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I've been using Jekyll for a static site (so that its easy to maintain), and have been stuck at the following feature :

This is my link bar :

<ul id="links">
    <li class="first"><a class="active" href="/">Home</a></li>
    <li><a href="./associate.html">Associate With Us</a></li>
    <li><a href="./media.html">Media</a></li>
    <li><a href="./clients.html">Clients</a></li>
    <li class="last"><a  href="./contact.html">Contact Us</a></li>
</ul>       

The active class handles the coloring. What I want is this class be applied by jekyll depending on some variable set using liquid/YAML.

Is there some easy way to go about this?

Since the bar is common to all the pages, it is now in the default layout. I could go around by using Javascript to detect the url, and do the highlighting but was wondering if there was any way of doing this in Jekyll.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 36 down vote accepted

I do this in two pages I have set up in Jekyll.

The first thing I do is creating an entry inside _config.yml with the information of all the pages:

# this goes inside _config.yml. Change as required
navigation:
- text: What we do
  url: /en/what-we-do/
- text: Who we are
  url: /en/who-we-are/
- text: Projects
  url: /en/projects/
  layout: project
- text: Blog
  url: /en/blog/
  layout: post

Then, on my main layout, I use that information to generate the navigation links. On each link, I compare the url of the link with the url of the current page. If they are equal, the page is active. Otherwise, they are not.

There's a couple special cases: all blog posts must highlight the "blog" link, and the front pages (English and Spanish) must not present the nav bar. For both cases, I rely on the fact that blog posts and front pages have specific layouts (notice that the "Blog" and "Project" links on the yaml have an extra parameter called "layout")

The navigation code is generated like this:

{% unless page.layout == 'front' %}
  <ul class="navigation">
    {% for link in site.navigation %}
      {% assign current = nil %}
      {% if page.url == link.url or page.layout == link.layout %}
        {% assign current = 'current' %}
      {% endif %}

      <li class="{% if forloop.first %}first{% endif %} {{ current }} {% if forloop.last %}last{% endif %}">
        <a class="{{ current }}" href="{{ link.url }}">{{ link.text }}</a>
      </li>
    {% endfor %}
  </ul>
{% endunless %}

I still have to remember adding an entry to _config.yaml every time I add a new page, and then restart Jekyll, but it happens very infrequently now.

I think the navigation yaml could go inside an _include called "navigation" or something similar, but I haven't tried using yaml inside those so I don't know whether it will work. In my case, since I've got a multi-lingual site, it's easier to have everything inside config (missing translations are easier to spot)

I hope this helps.

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Works perfectly but with one caveat. I can't get it to match the root url (/) since the browser automatically removes that. Any ideas? –  Capt.Nemo Jun 16 '11 at 10:55
    
Sorry, I don't know what you mean. You mean the browser removing code from your html? –  kikito Jun 16 '11 at 16:56
    
In any case, if you need to add a link to the root in your nav, you can use the "layout trick", just like I did for the blog posts. Make a "root" or "front" layout and assign it to the page and to the link. –  kikito Jun 16 '11 at 16:58
    
Check this : roorkites.com. I cannot get the Home url to be parsed with the above solution (in the linkbar). I might resort to the layout trick but I was looking for a simpler solution. The repo is at github –  Capt.Nemo Jun 16 '11 at 17:54
2  
@Capt.Nemo. Pull request sent. The issue was that the permalink of index.html, is, by default "index.html". I've forced it to be "/" instead by adding permalink: / to its top yaml section. –  kikito Jun 16 '11 at 21:09

As a further extension on the work of the other, here is a way to make it work without soggy index.html showing on all your beautiful URLs:

---
navigation:
 - text: Home
   url: /
 - text: Blah
   url: /blah/
---
{% assign url = page.url|remove:'index.html' %}
{% for link in page.navigation %}
<li {% if url == link.url %}class="active"{% endif %}>
    <a href="{{link.url}}" title="{{link.title}}">{{link.text}}</a>
</li>
{% endfor %}

The gold is in the assign statement which gets the page URL (which naturally includes the index.html and then strips it off to match the page.navigation pretty URLs.

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4  
I don't know why this hasn't got any upvotes, it's by far the cleanest and easiest way to do this. Thanks for sharing! –  Trisztán Thar Jul 10 '13 at 8:33
2  
This is the best solution –  tom Jul 12 '13 at 6:29
    
:( This didn't work... I spent quite some time to figure it out: {% capture url %}{{ page.url | remove:'index.html' }}{% endcapture %} –  Mazyod Mar 10 at 4:16

This may be a new feature since the question first appeared, but I've discovered this can all be done in one file:

  1. define the navigation as a variable in the yaml header
  2. loop over the variable using liquid

So in my _layouts/base.html I have:

---
navigation:
- text: Home
  url: /index.html
- text: Travel
  title: Letters home from abroad
  url: /travel.html
---

<ul>
    {% for link in page.navigation %}
    <li {% if page.url == link.url %}class="current"{% endif %}>
       <a href="{{link.url}}" title="{{link.title}}">{{link.text}}</a></li>
    {% endfor %}
</ul>

Which generates this on the Home page:

<ul>
    <li class="current"><a href="/index.html" title="">Home</a></li>
    <li><a href="/travel.html" title="Letters home from abroad">Travel</a></li>
</ul>

And this on the Travel page:

<ul>
    <li><a href="/index.html" title="">Home</a></li>
    <li class="current"><a href="/travel.html" title="Letters home from abroad">Travel</a></li>
</ul>
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I needed something simple, this is what I did.

