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Puzzle Grinch

Part I

This layout can be done quite simply with 2 HTML tables, one nested inside the other, or even with a single table.

It can also be done with CSS, though it might involve a little more thinking.

This may not be a real world layout, but I have seen pages that are similar. Consider this a riddle; an exercise to buff up your CSS skills.

To make things a little more interesting, I have framed the question in a little 2 part web page called The Challenge. We will examine the code and the question: Layout with tables or CSS?, side-by-side, blow-by-blow, as our two opponents battle it out for code supremacy.

Part I lays out how The Challenge came to be. I hope you enjoy.

Part II is The Decision. You might be surprised.


Part II

I was amazed at how quickly really good answers appeared mere minutes after I posted. It was a humbling experience. I have no desire to compete in time trials with you.

BUT, all that being said, upon close examination of the solutions offered, I came to realize that none of the CSS solutions (including my own at the time) worked as well as either of the table solutions offered. The Challenge was all about CSS being better than tables for any layout solution.

So I added 3 new rules (remember, one of the rules is that the rules can be changed). This annoyed some people. So then I added some colorful explanations about why the rules were changed. I think this annoyed them even more.

  1. Our garden is to have a fence around it; something to set it apart from whatever dreary surroundings it may find itself in; and not too expensive, but easy to keep clean. So I want a 1 pixel black border around the garden
  2. Inhabitants of each garden plot (the characters) must be either black or white, depending on which shows them the best in their garden. Also they are all of cursive descent. There are no italics amoung them. ;-)
  3. The garden is relocatable, that is, I can have this garden, anywhere on the page (no absolute positioning).

This is what the final output is to look like (background color optional):

alt text

My apologies for the capricious and last minute rule changes. I had it wrong. The inhabitants of each garden plot are artisans, hand crafted specialists. They are descendants of the cursive family, and owe their sense of style to the italics.

The garden has to be relocatable because both kinds of gardens (table and CSS) need to coexist on the same page. I may be wrong to say that position:absolute rules are not allowed. If you can get them to work in this context, then more power to you. They will certainly be accepted.

I asked for a fence around the plot because each garden type is going to be planted in a countryside with an orange background very similar to the color of the some of the flowers we grow.

I live in Holland now, and the Tulip season is fast approaching. If you fly over Holland in the next few weeks, and it's a clear day (kind of rare here) the landscape below you will look rather similar to this silly exercise.

I'm not crazy about orange but I do like and admire the Dutch, so that is why we have an orange background, a tribute to my host country. :-)


Part III

I have posted Ted's table answer from The Challenge below along with this image

alt text

because the occupants can be easily added to the garden plots without touching the CSS rules - everything is automatically centered.

Can you do this with CSS? Can you chop down the mightiest tree in the forest with... a herring?


Update: Charlie's answer is here.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Sam Hasler, Kev Sep 2 '12 at 23:38

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I don't see why you would want to nest 2 tables for this, it can be done in one. –  Jacco Mar 11 '09 at 23:07
    
Are the heights and widths all fixed? –  alex Mar 11 '09 at 23:09
    
Am I right in thinking the aim is to create the most concise markup possible? –  Sam Hasler Mar 12 '09 at 0:49
4  
Do we have to include the Dr Suess character? –  Andrew Shepherd Mar 12 '09 at 1:47
14  
Wow... Post a question, get several great solutions, modify the question, get more feedback, modify it again, get more input, then post your own solution and accept that. Are you just trying to drum up traffic for your site? –  Prestaul Mar 15 '09 at 1:26

12 Answers 12

Update: Final edit. Switched to STRICT DTD, removed italic to match the image in the question, and reverted back to full colour names for ids to show intent as per OPs comment on question, and sorted the main column of id names in the css into the order they appear in the html.

I also opted not to reused the outer div as the white 7 square (it didn't have it's own div in previous edits), as it wouldn't have been practical if you wanted to use the layout, and felt a little like cheating (although from a brevity/pixel perfect standpoint I liked the cheekiness of it).

