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I'm trying to programmatically define several variables in the local namespace:

for build_step in 'prepare', 'configure', 'make', 'stage', 'package', 'all':
    p = build_subparsers.add_parser(build_step)
    p.set_defaults(build_step=build_step)
    if build_step != 'package':
        p.add_argument('specfile')
    locals()['build_'+build_step+'_parser'] = p
build_prepare_parser
NameError: global name 'build_prepare_parser' is not defined

However after running this code, none of the variables I presumed to create actually exist despite appearing in locals(). How do I do this in Python 3.2?

Update0

I know locals() is a bad idea, that's why I'm asking this question.

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1  
    
This is a really bad way of doing this, Why are you editing locals like this, why so many variables. Use a list. – Jakob Bowyer Jun 16 '11 at 0:20
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The answer is: don't do that.

If you want to programmatically store values, use a container:

>>> d = dict()
>>> d['a'] = 5

Or create a container class, if you really must.

>>> class Container(object):
...     pass
... 
>>> c = Container()
>>> setattr(c, 'a', 5)
>>> c.a
5
share|improve this answer
    
See here for a slightly more sophisticated container class. – senderle Jun 16 '11 at 1:24

Why not give build it's own namespace?

class Build(dict):
    def __init__(self):
        self.__dict__ = self

build = Build()
for build_step in 'prepare', 'configure', 'make', 'stage', 'package', 'all':
    p = build_subparsers.add_parser(build_step)
    p.set_defaults(build_step=build_step)
    if build_step != 'package':
        p.add_argument('specfile')
    build[build_step+'_parser'] = p
build.prepare_parser
share|improve this answer
    
I like this one... but somehow the self.__dict__ = self thing makes me feel funny inside. What if you did this? – senderle Jun 16 '11 at 1:22
    
@senderle, sure, that would work. You could also add nice __repr__ etc to the class – John La Rooy Jun 16 '11 at 1:38

According to the docs for locals():

The contents of this dictionary should not be modified; changes may not affect the values of local and free variables used by the interpreter.

Try putting them in globals() (which is the symbol dictionary for the current module, not truly global.)

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