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I'm calculating the distance between two GeoCoordinates. I'm testing my app against 3-4 other apps. When I'm calculating distance, I tend to get an average of 3.3 miles for my calculation whereas other apps are getting 3.5 miles. It's a big difference for the calculation I'm trying to perform. Are there any good class libraries out there for calculating distance? I'm calculating it like this in C#:

public static double Calculate(double sLatitude,double sLongitude, double eLatitude, 
                               double eLongitude)
{
    var sLatitudeRadians = sLatitude * (Math.PI / 180.0);
    var sLongitudeRadians = sLongitude * (Math.PI / 180.0);
    var eLatitudeRadians = eLatitude * (Math.PI / 180.0);
    var eLongitudeRadians = eLongitude * (Math.PI / 180.0);

    var dLongitude = eLongitudeRadians - sLongitudeRadians;
    var dLatitude = eLatitudeRadians - sLatitudeRadians;

    var result1 = Math.Pow(Math.Sin(dLatitude / 2.0), 2.0) + 
                  Math.Cos(sLatitudeRadians) * Math.Cos(eLatitudeRadians) * 
                  Math.Pow(Math.Sin(dLongitude / 2.0), 2.0);

    // Using 3956 as the number of miles around the earth
    var result2 = 3956.0 * 2.0 * 
                  Math.Atan2(Math.Sqrt(result1), Math.Sqrt(1.0 - result1));

    return result2;
}

What could I be doing wrong? Should I calculate it in km first and then convert to miles?

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1  
Earth mean radius = 6,371km = 3958.76 miles –  Mitch Wheat Jun 16 '11 at 2:14
    
    
shouldn't this be on gis.stackexchange.com –  Daniel Powell Jun 16 '11 at 2:22
    
It could have, but my question pertains more to calculating this on a Windows Phone which is a bit different. The formula is the same, but newer method calls like the DistanceTo method aren't necessarily available. –  Jason N. Gaylord Jun 17 '11 at 5:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 83 down vote accepted

The GeoCoordinate class already has GetDistanceTo method.

var sCoord = new GeoCoordinate(sLatitude, sLongitude);
var eCoord = new GeoCoordinate(eLatitude, eLongitude);

return sCoord.GetDistanceTo(eCoord);
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+1. Good one!.... –  Mitch Wheat Jun 16 '11 at 10:02
    
Nigel, are you sure that the DistanceTo method will work on the phone? I thought it used the 2.0 version of GeoCoordinate for WP7. –  Jason N. Gaylord Jun 17 '11 at 5:20
1  
I did check this and the GeoCordinate for the device has a GetDistanceTo method which is what you had referenced (but not what you have above). No big deal. I'm going to test this out to see if the built in calculation is any better. Thanks Nigel! –  Jason N. Gaylord Jun 17 '11 at 5:37

Here is the JavaScript version guys and gals

function distanceTo(lat1, lon1, lat2, lon2, unit) {
      var rlat1 = Math.PI * lat1/180
      var rlat2 = Math.PI * lat2/180
      var rlon1 = Math.PI * lon1/180
      var rlon2 = Math.PI * lon2/180
      var theta = lon1-lon2
      var rtheta = Math.PI * theta/180
      var dist = Math.sin(rlat1) * Math.sin(rlat2) + Math.cos(rlat1) * Math.cos(rlat2) * Math.cos(rtheta);
      dist = Math.acos(dist)
      dist = dist * 180/Math.PI
      dist = dist * 60 * 1.1515
      if (unit=="K") { dist = dist * 1.609344 }
      if (unit=="N") { dist = dist * 0.8684 }
      return dist
}
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Earth mean radius = 6,371km = 3958.76 miles

Rather than use var I suggest you use double, just to be explicit.

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for those who can't use GetDistance (e.g. Universal App)

static public double DistanceTo(double lat1, double lon1, double lat2, double lon2, char unit = 'K')
{
    double rlat1 = Math.PI*lat1/180;
    double rlat2 = Math.PI*lat2/180;
    double rlon1 = Math.PI*lon1/180;
    double rlon2 = Math.PI*lon2/180;
    double theta = lon1 - lon2;
    double rtheta = Math.PI*theta/180;
    double dist = 
        Math.Sin(rlat1) * Math.Sin(rlat2) + Math.Cos(rlat1) * 
        Math.Cos(rlat2) * Math.Cos(rtheta);
    dist = Math.Acos(dist);
    dist = dist*180/Math.PI;
    dist = dist*60*1.1515;

    switch (unit)
    {
        case 'K': //Kilometers -> default
            return dist * 1.609344;
        case 'N': //Nautical Miles 
            return dist * 0.8684;
        case 'M': //Miles
            return dist;
    }

    return dist;
}
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Try this:

    public double getDistance(GeoCoordinate p1, GeoCoordinate p2)
    {
        double d = p1.Latitude * 0.017453292519943295;
        double num3 = p1.Longitude * 0.017453292519943295;
        double num4 = p2.Latitude * 0.017453292519943295;
        double num5 = p2.Longitude * 0.017453292519943295;
        double num6 = num5 - num3;
        double num7 = num4 - d;
        double num8 = Math.Pow(Math.Sin(num7 / 2.0), 2.0) + ((Math.Cos(d) * Math.Cos(num4)) * Math.Pow(Math.Sin(num6 / 2.0), 2.0));
        double num9 = 2.0 * Math.Atan2(Math.Sqrt(num8), Math.Sqrt(1.0 - num8));
        return (6376500.0 * num9);
    }
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Based on Elliot Wood's function, this C function is working...

#define SIM_Degree_to_Radian(x) ((float)x * 0.017453292F)
#define SIM_PI_VALUE                         (3.14159265359)

float GPS_Distance(float lat1, float lon1, float lat2, float lon2)
{
   float theta;
   float dist;

   theta = lon1 - lon2;

   lat1 = SIM_Degree_to_Radian(lat1);
   lat2 = SIM_Degree_to_Radian(lat2);
   theta = SIM_Degree_to_Radian(theta);

   dist = (sin(lat1) * sin(lat2)) + (cos(lat1) * cos(lat2) * cos(theta));
   dist = acos(dist);

//   dist = dist * 180.0 / SIM_PI_VALUE;
//   dist = dist * 60.0 * 1.1515;
//   /* Convert to km */
//   dist = dist * 1.609344;

   dist *= 6370.693486F;

   return (dist);
}

You may change it to double. It returns the value in km.

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