View here: http://jsbin.com/efidi
Edit here: http://jsbin.com/efidi/edit
Validates as XHTML strict

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
  "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head><title>The Challenge</title>
<style type="text/css">
div     { text-align: center; width:175px; height:175px; line-height: 35px;}
div div {         float:left; width: 35px; height: 35px;}
#orange, #maroon,
#blue  , #green  {float:right;}

#orange, #silver {background-color:silver;  width:140px;}
#navy  , #maroon {background-color:maroon; height:140px; line-height:140px;}
         #navy   {background-color:navy  ;}
#green , #red    {background-color:red   ;  width: 70px;}
#yellow, #blue   {background-color:blue  ; height: 70px; line-height: 70px;}
         #yellow {background-color:yellow;}
         #white  {background-color:white ;}
         #green  {background-color:green ;}
         #orange {background-color:orange;}
</style> 
</head> 
<body> 
  <div> 
    <div id="silver">1</div> 
    <div id="maroon">2</div> 
    <div id="navy"  >3</div> 
    <div id="red"   >4</div> 
    <div id="blue"  >5</div> 
    <div id="yellow">6</div> 
    <div id="white" >7</div>
    <div id="green" >8</div> 
    <div id="orange">9</div> 
  </div>
</body></html>

Aside: I would perhaps put a little more whitespace in if I could, but this is at the limit before the code blocks here on SO starts getting scrollbars and I opted to have it all appear on screen.

Note: I borrowed the line-height fix from Tyson (who was first to get a correctly rendering answer).

share|improve this answer
    
This solution works in IE 5.5, IE7, and Firefox 3. It just needs the numbers and it's perfect. –  attack Mar 11 '09 at 23:41
    
@attack, Thanks for pointing that out, fixed now. –  Sam Hasler Mar 12 '09 at 2:51
    
Minified my answer and by my count it's 180 characters less than the table solution: 1042 (table) to 858 (mine) characters not counting body/head/style tags. –  Sam Hasler Mar 12 '09 at 4:07
    
You forgot the right font “Comic Sans MS” and blue text color if you really want a pixel perfect solution. ;) –  Gumbo Mar 12 '09 at 9:57
    
It does NOT render correctly in IE6.SP1 on Win2k. (but what does?) –  Jacco Mar 12 '09 at 10:47

Here are three solutions.

The markup:

<div id="outer">
    <div id="a1">1</div>
    <div id="a2">2</div>
    <div id="a3">3</div>
    <div id="a4">4</div>
    <div id="a5">5</div>
    <div id="a6">6</div>
    <div id="a7">7</div>
    <div id="a8">8</div>
    <div id="a9">9</div>
</div>

The basic stylesheet (dimensions and color):

#outer {
    width: 20em;
    height: 20em;
}
#a1 {
    background-color: #C0C0C0;
    width: 80%;
    height: 20%;
}
#a2 {
    background-color: #800000;
    width: 20%;
    height: 80%;
}
#a3 {
    background-color: #000080;
    width: 20%;
    height: 80%;
}
#a4 {
    background-color: #FF0000;
    width: 40%;
    height: 20%;
}
#a5 {
    background-color: #0000FF;
    width: 20%;
    height: 40%;
}
#a6 {
    background-color: #FFFF00;
    width: 20%;
    height: 40%;
}
#a7 {
    background-color: #FFFFFF;
    width: 20%;
    height: 20%;
}
#a8 {
    background-color: #008000;
    width: 40%;
    height: 20%;
}
#a9 {
    background-color: #FFA500;
    height: 20%;
    width: 80%;
}

And now the positioning:

  • Using float:

