Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

All,

I'm trying to write a function that would check in my users table whether a user name or a user email exist already. This is to be used as a check during user registration.

I want to be able to use the same function to check whether an email or a name exist. I would use the function by sending it 2 string variables, a $tableColName which represents the column in the db table (so either "userName" or "userEmail", and a $userIdentifier, which represents either a user name or a user email I want to query on.

I wrote the following (modified to be free standing):

<?php
    $dbHost="localhost";
    $dbName="project";
    $dbUser="admin";
    $dbPassword="abcd";
    $dbh=new PDO("mysql:host=$dbHost;dbname=$dbName", $dbUser, $dbPassword);
    $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
    $userIdentifier="apple";  // Or "apple@gmail.com", which is an email
    $tableColName="userName"; // Or "userEmail"
    $sth=$dbh->prepare("SELECT * FROM users WHERE :tableColName = :userIdentifier");
            $sth->bindParam(":tableColName", $tableColName);
            $sth->bindParam(":userIdentifier", $userIdentifier);
            $sth->execute();
    print("PDO::FETCH_ASSOC: ");
    print("Return next row as an array indexed by column name");
    echo "</br>";
    $result = $sth->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
    print_r($result);
    echo "</br>";
    if ($result==null){
        print("FALSE - result is null");
    }else{
        print("TRUE - result isn't null");
    }
?>

This doesn't work. What works is a query where I specify the column name directly in the query instead of using a parameter, but I loose the flexibility I sought:

<?php
    $dbHost="localhost";
    $dbName="project";
    $dbUser="admin";
    $dbPassword="abcd";
    $dbh=new PDO("mysql:host=$dbHost;dbname=$dbName", $dbUser, $dbPassword);
    $dbh->setAttribute(PDO::ATTR_ERRMODE, PDO::ERRMODE_EXCEPTION);
    $userName="apple";
    $sth=$dbh->prepare("SELECT * FROM users WHERE userName = :userIdentifier"); // Cannot be used for userEmail search.
            $sth->bindParam(":userIdentifier", $userName);
            $sth->execute();
    print("PDO::FETCH_ASSOC: ");
    print("Return next row as an array indexed by column name");
    echo "</br>";
    $result = $sth->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
    print_r($result);
    echo "</br>";
    if ($result==null){
        print("FALSE - result is null");
    }else{
        print("TRUE - result isn't null");
    }
?>

What am I doing wrong?

Thanks,

JDelage

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

+1'ed for my love of PDO!

As for your issue friend, table names and column names cannot be passed as parameters in PDO. Refer to this post for more info.

I believe using good old variables (filtered of course!) would work out nice for you.

 $tableName = "email";
 $sth=$dbh->prepare("SELECT * FROM users WHERE $tableName = :userIdentifier");

        $sth->bindParam(":userIdentifier", $userIdentifier);
        $sth->execute();

Not tested , but it should give you a start. Also, do remember to filter $tableName, one (of many) simple way this can be done with a simple array that holds a whitelist of allowed tablenames, here is a simple example:

$validTables = array('email', 'username');

if(!in_array($tableName, $validTables)){ 
    throw new Exception("Invalid Table Name");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Fascinating, I'm going to try that right away. –  JDelage Jun 16 '11 at 3:24
    
Sorry for my bad formatting I have major keyboard problems at the moment. ;) –  stefgosselin Jun 16 '11 at 3:27
    
Yep, that seems to work, I wonder why they allow the use of a variable but not of parameters. In any case, I can deal with it. Thank you. –  JDelage Jun 16 '11 at 3:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.