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Best give an example: this code should, the way I see it, produce 10 lists with 100 elements each.

for (i in 1:10){
assign(paste("List", i, sep="."), vector("list", length=100))
  for (j in 1:100){
    assign(paste("List", i, sep=".")[[j]], j+1)
  }
}

But it doesn't.. The first assign works fine, creates an empty list with 100 elements, but how can I fill element [[j]] in it? Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

Instead of making 10 lists in the global environment, it would be much simpler to just make a list of lists:

mybiglist <- list()
for(i in 1:10) {
  mybiglist[[i]] <- list()
  for( j in 1:100 ) {
    mybiglist[[i]][[j]] <- j+1
  }
}

You can add names to any of the lists, or just access the parts by numeric subscripts. this also does not polute your global environment and is usually easier to debug. And when you want to do something with the 10 lists you can just use lapply/sapply instead of needing to fight another loop. You can also save/load/delete/explore/etc. one single object instead of 10.

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This is probably good practice, I tend to end up with very cluttered environment for not being this hygienic! So thanks for that reminder! –  maja Jun 16 '11 at 12:17

Problem is you can't use assign to assign values to elements of objects unless you get a bit tricky. See below.

for (i in 1:10){
  assign(paste("List", i, sep="."), vector("list", length=100))
  for (j in 1:100){
    assign(paste("List", i, sep="."), 
      {x <- get(paste("List", i, sep=".")) 
       x[[j]] <- j + 1 
       x})
  }
}

rm(i, j, x)
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1  
+1 for answering the actual question, but the other answers make a good point that it is more idiomatic R and probably easier in the long run to store as lists rather than inventing many separate list variables –  Ben Bolker Jun 16 '11 at 2:25
    
True. But conceivably there might be a good reason to just have lists stored in some environment (probably not the global though). Environments have properties which can make them pretty useful sometimes. –  wkmor1 Jun 16 '11 at 4:47
    
Thanks wkmor1, that is exactly what I was looking for! Tricky is a good word :) I was only really worried about the names, the example is hypothetical. I imagine list2env is useful in this type of scenario though? –  maja Jun 16 '11 at 12:14

Below code produces 10 lists with 100 elements each.

myList = list()

for (i in 1:10) {
      myList[[i]] = 1:100
}

However, not sure if you want 10 lists of vectors OR 10 lists of lists

In case you would like the latter, you can do something like:

myList = list()

for (i in 1:10) {
  myList[[i]] = list()

  for (j in 1:100) {
      myList[[i]][[j]] = j
  }  
}
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Technically, the first chunk of code creates a list with 10 elements (which is now identical to a data.frame with 10 columns and 100 rows (try str(as.data.frame(myList))). –  Roman Luštrik Jun 16 '11 at 8:45
    
Sorry, I should have been clearer in my post, I was mainly interested in changing the names dynamically! Hvala ipak! –  maja Jun 16 '11 at 12:15

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