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Why would this select, call it A, (0.02406s):

select * from char_kills
where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last >= 110
order by kills desc
limit 500;

be 10 times slower than when sort order is reversed, call it B, (0.00229s):

select * from char_kills
where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last >= 110
order by kills
limit 500;

and how could you optimize A? Using InnoDB tables on MySQL 5.5.


More info follows.

describe char_kills;

cid, int(10) unsigned, NO, PRI, , 
rid_first, int(10) unsigned, NO, PRI, , 
rid_last, int(10) unsigned, NO, PRI, , 
kills, int(11), NO, PRI, , 
offi_rank, smallint(5) unsigned, YES, , , 

select count(*) from char_kills;

146312

select count(*) from char_kills where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last >= 110;

7207

show indexes from char_kills;

char_kills, 0, PRIMARY, 1, kills, A, 160711, , , , BTREE, , 
char_kills, 0, PRIMARY, 2, rid_first, A, 160711, , , , BTREE, , 
char_kills, 0, PRIMARY, 3, rid_last, A, 160711, , , , BTREE, , 
char_kills, 0, PRIMARY, 4, cid, A, 160711, , , , BTREE, , 

A:

Explain:
1, SIMPLE, char_kills, index, , PRIMARY, 16, , 500, Using where

Profiling:
0.02406750, select * from char_kills where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last >= 110 order by kills desc limit 500

starting, 0.000050
checking permissions, 0.000007
Opening tables, 0.000029
System lock, 0.000008
init, 0.000022
optimizing, 0.000008
statistics, 0.000013
preparing, 0.000012
executing, 0.000003
Sorting result, 0.000006
Sending data, 0.023822
end, 0.000007
query end, 0.000004
closing tables, 0.000015
freeing items, 0.000058
logging slow query, 0.000002
cleaning up, 0.000004

B:

Explain:
1, SIMPLE, char_kills, index, , PRIMARY, 16, , 500, Using where

Profiling:
0.00229975, select * from char_kills where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last >= 110 order by kills limit 500

starting, 0.000049
checking permissions, 0.000007
Opening tables, 0.000027
System lock, 0.000008
init, 0.000019
optimizing, 0.000008
statistics, 0.000012
preparing, 0.000009
executing, 0.000003
Sorting result, 0.000004
Sending data, 0.002091
end, 0.000004
query end, 0.000003
closing tables, 0.000010
freeing items, 0.000042
logging slow query, 0.000002
cleaning up, 0.000003

More permutations

Slow:

where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last >= 110 order by kills desc limit 500; -- 0.031s, A, 7k matching rows
where rid_first >= 110 and rid_last <= 110 order by kills      limit 500; -- 0.094s, 449 rows

Fast:

where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last >= 110 order by kills      limit 500; -- 0.000s, B
where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last <= 110 order by kills      limit 500; -- 0.000s
where rid_first >= 110 and rid_last >= 110 order by kills desc limit 500; -- 0.000s
where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last <= 110 order by kills desc limit 500; -- 0.000s
where rid_first <= 110 and rid_last <= 110 order by kills desc limit 500; -- 0.000s
where rid_first <= 110                     order by kills desc limit 500; -- 0.000s
where                      rid_last >= 110 order by kills desc limit 500; -- 0.000s
share|improve this question
2  
The issue happens because you have 2 range conditions in where and unfortunately you cannot do anything. –  zerkms Jun 16 '11 at 5:08
    
@zerkms, bah. I'm using these r(eading)_id ranges to "compress" the table when kills do not change, which is usually the case. Do you think it could be better to skip that then? I've tried it once long time ago but with many more rows in the table everything was much slower (altho I was possibly doing it not very optimally). –  Qtax Jun 16 '11 at 5:13
    
@Qtax: I cannot get the details of your explanation, but mysql just cannot optimize 2 range comparisons. Yes, there is index merge for such cases but I haven't seen it worked in real life. –  zerkms Jun 16 '11 at 5:15
    
@zerkms, I mean if I would change the table so that instead of having rid_first, rid_last columns and ranged comparisons on these I would just use a rid column and direct equality on it. But if this is done the number of rows in the table would be 500 to 5000 times higher. –  Qtax Jun 16 '11 at 5:24
    
@Qtax: I think the problem is with the size and distribution of your data. mysql will have to traverse 146312 rows to retrieve the results without WHERE, ORDER BY and LIMIT. With WHERE, ORDER BY and proper indexes, mysql will still have to traverse all records if the last record matched by WHERE clause is located at the end of data. Indexes help in finding matching rows, fetching rows is still labor intensive. –  Salman A Jun 16 '11 at 11:30

1 Answer 1

The answer to why this happens is rather stupid (and obvious in the large Sending data time of the problem query):

Picture your database (which is stored as a file as you likely know) as a large rectangular cornfield and you are standing in front of it. If you want to pick the corn from corn plans which are located in the 4 corners of the cornfield it would obviously be slower (because you have to walk far) then to pick the corn from the corn plants in front of you.

In computers as (in anything) distance matters and it's express in IO latency (and 'misses' to find expected info somewhere).

So the reason for the slowness is that: a) the problem query happens to need to read data from all over the file (rather then sequential reads as the fast query does)

b) you haven't defragmented you database recently

c) you index is inappropriately defined

EDIT: To make it clear, the queries find the needed records nearly as fast so the problem is not in the indexing or its definition (not the biggest at least, try to make multi-column index to include all your columns just for test) but when the query says "Ok I know where everything is located now, let me go get it for displaying" <-- this fetching process is what kills one of them.

share|improve this answer
    
@selion, I don't think that a) nor b) are the problem. After several repeated runs of the same query the data (on disk) should be cached (by the OS, I have enough RAM), but still it takes as much time. c) what index could be used instead? –  Qtax Jun 16 '11 at 6:10
    
@selion, as for your edit, as you can see in the question, the primary index already includes pretty much everything. –  Qtax Jun 16 '11 at 6:13
1  
@Qtax: Nope the OS doesn't cache anything for you in this case, the DB engine caches queries & sometimes locations of records (but not the results of the reads...), the hardware caches are not your concern. c) try multi column index, this will align and bring your records closer and hopefully you get the same result. Also if you've inserted 100000 records and then try the queies, rebuild your index at the least –  selion Jun 16 '11 at 6:17
    
@Qtax: "as for your edit, as you can see in the question, .." I never use this database to understand its syntax. But if that's the case this is yet another proof of what I suggest. Another suggestion is to partition your data but relation database don't support this too well so you have to implement logically - allowcate certain amount of rows before hand for each partition ... –  selion Jun 16 '11 at 6:21
    
reorder your columns in the index and try again: rid_first, int(10) unsigned, NO, PRI, , rid_last, int(10) unsigned, NO, PRI, , cid, int(10) unsigned, NO, PRI, , . Also remove what you don't search by from the index. kills, int(11), NO, PRI, , offi_rank, smallint(5) unsigned –  selion Jun 16 '11 at 6:26

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