    #a1 {
        float: left;
    }
    #a2 {
        float: right;
    }
    #a3 {
        float: left;
    }
    #a4 {
        float: left;
    }
    #a5 {
        float: right;
    }
    #a6 {
        float: left;
    }
    #a7 {
        float: left;
    }
    #a8 {
        float: right;
    }
    #a9 {
        float: right;
    }
    
  • Using position:

    #outer {
        position: relative;
    }
    #outer div {
        position: absolute;
    }
    #a1 {
        top: 0;
        left: 0;
    }
    #a2 {
        top: 0;
        right: 0;
    }
    #a3 {
        top: 20%;
        left: 0;
    }
    #a4 {
        top: 20%;
        left: 20%;
    }
    #a5 {
        top: 20%;
        right: 20%;
    }
    #a6 {
        top: 40%;
        left: 20%;
    }
    #a7 {
        top: 40%;
        left: 40%;
    }
    #a8 {
        bottom: 20%;
        right: 20%;
    }
    #a9 {
        bottom: 0;
        right: 0;
    }
    
  • Using margin:

    #a1 {
    }
    #a2 {
        margin: -20% -80% 0 80%;
    }
    #a3 {
        margin: -60% 0 0 0;
    }
    #a4 {
        margin: -80% -20% 0 20%;
    }
    #a5 {
        margin: -20% -60% 0 60%;
    }
    #a6 {
        margin: -20% -20% 0 20%;
    }
    #a7 {
        margin: -40% -40% 0 40%;
    }
    #a8 {
        margin: 0 -40% 0 40%;
    }
    #a9 {
        margin: 0 -20% 0 20%;
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
text isn't vertically and horizontally centered. (nor is it italic, although that's a minor quibble.) –  Sam Hasler Mar 12 '09 at 0:47
    
Technically it's also not to the correct size (the challenge page linked to in the question states that there is a 35px square in the center.) –  Sam Hasler Mar 12 '09 at 0:54
6  
Well I though it’s a layout question and not a pixel-by-pixel question. –  Gumbo Mar 12 '09 at 9:16
1  
It's both layout an pixel. I want it ALL. –  Diogenes Mar 12 '09 at 20:04
2  
Well then just replace 20em by 175px. The rest stays the same. –  Gumbo Mar 12 '09 at 20:41

Here you go - less lines than any misuse of table tags can provide:

<img
    src="http://sontag.ca/TheChallenge/tiles.gif"
    alt="nine assorted coloured rectangles"
/>

:P

share|improve this answer
    
You can even fit it in just one line! –  Gumbo Mar 12 '09 at 9:50
    
If necessary, yes, but this is more readable. :) –  Peter Boughton Mar 12 '09 at 10:04
1  
You forgot to use CSS... ;) –  E Dominique Mar 13 '09 at 10:04
    
No, I specifically avoided it, to make a point. –  Peter Boughton Mar 13 '09 at 10:23
8  
that's the correct solution from a developer!:) –  boj Apr 28 '09 at 19:22

This matches your table example exactly, including the vertically and horizontally centered text (which no one else has done so far).

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
	"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
	<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8"/>

	<title>Boxy Boxes in a Box</title>

	<style type="text/css" media="screen">
		#container {position: relative; margin: 100px auto; height: 175px; width: 175px; font-style: italic; }

		.box {width: 35px; height: 35px; position: absolute; text-align: center; line-height: 35px;}

		#box_1 {top: 0; left: 0; width: 140px; background-color: silver;}
		#box_2 {top: 0; right: 0; height: 140px; background-color: maroon; line-height: 140px;}
		#box_3 {top: 35px; left: 0; height: 140px; background-color: navy; line-height: 140px;}
		#box_4 {top: 35px; left: 35px; width: 70px; background-color: red;}
		#box_5 {top: 35px; right: 35px; height: 70px; background-color: blue; line-height: 70px;}
		#box_6 {top: 70px; left: 35px; height: 70px; background-color: yellow; line-height: 70px;}
		#box_7 {top: 70px; left: 70px; background-color: white;}
		#box_8 {bottom: 35px; right: 35px; width: 70px; background-color: green;}
		#box_9 {bottom: 0; right: 0; width: 140px; background-color: orange;}
	</style>
</head>

