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Forgive me for this is a very simple script in Bash. Here's the code:

#!/bin/bash
# june 2011

if [ $# -lt 3 -o $# -gt 3 ]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi

after running sh file.sh:

syntax error: unexpected end of file

share|improve this question
up vote 35 down vote accepted

I think file.sh is with CRLF line terminators.

run

dos2unix file.sh

then the problem will be fixed.

You can install dos2unix in ubuntu with this:

sudo apt-get install dos2unix
share|improve this answer
    
thanks guys! all of you are right. there's something non-unix character embedded on my code! thanks – markcruz Jun 16 '11 at 2:54
    
thanks! saved me a lot of time! surprised I need to google this many pages before running into this answer. – Derek Jul 3 '13 at 6:01
    
Whats the reason behind this problem? I usually work on Windows but need to transfer scripts to unix systems. – CMCDragonkai Nov 2 '13 at 16:06
3  
Makes no change for me. Downvoting. Sorry. – Kees de Kooter Dec 5 '14 at 8:35
1  
@KeesdeKooter I wouldn't say just because something didn't work for you that you should downvote it, clearly it worked for the 28 upvotes. A simple it didn't work for me suffices. That's why SO allowed multiple answers to a question because there can be multiple solutions to a problem. – Jeff Wilbert Jul 27 '15 at 15:33

Another thing to check (just occured to me):

  • terminate bodies of single-line functions with semicolon

I.e. this innocent-looking snippet will cause the same error:

die () { test -n "$@" && echo "$@"; exit 1 }

To make the dumb parser happy:

die () { test -n "$@" && echo "$@"; exit 1; }
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1  
Whoa, excellent, I was having this error for months. Thanks. – thiagowfx Nov 16 '14 at 3:53
1  
thanks a lot :) – clement Dec 17 '14 at 16:47
    
+1 Also applies to code snippets with brackets like so: [[ "$#" == 1 ]] && [[ "$arg" == [1,2,3,4] ]] && printf "%s\n" "blah" || { printf "%s\n" "blahblah"; usage; } ............ Note that semicolon inside the squiggly brackets, just after calling some previously defined function 'usage'. Forgetting that will get you the same syntax error: unexpected eof. – Cbhihe Jun 19 '15 at 8:45

on cygwin I needed:-

 export SHELLOPTS
 set -o igncr

in .bash_profile . This way I didn't need to run unix2dos

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1  
That worked for me. Thank you! – Waruyama Sep 13 '15 at 21:34

i also just got this error message by using the wrong syntax in an if clause

  • else if (syntax error: unexpected end of file)
  • elif (correct syntax)

i debugged it by commenting bits out until it worked

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I was able to cut and paste your code into a file and it ran correctly. If you execute it like this it should work:

Your "file.sh":

#!/bin/bash
# june 2011

if [ $# -lt 3 -o $# -gt 3 ]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi

The command:

$ ./file.sh arg1 arg2 arg3

Note that "file.sh" must be executable:

$ chmod +x file.sh

You may be getting that error b/c of how you're doing input (w/ a pipe, carrot, etc.). You could also try splitting the condition into two:

if [ $# -lt 3 ] || [ $# -gt 3 ]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi

Or, since you're using bash, you could use built-in syntax:

if [[ $# -lt 3 || $# -gt 3 ]]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi

And, finally, you could of course just check if 3 arguments were given (clean, maintains POSIX shell compatibility):

if [ $# -ne 3 ]; then
   echo "Error... Usage: $0 host database username"
   exit 0
fi
share|improve this answer
    
i still got the same error. im not exactly sure where the code goes wrong – markcruz Jun 16 '11 at 2:43
    
weird, i cut and pasted your code and it worked as expected. was there any more error output? a lot of time bash will list a line number. also, what system are you running? (Linux, MacOS, BSD, distro, etc) – aaronstacy Jun 16 '11 at 2:47

I just cut-and-pasted your example into a file; it ran fine under bash. I don't see any problems with it.

For good measure you may want to ensure it ends with a newline, though bash shouldn't care. (It runs for me both with and without the final newline.)

You'll sometimes see strange errors if you've accidentally embedded a control character in the file. Since it's a short script, try creating a new script by pasting it from your question here on StackOverflow, or by simply re-typing it.

What version of bash are you using? (bash --version)

Good luck!

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Make sure the name of the directory in which the .sh file is present does not have a space character. e.g: Say if it is in a folder called 'New Folder', you're bound to come across the error that you've cited. Instead just name it as 'New_Folder'. I hope this helps.

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