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public class MyClass
{
    public string myString;

    public MyClass(string s)
    {
        this.myString = s;
    }
}

In IEnumerable<MyClass> how can I change the default value of FirstOrDefault() method
For example I want to return new MyClass("HelloWorld");

Edit: Is there a way to override default value of a Class?
Like Default Value of MyClass is new MyClass("Default");

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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't directly change it. But you have a few alternatives.

If your sequence contains no nulls you can use:

MyClass result = seq.FirstOrDefault() ?? new MyClass("HelloWorld");

Or you can implement your own version which takes a parameter for the default value:

    public static T FirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T defaultValue)
    {
        using (IEnumerator<T> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            if (enumerator.MoveNext())
                return enumerator.Current;
            else
                return defaultValue;
        }
    }

    public static T FirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, bool> predicate, T defaultValue)
    {
        using (IEnumerator<T> enumerator = source.Where(predicate).GetEnumerator())
        {
            if (enumerator.MoveNext())
                return enumerator.Current;
            else
                return defaultValue;
        }
    }

You could also use a different name for your this implementation of FirstOrDefault, but since it doesn't collide with any of the existing overloads, I just used the same name.

https://github.com/CodesInChaos/ChaosUtil/blob/master/Chaos.Util/LinqExtensions.cs

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what is the meaning of Default why it's name is not FirstOrNull? –  Navid Rahmani Jun 15 '11 at 22:11
    
Because on non nullable types default(T) is not null. For example default(int) is 0 not null. The library I posted has a FirstOrNull method that you can use on non nullable value types. –  CodesInChaos Jun 15 '11 at 22:11
    
@Navid the default for value types is not null and hence it's not called FirstOrNull() –  Bala R Jun 15 '11 at 22:13
    
@CodeInChaos: Don't forget to dispose the enumerator. –  dtb Jun 15 '11 at 22:13
    
@dtb thanks, I just noticed that when looking at your answer. –  CodesInChaos Jun 15 '11 at 22:15

As an equivalent alternative to CodeAsChaos's good answer, you could also do the somewhat shorter:

public static T MyFirstOrDefault<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> sequence, 
    T myDefault)
{
    foreach(T item in sequence)
        return item;
    return myDefault;
}

public static T MyFirstOrDefault<T>(
    this IEnumerable<T> sequence, 
    Func<T, bool> predicate, 
    T myDefault)
{
    return sequence.Where(predicate).MyFirstOrDefault(myDefault);
}
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You could define an extension method like this:

public static T FirstOrDefault<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, T defaultValue)
{
    foreach (T x in source)
    {
        return x;
    }
    return defaultValue;
}
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Using a foreach that will only ever run once is a bit strange. But leads to much shorter code that what I wrote (and harder to get the disposing wrong) –  CodesInChaos Jun 15 '11 at 22:22

I'm going to instead of using generics, just tie it to an enumerable of your class:

public static MyClass FirstOrDefault(this IEnumerable<MyClass> source)
{
    foreach (var x in source)
    {
        return x;
    }
    return new MyClass("hello world"); 
    //OR, could be made a bit nicer by making a static method in your class
    return MyClass.Default();
}

This will do what you want, but only for your class. If this is acceptable, then this is by far the easiest and shortest way of doing it.

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downvotes for not using generics? ok :P –  Earlz Jun 15 '11 at 22:23
    
No. You're replacing the definition of a standard function with your own version that behaves subtly different. I don't want to maintain that code. So please give your function a different name. Edit: While I prefer generics, that's not why I dislike your answer. –  CodesInChaos Jun 15 '11 at 22:23
    
@CodeInChaos, but it's only for MyClass, so it's not too bad. The extension method could even be contained in MyClass so I'm not seeing too big of a deal. –  Earlz Jun 15 '11 at 22:25
    
Back to zero. other people reused the name FirstOrDefault (more genericly) with no downvotes.. –  John Gardner Jun 15 '11 at 22:32
    
I reused it with a different parameter signature and thus didn't change the meaning of the original FirstOrDefault extension method. You used the same signature and thus hide the original implementation behind a different implementation. So at the call site one would think that the original function gets called, but instead your differently behaving one gets called. –  CodesInChaos Jun 16 '11 at 6:57

Why don't just use DefaultIfEmtpy()?

For instance:

var result = this.MyClasses
    .Where(c => c.SomeCondition)
    .Select(c => c)
    .DefaultIfEmpty(new DefaultClass())
    .First();
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