
   public static T TryFindParent<T>(DependencyObject child)
     where T : DependencyObject
   {
     //get parent item
     DependencyObject parentObject = GetParentObject(child);

     //we've reached the end of the tree
     if (parentObject == null) return null;

     //check if the parent matches the type we're looking for
     T parent = parentObject as T;
     if (parent != null)
     {
       return parent;
     }
     else
     {
       //use recursion to proceed with next level
       return TryFindParent<T>(parentObject);
     }
   }

   /// <summary>
   /// This method is an alternative to WPF's
   /// <see cref="VisualTreeHelper.GetParent"/> method, which also
   /// supports content elements. Do note, that for content element,
   /// this method falls back to the logical tree of the element!
   /// </summary>
   /// <param name="child">The item to be processed.</param>
   /// <returns>The submitted item's parent, if available. Otherwise
   /// null.</returns>
   public static DependencyObject GetParentObject(DependencyObject child)
   {
     if (child == null) return null;
     ContentElement contentElement = child as ContentElement;

     if (contentElement != null)
     {
       DependencyObject parent = ContentOperations.GetParent(contentElement);
       if (parent != null) return parent;

       FrameworkContentElement fce = contentElement as FrameworkContentElement;
       return fce != null ? fce.Parent : null;
     }

     //if it's not a ContentElement, rely on VisualTreeHelper
     return VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(child);
   }
}
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3  
By convention, I would expect any Try* method to return bool and have an out parameter that returns the type in question, as with: bool IDictionary.TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value) –  Drew Noakes Sep 25 '09 at 12:51
    
@DrewNoakes what do you suggest Philipp to call it, then? Also, even with such an expectation I find his code both clear and clear to use. –  ANeves Sep 15 at 19:13
    
@ANeves, in this case I would just call it FindParent. This name to me implies that it could return null. The Try* prefix is used throughout the BCL in the way I describe above. Also note that most of the other answers here use the Find* naming convention. It's only a minor point though :) –  Drew Noakes Sep 16 at 11:07

Whilst I love recursion in general, it's not as efficient as iteration when programming in C#, so perhaps the following solution is neater than the one suggested by John Myczek above?

public static T FindVisualAncestorOfType<T>(this DependencyObject Elt)
    where T : DependencyObject
{
    for (DependencyObject parent = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(Elt);
        parent != null; parent = VisualTreeHelper.GetParent(parent))
    {
        T result = parent as T;
        if (result != null)
            return result;
    }
    return null;
}
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If you want to find ALL controls of a specific type, you might be interested in this snippet too

    public static IEnumerable<T> FindVisualChildren<T>(DependencyObject parent) 
        where T : DependencyObject
    {
        List<T> foundChilds = new List<T>();

        int childrenCount = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(parent);
        for (int i = 0; i < childrenCount; i++)
        {
            var child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(parent, i);

            T childType = child as T;
            if (childType == null)
            {
                foreach(var other in FindVisualChildren<T>(child))
                    yield return other;
            }
            else
            {
                yield return (T)child;
            }
        }
    }
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Good one but ensure control is loaded otherwise GetChildrenCount will return 0. –  Klaus Nji May 30 '12 at 21:09

Here's my code to find controls by Type while controlling how deep we go into the hierarchy (maxDepth == 0 means infinitely deep).

public static class FrameworkElementExtension
{
    public static object[] FindControls(
        this FrameworkElement f, Type childType, int maxDepth)
    {
        return RecursiveFindControls(f, childType, 1, maxDepth);
    }

    private static object[] RecursiveFindControls(
        object o, Type childType, int depth, int maxDepth = 0)
    {
        List<object> list = new List<object>();
        var attrs = o.GetType()
            .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(ContentPropertyAttribute), true);
        if (attrs != null && attrs.Length > 0)
        {
            string childrenProperty = (attrs[0] as ContentPropertyAttribute).Name;
            foreach (var c in (IEnumerable)o.GetType()
                .GetProperty(childrenProperty).GetValue(o, null))
            {
                if (c.GetType().FullName == childType.FullName)
                    list.Add(c);
                if (maxDepth == 0 || depth < maxDepth)
                    list.AddRange(RecursiveFindControls(
                        c, childType, depth + 1, maxDepth));
            }
        }
        return list.ToArray();
    }
}
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exciton80... I was having a problem with your code not recursing through usercontrols. It was hitting the Grid root and throwing an error. I believe this fixes it for me:

public static object[] FindControls(this FrameworkElement f, Type childType, int maxDepth)
{
    return RecursiveFindControls(f, childType, 1, maxDepth);
}

private static object[] RecursiveFindControls(object o, Type childType, int depth, int maxDepth = 0)
{
    List<object> list = new List<object>();
    var attrs = o.GetType().GetCustomAttributes(typeof(ContentPropertyAttribute), true);
    if (attrs != null && attrs.Length > 0)
    {
        string childrenProperty = (attrs[0] as ContentPropertyAttribute).Name;
        if (String.Equals(childrenProperty, "Content") || String.Equals(childrenProperty, "Children"))
        {
            var collection = o.GetType().GetProperty(childrenProperty).GetValue(o, null);
            if (collection is System.Windows.Controls.UIElementCollection) // snelson 6/6/11
            {
                foreach (var c in (IEnumerable)collection)
                {
                    if (c.GetType().FullName == childType.FullName)
                        list.Add(c);
                    if (maxDepth == 0 || depth < maxDepth)
                        list.AddRange(RecursiveFindControls(
                            c, childType, depth + 1, maxDepth));
                }
            }
            else if (collection != null && collection.GetType().BaseType.Name == "Panel") // snelson 6/6/11; added because was skipping control (e.g., System.Windows.Controls.Grid)
            {
                if (maxDepth == 0 || depth < maxDepth)
                    list.AddRange(RecursiveFindControls(
                        collection, childType, depth + 1, maxDepth));
            }
        }
    }
    return list.ToArray();
}
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Since the question is general enough that it might attract people looking for answers to very trivial cases: if you just want a child rather than a descendant, you can use Linq:

private void ItemsControlItem_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    if (SomeCondition())
    {
        var children = (sender as Panel).Children;
        var child = (from Control child in children
                 where child.Name == "NameTextBox"
                 select child).First();
        child.Focus();
    }
}

or of course the obvious for loop iterating over Children.

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To complete @Gishu post : VisualTreeHelper does not work with ContentElement objects because ContentElement does not derive from Visual or Visual3D.

I suggest this links :

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I have a sequence function like this (which is completely general):

    public static IEnumerable<T> SelectAllRecursively<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, IEnumerable<T>> func)
    {
        return (items ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>()).SelectMany(o => new[] { o }.Concat(SelectAllRecursively(func(o), func)));
    }

Getting immediate children:

    public static IEnumerable<DependencyObject> FindChildren(this DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return Enumerable.Range(0, VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(obj))
            .Select(i => VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(obj, i));
    }

Finding all children down the hiararchical tree:

    public static IEnumerable<DependencyObject> FindAllChildren(this DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return obj.FindChildren().SelectAllRecursively(o => o.FindChildren());
    }

You can call this on the Window to get all controls.

After you have the collection, you can use LINQ (i.e. OfType, Where).

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