Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not clear on the difference between -> and ->> in Clojure: from the API reference, it seems like the latter would be the correct way to apply several functions in sequence, i.e. (->> x h g f) would result in f(g(h(x))).

This is related to how Lisp-like language differentiate f(x, y) and (f(x))(y), whereas Haskell does not, correct? (Using math notation; commas intended to imply n-ary functions, not tupling).

Thanks in advance!

Edit

I'm wrong, neither work except on simple functions like (def inc #(+ 1 %)), where they both work.

Here's an example of a function that doesn't work with -> or ->>,

(defn mkinc­ [amnt­] (fn [x] (+ x amnt)­))
(-> 3 (mkin­c 2))
; ERROR -- Wrong number of args (2) passed to: sandbox58780$fn--58797$mkinc
((mkinc 2) 3)
; 5
share|improve this question
    
P.S. what is the proper tag to signify a "beginner" / "newbie" question? –  gatoatigrado Jun 16 '11 at 2:05
2  
the proper way is not to use such tags. –  progo Jun 17 '11 at 5:11
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 18 down vote accepted

-> and ->> are equivalent if all the functions take only one argument. Otherwise, -> passes the value being threaded as the first argument to the function where as ->> passes it as the last argument. The following example should make this clear:

(-> x
    (f 1 2)
    (g 3 4)
    (h 5 6))

becomes

(h (g (f x
         1 2)
      3 4)
   5 6)

or h(g(f(x, 1, 2), 3, 4), 5, 6)

(->> x
     (f 1 2)
     (g 3 4)
     (h 5 6))

becomes

(h 5 6
   (g 3 4
      (f 1 2 x)))

or h(5, 6, g(3, 4, f(1, 2, x)))

Edit: (Responding to the Edit in the question, copying this from the comments).

The example doesn't work because the -> macro inserts the 3 as the first arg of mkinc. See (macroexpand-1 '(-> 3 (mkinc 2))) to understand this better.

This does work: (-> 3 ((mkinc 2))). See (macroexpand-1 '(-> 3 ((mkinc 2)))) to understand why.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much. Is there a function for what I want, or should I just write it myself (see my answer)? –  gatoatigrado Jun 16 '11 at 19:01
    
Since you seem to have single argument functions, you could just do (-> x h g f). Anything that prevents you from doing this? –  Siddhartha Reddy Jun 17 '11 at 3:05
1  
It doesn't work for your example because the -> macro inserts the 3 as the first arg of mkinc; see (macroexpand-1 '(-> 3 (mkinc 2))) to understand this better. –  Siddhartha Reddy Jun 17 '11 at 4:39
    
Sorry I deleted my comment, I was about to add "@" so it showed up in your inbox. Thanks very much! –  gatoatigrado Jun 17 '11 at 4:40
1  
This does work: (-> 3 ((mkinc 2))); see (macroexpand-1 '(-> 3 ((mkinc 2)))) to understand why. –  Siddhartha Reddy Jun 17 '11 at 4:40
show 1 more comment

-> inserts the prev form into the 2nd position. Whereas ->> inserts into the last position. Taking a page from Joy of Clojure, note the insertion point marked by ,,,

(-> x (f ,,, 1) (g ,,, 2) (h ,,, 3))

(->> x (f 1 ,,,) (g 2 ,,,) (h 3 ,,,))
share|improve this answer
add comment

In case there's no solution, I managed to hack it with syntax macros,

(defmacro fwcomp [& fcns] `(comp ~@(reverse fcns)))
(defmacro |> [x & fcns] `((fwcomp ~@fcns) ~x))

Usage:

(|> x h g f) ; equal to f(g(h(x)))
share|improve this answer
1  
It's called comp. ((comp h g f) x) –  kotarak Jun 16 '11 at 6:12
1  
Woops. Should have read the macro definition. Nevermind. –  kotarak Jun 16 '11 at 11:14
    
yeah that's regular (backwards) composition, you really want ((comp f g h) x). –  gatoatigrado Jun 16 '11 at 19:02
1  
You can also do define |> with a function. Renamed to thrush: (defn thrush [x & fcns] (reduce #(%2 %1) x fcns)) –  Sam Ritchie Nov 6 '11 at 19:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.