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How do you allocate memory for an link list when passing its reference instead of its pointer?

For example:

struct node {
  string info;
  node *next;

};

void add(node &aNode){


//if I use
node *newNode;
newNode = new node;
aNode.next = newNode; //aNode.next = newNode; doesn't work either

//allocating on heap seems to give segmentation error.


}


int main() {                                                        

  node *aNode;
  aNode = new node;
  add (aNode);


}

Compiler error: error: invalid initialization of reference of type ‘node&’ from expr

alternatively if I use

int main() {                                                        

  node aNode;
  add (aNode);
  add (aNode);
  aNode.next->next->info = "abc";
  string a = aNode.next->next->info;


}

This give segmentation fault.

So is it possible to allocate for an linked list just with its reference? (this is C++)

share|improve this question
    
-1: Please at least attempt to provide some compilable C++! Your function argument has no type, and node newNode; newNode = new node; is not going to work, as newNode is not a pointer... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 15 '11 at 23:53
1  
I have already edited it before you typed your comment –  Mark Jun 15 '11 at 23:54
    
What's the question now? Oh, wait, your add signature is still bogus. –  Kerrek SB Jun 15 '11 at 23:56
2  
@Mark: If you're asking a question about (or closely related to) syntax, it's imperative that your question includes your actual code. Otherwise, we all end up arguing about irrelevancies, because it's difficult to see what the actual issue is.. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 16 '11 at 0:08
1  
Use std::list. Why do you reinvent wheel? :-) –  George Gaál Jun 16 '11 at 0:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your second variant of main(), you are calling add(aNode) twice. But you're providing it the same parameter each time. So although you're creating two new node objects, one of them is lost forever (a memory leak). And aNode.next ends up pointing to the other one. aNode.next->next is not a valid pointer, hence the seg-fault when you try to access something through it.

Depending on what you want to achieve, you could try this:

node aNode;
add(aNode);        // Basically does: aNode.next = new node;
add(*aNode.next);  // Basically does: aNode.next->next = new node;

There are better ways of doing linked-lists, but this would at least avoid the seg-fault.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm I seem to be misunderstanding reference. Because when I looked at the void swap(x, y) example the original variable x and y are changed. So shouldn't aNode be changed after the first call? –  Mark Jun 16 '11 at 0:37
    
@Mark: Yes, in your code, aNode will be changed after the first call. Specifically, aNode.next will now point at a valid node object. But after the second call, aNode will be changed again. Specifically, aNode.next will now point at a different valid node object. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 16 '11 at 0:41
    
Just a side question, is aNode store on stack? and is the node its pointing to stored on heap? If it's true then does that mean it's ok to use stack and heap together? –  Mark Jun 16 '11 at 1:22
    
@Mark: Yes, it's totally fine to use stack and heap together. It's all just memory. What you need to be careful of is accidentally invoking delete on a stack-based variable (more specifically, on a variable with "automatic" or "static" storage duration). Equally, you must always remember to invoke delete on a heap-based variable at some point. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 16 '11 at 7:33

It should be

node * newNode = new node;
aNode.next = newNode

You have to take care of deletion manually, e.g. check if aNode.next isn't already occupied (and delete if it is).

Further, the add function signature should read:

void add(node & aNode) { ... }

By the way, the STL comes with a nice <forward_list> ;-)


It's hard to tell what you're actually asking, but going by the question title perhaps you have in mind a node structure like this:

struct Node {
  Node & next;
  /* payload data */
  Node(Node & n) : next(n) /* ... */ { }
};

Such a node would store its successor "by reference"; but you would have to initialize it with an existing node! (There is no such thing as a "null" reference.) By the Poultry-Oval Impasse, you cannot do this.


Alright, while you continue to refuse to post your full code, here is my almost literal copy/paste of your code which works fine with me:

Update: I'm adding a feature to add a node at the end, which you might want.

#include <string>

struct node {
  std::string info;
  node *next;
  node(std::string i = "") : info(i), next(NULL) { }
};

void add(node &aNode)
{
  node *newNode;
  newNode = new node;
  aNode.next = newNode;
}

void add_at_end(node &aNode, std::string value = "")
{
  node *newNode, *n = &aNode;
  while (n->next) n = n->next; // move to the end

  newNode = new node(value);
  n->next = newNode;
}

int main()
{
  node aNode, bNode;
  add(aNode);
  add_at_end(bNode, "Hello");
  add_at_end(bNode, "World");
  add_at_end(bNode, "!");
}

Compile with g++ -o prog prog.cpp -W -Wall -pedantic.


Finally, here's the STL way of achieving the same thing:

#include <forward_list>
#include <string>
int main() {
  std::forward_list<std::string> bList;
  bList.push_front("Hello");
  bList.push_front("World");
  bList.push_front("!");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think my program is just incorrect syntactically. I have the address of the node I am passing through I don't see how I can't manipulate it to point to another node. –  Mark Jun 16 '11 at 0:21
    
Just turn add_at_end into a method. It's C++ not C with class keyword ;-) –  Pawel Zubrycki Jun 16 '11 at 0:40
    
@Pawel: Hehe, I think we're way past questions of good style, eh? But check out my latest addition. :-) –  Kerrek SB Jun 16 '11 at 0:42

Try

int main() {                                                        

  node *aNode;
  aNode = new node;
  add (*aNode);
}

You have to pass reference to object, not a pointer.

I checked your code and I didn't get segmentation fault when allocating on stack: http://ideone.com/gTRIG.


My proposition:

#include <string>
using namespace std;

struct node {
  string info;
  node *next;
  node(string str): info(str), next(NULL) {}
  ~node() { if(next != NULL) delete next; }
  node *add(string info){
    node *newNode = new node(info);
    return aNode.next = newNode;
  }
};

int main(){
  node rootNode("My rootnode");
  node *nxt = rootNode.add("Next node");
  nxt->add("Last node");
  // No need to call delete, because destructor will clear heap
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 No reason why add can't work on a stack variable. (In fact it does work fine for me.) –  Kerrek SB Jun 16 '11 at 0:23
    
This solves compiler error. You had bad day, or something? –  Pawel Zubrycki Jun 16 '11 at 0:27
    
OK, sorry, I see what you were trying to fix. Undone! (Oh, I cannot undo apparently "until you edit something". Woops.) –  Kerrek SB Jun 16 '11 at 0:29
    
He's changing question :| –  Pawel Zubrycki Jun 16 '11 at 0:34
    
Tell me about it :-S –  Kerrek SB Jun 16 '11 at 0:36

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