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I am using this code to make stars light up when you hover over them(a rating system). It works absolutely perfectly in Chrome, but when I tried to use it in IE, it doesn't do anything. Can anyone help me make this work in IE? (Yes, I know the code looks horrible. I am very new to Javascript, which is probably why this bug is happening.) I am pretty sure it is coming from this part of the Javascript code making everything undefined:

var star_all = document.getElementsByName('stars'); 

for (x in star_all){
    var stars = new Array();
    stars[0]=childbyid(star_all[x], 'str1');

Anyways, here is all of the code:

HTML Code:

<div name="stars" class="stars">
    <input name="bob" id="hid" type="hidden" />
    <div id="str1" style="display: inline-block;" class="no_star"></div>
    <div id="str2" style="display: inline-block;" class="no_star"></div>
    <div id="str3" style="display: inline-block;" class="no_star"></div>
    <div id="str4" style="display: inline-block;" class="no_star"></div>
    <div id="str5" style="display: inline-block;" class="no_star"></div>
</div>

Javascript Code:

<script type="text/javascript">
function isElement(obj) {
    try {
        return obj instanceof HTMLElement;
    }
    catch(e){
        return (typeof obj==="object") &&
            (obj.nodeType===1) && (typeof obj.style === "object") &&
            (typeof obj.ownerDocument ==="object");
    }
}
function childbyid(el, str)
{
    var children = el.childNodes;
    for(i in children)
    {
        if (isElement(children[i]) === true && typeof children[i] != 'undefined')
        {
            if (children[i].getAttribute('id') == str)
            {
                return children[i];
            }
        }
    }
}

var star_bob = new Array();
function select(arr, n)
{
    star_bob[arr][2] = n;
    star_bob[arr][1].setAttribute("value", n+1);
    if (document.getElementById('star_post') != null)
    {
        document.getElementById('star_post').submit();
    }
}

function highlight(arr, n)
{
    if (n == -1)
    {
        n = star_bob[arr][2];
    }
    arr = star_bob[arr][0];
    for (z in arr){
        if (z <= n){
            arr[z].setAttribute("class", "full_star")
        }
        else
        {
            arr[z].setAttribute("class", "no_star")
        }
    }
}

var star_all = document.getElementsByName('stars'); 

for (x in star_all){
    var stars = new Array();
    stars[0]=childbyid(star_all[x], 'str1');
    stars[1]=childbyid(star_all[x], 'str2');
    stars[2]=childbyid(star_all[x], 'str3');
    stars[3]=childbyid(star_all[x], 'str4');
    stars[4]=childbyid(star_all[x], 'str5');

    for (o in stars){
        if (typeof stars[o] != 'undefined')
        {
            stars[o].setAttribute("onmouseover", "highlight(" + x + ", " + o + ")")
            stars[o].setAttribute("onmouseout", "highlight(" + x + ", -1)")
            stars[o].setAttribute("onclick", "select(" + x + ", " + o + ")");
        }
    }
    if (typeof star_all[x] == "object")
    {
        star_bob[x] = new Array(stars, childbyid(star_all[x],"hid"),-1);
    }
}
</script>
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closed as too localized by Roddy, leppie, jldupont, Bala R, Graviton Jun 16 '11 at 14:29

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
well, star_bob is created in an if statement, so maybe it never gets created. –  Lance Roberts Jun 16 '11 at 3:44
    
Don't use for...in to iterate over arrays. It's meant for objects. developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/… I have to ask: why aren't you using a cross-browser library? That isElement function is a disaster and a half. I appreciate that you're trying to learn JavaScript without relying on DOM libraries, but this does not seem productive to me. –  Matt Ball Jun 16 '11 at 3:56
    
Yea, I should use jQuery. I just thought it would be easier with regular JS. –  Matt Jun 16 '11 at 4:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a few issues:

  1. div elements don't have a name attribute, so don't use it. If you want to group elements, use a class.

  2. getElementsByName returns a live NodeList, better to iterate over it using indexes as it may have enumerable properties you aren't expecting.

  3. the isElement test is rubbish, you are iterating over a NodeList so everything in it is a node. To filter elements, grab those with nodeType == 1. Browsers do not have to implement elements as ECMAScript objects, so don't expect them to.

  4. Much better to put styles in a style sheet.

  5. The childbyid function can be replaced by a single getElementById call since id's are unique (unless you are expecting the id to maybe not be where it should be).

  6. Don't code HTML like it is XML, it isn't.

A replacement isElement function (cheap and nasty but effective for this case) :

function isElement(obj) {
  return obj && obj.nodeType == 1;
}

A replacement childbyid function (seems pointless, should just use getElementById):

function childbyid(el, str) {
  var children = el.childNodes;
  var i = children.length;

  while (i--){
    if (children[i].id == str) {
        return children[i];
    }
  }
}

Probably won't fix all your issues but might help. The entire thing needs to be re-written, and don't use jQuery or any other library, learn javascript first. Then you'll realise you don't need jQuery.

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