<body>
	<div id="container">
		<div id="box_1" class="box">1</div>
		<div id="box_2" class="box">2</div>
		<div id="box_3" class="box">3</div>
		<div id="box_4" class="box">4</div>
		<div id="box_5" class="box">5</div>
		<div id="box_6" class="box">6</div>
		<div id="box_7" class="box">7</div>
		<div id="box_8" class="box">8</div>
		<div id="box_9" class="box">9</div>
	</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Well done, you got there first. I've borrowed some ideas for my own answer. I've tried to make mine as concise as I can. –  Sam Hasler Mar 12 '09 at 0:58
    
(In case you've moved on and haven't noticed the updates to the question) are you going to update to follow the new rules? –  Sam Hasler Mar 13 '09 at 14:34
    
Eh, not really. I solved it as originally stated. I'm not going to blow 10 hours catering to random new rules every few hours. :) Your solution is better, anyways. –  Tyson Mar 13 '09 at 22:28
    
Sorry about the new rules but they are really not random. I would like to put the table solution and css solution side-by-side on the same web page. I did try your code, looks great, but the position:absolute gave me problems. If I missed something, let me know. –  Diogenes Mar 13 '09 at 23:28

As long as the widths and heights are constant, one can always use absolute positioning to get the same effect. This should be obvious enough, so that I don't have to type it out (it's late here and I'm lazy :P)

share|improve this answer

I took a slightly different approach than the "id everything" solutions I've seen so far. This comes in less than 100 chars more than the table based solution.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
 "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
<title>The Challenge</title>
<style type="text/css">
div {
    position:absolute;
    width:35px;
    height:35px;
    text-align:center;
    line-height:35px
}

.spiral { width:175px; height:175px }

.t { top:0 }
.l { left:0 }
.r { right:0 }
.b { bottom:0 }
.w { width:140px }
.h { height:140px; line-height:140px }
.c {
    top:35px;
    left:35px;
    width:105px;
    height:105px
}

.c .w { width:70px }
.c .h { height:70px; line-height: 70px }
.c .c { width:35px; height: 35px }
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="spiral">
    <div class="t l w" style="background-color:silver">1</div>
    <div class="t r h" style="background-color:maroon">2</div>
    <div class="b l h" style="background-color:navy">3</div>
    <div class="c">
    	<div class="t l w" style="background-color:red">4</div>
    	<div class="t r h" style="background-color:blue">5</div>
    	<div class="b l h" style="background-color:yellow">6</div>
    	<div class="c">7</div>
    	<div class="b r w" style="background-color:green">8</div>
    </div>
    <div class="b r w" style="background-color:orange">9</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Edit: Based on your modifications I'm posting a slightly more verbose but hopefully clearer solution that adds a black border, sets some text to white, and does not absolutely position the "garden".

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
 "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
<title>The Challenge</title>
<style type="text/css">
div {
    position:absolute;
    width:35px;
    height:35px;
    text-align:center;
    line-height:35px
}

div.spiral {
    position:relative;
    width:175px;
    height:175px;
    border: 1px solid #000
}

.top { top:0 }
.left { left:0 }
.right { right:0 }
.bottom { bottom:0 }
.wide { width:140px }
.tall { height:140px; line-height:140px }
.center {
    top:35px;
    left:35px;
    width:105px;
    height:105px
}

