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I'm trying to update a span tag on the fly with data from an input text field. Basically I have a text field and I'd like to be able to grab the user's input as they type it and show it to them in a span tag below the field.

Code:

<input id="profileurl" type="text">
<p class="url">http://www.randomsite.com/<span id="url-displayname">username</span></p>

JQuery:

var username;

$('#profileurl').keyup(function(username);
$("#url-displayname").html(username);

See it in JS Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/pQ3j9/

I'm guessing the keyup function is not the best way to do this. Since checking the key wouldn't be able to grab prefilled or pasted form input.

Ideally there is some magical jQuery function that can just output whatever info is in the box whenever it detects a key up but if that method exists I haven't found it yet.

EDIT: You guys are fricken amazing. It looks like .val() is that magic method.

Second question: How would you restrict input? Looking at the modified jsfiddle's, when a user inputs an html tag like < hr > the browser interprets it and breaks the form. Do you specify an array and then check against that? Does jquery have anything like PHP's strip_tags function?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
$('#profileurl').keyup(function(e) {
    $("#url-displayname").html($(this).val());
}).keypress(function(e) {
    return /[a-z0-9.-]/i.test(String.fromCharCode(e.which));
});

check out the modified jsfiddle:
http://jsfiddle.net/roberkules/pQ3j9/5/

Update: As @GregL points out, keyup indeed is better, (otherwise e.g. backspaces are not handled at all).

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This is completely awesome! This simplicity of these solutions is staggering. Second question if I may, how would you go about restricting input so that users can't break the layout with random styles or html code? –  Zaqx Jun 16 '11 at 1:54
    
check out the updated demo @ jsfiddle.net/roberkules/pQ3j9/5 which allows only a-Z, 0-9, ., - using a regular expression. –  roberkules Jun 16 '11 at 2:00
    
Any particular reason why keypress and not keyup for the second statement? –  Zaqx Jun 16 '11 at 20:26
    
keyup can't be cancelled –  roberkules Jun 16 '11 at 22:09
    
Thank you for your time on this. Awesome solution. Had no idea javascript would parse with regex. I wanted to allow underscores also so I modified the regex like this: return /[a-z0-9.-_]/i.test(String.fromCharCode(e.which)); –  Zaqx Jun 22 '11 at 21:54

Similar to roberkules' answer, but using keyup() like you proposed seems to work better for me in a Chrome-based browser:

$('#profileurl').keyup(function(e) {
    $("#url-displayname").html($(this).val());
});

Updated jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/pQ3j9/3/

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For the second question, if you wish to maintain characters and not have them parsed as html entities then you should do this instead :

$('#profileurl').keyup(function(key) {
    $("#url-displayname").text($(this).val());
});

Check it out at - http://jsfiddle.net/dhruvasagar/pQ3j9/6/

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You can bind multiple events with bind

http://jsfiddle.net/dwick/DszV9/

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