In my front matter I added a variable called active

e.g.

---
layout: generic
title:  About
active: about
---

I have a navigation include with the following section

    <ul class="nav navbar-nav">
        {% if page.active == "home" %}
            <li class="active"><a href="#">Home</a></li>
        {% else %}
            <li><a href="/">Home</a></li>
        {% endif %}
        {% if page.active == "blog" %}
            <li class="active"><a href="#">Blog</a></li>
        {% else %}
            <li><a href="../blog/">Blog</a></li>
        {% endif %}
        {% if page.active == "about" %}
            <li class="active"><a href="#">About</a></li>
        {% else %}
            <li><a href="../about">About</a></li>
        {% endif %}
    </ul>

This works for me as the amount of links in the navigation are very narrow.

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Same navigation on all pages

After reading all that answers, I came up with a new and easier to maintain solution:

  1. Add {% include nav.html %} to your _layouts/layout.html file
  2. Add a nav.html file to your _includes folder
  3. Add the following content to your nav.html file. It will determine if your link is on the current page and add a class of active as well as remove index.html from your link. It will also work with a subfolder like /repo-name, which is needed for GitHub gh-pages Pages branch.

    <nav>
        <ul class="nav">
            {% assign url = page.url|remove:'index.html' %}
            {% for link in site.navigation %}
                {% assign state = '' %}
                {% if page.url == link.url %}
                    {% assign state = 'active ' %}
                {% endif %}
                <li class="{{ state }}nav-item">
                    <a href="{% if page.url == link.url %}{{ site.baseurl }}{% else %}{{ site.baseurl }}{{ link.url }}{% endif %}" title="{{ link.title }}">{{ link.text }}</a>
                </li>
            {% endfor %}
        </ul>
    </nav>
    
  4. Then add the nav link array to your _config.yml file as following. Mind the right indentation, as YAML is pretty picky on that (Jekyll as well).

    navigation:
          - text: Home
            title: Back to home page
            url: /index.html
          - text: Intro
            title: An introduction to the project
            url: /intro.html 
          - text: etc.
            title: ...
            url: /foo.html 
    

Navigation only on home - "back" for others

Assuming that the link to your "Home"-page (index.html) is the first array part inside the _config.htmls navigation array, you can use the following snippet to show the navigation to the different pages on the main/home page and a link back to the home page on all other pages:

<nav>
    <ul class="grid">
        {% assign url = page.url | remove:'/index.html' %}
        {% assign home = site.navigation.first %}
        {% if url == empty %}
            {% for link in site.navigation %}
                {% assign state = '' %}
                {% if page.url == link.url %}
                    {% assign state = 'active ' %}
                {% endif %}
                {% if home.url != link.url %}
                    <li class="{{ state }}nav-item">
                        <a href="{% if page.url == link.url %}{{ site.baseurl }}{% else %}{{ site.baseurl }}{{ link.url }}{% endif %}" title="{{ link.title }}">{{ link.text }}</a>
                    </li>
                {% endif %}
            {% endfor %}
        {% else %}
            <li class="nav-item active">
                <a href="{{ home.url }}" title="{{ home.title }}">{{ home.text }}</a>
            </li>
        {% endif %}
    </ul>
</nav>
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Navigation highlighting logic is the last thing I would do in server side. I'd rather stick with nice, clean and unobtrusive approach using JS/jQuery (if this option works for you).

  1. The elements which need to be highlighted go inside a common layout like this:

    <nav>
      <a id="section1" href="#">Section 1</a>
      <a id="section2" href="#">Section 2</a>
      <a id="section3" href="#">Section 3</a>
    </nav>
    
  2. In your page (or even in nested layouts) you place an element with data-ref="#section1" (in fact, any jQuery selector will work).

  3. Now, include following JS snippet (shown as jQuery, but any framework will do) in <head>:

    $(function() {
      $("[data-ref]").each(function() {
        $($(this).attr("data-ref")).addClass("current");
      });
    });
    

This approach is nice, because it makes no assumptions on underlying architecture, frameworks, languages and template engines.

Update: As some folks pointed out you might want to omit the $(function() { ... }) part which binds the script to DOM ready event — and just push the script down to the bottom of your <body>.

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1  
This is a very clean solution. Thanks! –  orschiro Aug 23 '13 at 12:47
2  
Sure you can fix everything by just using jQuery but it's far from nice, clean and unobtrusive. By your reasoning, the whole website should be built in jQuery since it makes no assumptions on underlying tech –  bfred.it Mar 1 at 16:06
1  
@bfred.it Yup, this one is very constructive. By my reasoning, navigation highlighting is just navigation highlighting. And everything else is everything else. –  incarnate Mar 12 at 12:17
    
Literally everything else on this page is far nicer. I picked Oli's version for my project. –  bfred.it Mar 12 at 17:32
    
Revisited my own answer after a while. I am still pretty convinced about this one. Here are a few points, if you don't mind. 1. Extensive pattern-matching with if-then-else (this is what every other answers suggest) is always considered a code smell, especially in templates where literally any logic is an unwanted visitor, because clean document semantics code is mixed with logical branches into one big spaghetti ball. –  incarnate Jun 19 at 19:13

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