.center .wide { width:70px }
.center .tall { height:70px; line-height: 70px }
.center .center { width:35px; height: 35px }
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="spiral">
    <div class="top left wide" style="background-color:silver">1</div>
    <div class="top right tall" style="background-color:maroon">2</div>
    <div class="bottom left tall" style="background-color:navy;color:#fff">3</div>
    <div class="center">
        <div class="top left wide" style="background-color:red">4</div>
        <div class="top right tall" style="background-color:blue">5</div>
        <div class="bottom left tall" style="background-color:yellow">6</div>
        <div class="center">7</div>
        <div class="bottom right wide" style="background-color:green">8</div>
    </div>
    <div class="bottom right wide" style="background-color:orange">9</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Minified my own answer and by my count it's 180 characters less than the table solution: 1042 (table) to 858 (mine) characters not counting body/head/style tags. –  Sam Hasler Mar 12 '09 at 2:53
    
The floating solution is very elegant and compact, nice work Sam. I was going for something more in the spirit of css. This solution could be used to put multiple "tiles" on the same page without duplicating the css and I'm hoping that it is readable and easy to comprehend. –  Prestaul Mar 12 '09 at 14:04
    
I like your JSBin link, so I've put a version of my code with two tiles out there if anyone wants to play with it: jsbin.com/avive –  Prestaul Mar 12 '09 at 14:20
    
This is an interesting approach too, though I am having a little difficulty following it. Can you change your class names to something that better expresses intent? No penalty for the few extra characters but big points if the class names express intent and help in understanding. –  Diogenes Mar 12 '09 at 20:22
    
Ok... I've update with a new version that has clearer class names and fulfills your other new requests. New version here: jsbin.com/uzaba –  Prestaul Mar 13 '09 at 8:02

No one here has given a table solution yet, and The Challenge is all about comparing CSS layouts to Table based layouts in a controlled (and heavily biased) scenario.

So here is Ted's Table Layout solution and his challenge...

"With my table based solution, it is very easy to add new inhabitants to the garden plots by very simple additions to the HTML markup only! All inhabitants are automatically centered and spaced in a pleasing style. For example:"

alt text alt text

"As far as I can tell, no CSS based solutions here can accomodate new inhabitants without extensive renovations to the CSS rules."

"Better bring lots of money boys, I'm feeling really hungry and thirsty now."

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
   "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Terrible Ted's Table Layout</title>
<style type="text/css">

#master TD { text-align: center }
#master { 
  border: 1px solid black;
  font: italic 100%/200% 'Comic Sans MS', cursive; 
}
#silver { background-color:silver }
#maroon { background-color: maroon;  color:white }
#navy { background-color:navy;  color:white }
#red { background-color: red }
#blue { background-color:blue;  color:white }
#yellow { background-color: yellow }
#green { background-color:green;  color:white }
#orange { background-color:orange }
#white { background-color:white }

#silver, #red, #green, #orange, #white { height: 35px }
#maroon, #navy, #blue, #yellow, #white { width: 35px }

</style>
</head>
<body style="background-color:#ffb600">

<table id="master" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" 
  summary="layoutByTable"><tr>
    <td id="silver" colspan="2" > 1 </td> 
    <td id="maroon" rowspan="2" > 2 </td>
  </tr><tr>
  <td id="navy" rowspan="2" > 3 </td>
  <td>
    <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" 
      summary="inner"><tr>
        <td id="red" colspan="2" > 4 </td>
        <td id="blue" rowspan="2" > 5 </td>
      </tr><tr>
        <td id="yellow" rowspan="2" > 6 </td>
        <td id="white"> 7 </td>
      </tr><tr>
        <td id="green" colspan="2" > 8 </td>
      </tr>
    </table>
  </td>
</tr><tr>
 <td id="orange" colspan="2"> 9 </td>
</tr>
</table>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
are you using <br>s to get the 2, 3 & 5 characters to appear on separate lines? when I just add them with whitespace to your html they appear on the same line. See jsbin.com/acoge –  Sam Hasler Mar 13 '09 at 14:00
    
Yup - that qualifies as simple markup, right? –  Diogenes Mar 13 '09 at 17:52

Single table solution.

Now don't down-vote me.

I know this is not an answer to the original question.
I posted this answer because the OP requested it in a comment to the original question.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
    <head>
        <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
        <meta http-equiv="Content-language" content="en" />
        <title>The Challenge</title>
    </head>
    <body>

        <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0" summary="">
            <tr>
                <td colspan="4" height="35" align="center" bgcolor="silver"><i>1</i></td>
                <td rowspan="4" width="35" align="center" bgcolor="maroon"><i>2</i></td>
                <td rowspan="5" valign="bottom"><img src="http://sontag.ca/gif/grinch.gif" width="41" height="122" alt="Dr. Suess's Grinch"/></td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td rowspan="4" width="35" align="center" bgcolor="navy"><i>3</i></td>
                <td colspan="2" height="35" align="center" bgcolor="red"><i>4</i></td>
                <td rowspan="2" width="35" align="center" bgcolor="blue"><i>5</i></td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td rowspan="2" width="35" align="center" bgcolor="yellow"><i>6</i></td>
                <td width="35" height="35" align="center"><i>7</i></td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td colspan="2" height="35" align="center" bgcolor="green"><i>8</i></td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td colspan="4" height="35" align="center" bgcolor="orange"><i>9</i></td>
            </tr>
        </table>

    </body>
</html>

It is valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and I've included Dr. Suess character :)

By stripping Dr. Suess character, the <?xml declaration, the meta-tags and the summary attribute you could cut it down to 929 characters and still be valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional.

Edit

As requested, XHTML 1.0 Strict

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>The Challenge</title>
        <style type="text/css">
            BODY {background: orange}
            #garden {border: 1px solid black; color: black}
            #garden TD {
                font: italic 100% 'Comic Sans MS', cursive;
                height: 35px;
                padding: 0;
                text-align: center;
                width: 35px
            }
            #c1 {background: silver}
            #c2 {background: maroon; color: white}
            #c3 {background: navy;   color: white}
            #c4 {background: red}
            #c5 {background: blue;   color: white}
            #c6 {background: yellow}
            #c7 {background: white}
            #c8 {background: green;  color: white}
            #c9 {background: orange}
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>

        <table id="garden" cellspacing="0">
            <tr>
                <td id="c1" colspan="4">1</td>
                <td id="c2" rowspan="4">2</td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td id="c3" rowspan="4">3</td>
                <td id="c4" colspan="2">4</td>
                <td id="c5" rowspan="2">5</td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td id="c6" rowspan="2">6</td>
                <td id="c7">7</td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td id="c8" colspan="2">8</td>
            </tr><tr>
                <td id="c9" colspan="4">9</td>
            </tr>
        </table>

    </body>
</html>

970 non-whitespace characters, orange background, Dr. Suess's Grinch removed.

share|improve this answer
    
height, width and align attributes are not valid in XHTML. You need to specify these as separate CSS rules. It'll be a good exercise. See Ted's Table answer for tips on this. –  Diogenes Mar 13 '09 at 10:02
    
I'm curious about a what single table solution might reduce to when done as XHTML strict. –  Diogenes Mar 13 '09 at 10:05
    
Width and Height attributes are valid in Transitional. This one is not meant to be a solutions to your chalenge, but rather a single table example. That is why I did not use any css. Others are free to work it into strict :) –  Jacco Mar 13 '09 at 10:06
    
@Jacco - hey your new version cleaned up real good! So I concede to you on the table solution - yours is better. But I somehow think neither of our table solutions are going to win any votes here ;-) –  Diogenes Mar 14 '09 at 14:12
    
The 'right' solution depends entirely on the nature of the data to be displayed, is it tabular or not. (if it is visual only, Peter Boughton solutions is hard to beat) –  Jacco Mar 14 '09 at 16:11

Brevity of markup....

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
<head>
<title>The Challenge</title>
<style type="text/css">
	.garden {
		position: relative;
		width: 175px;
		height: 175px;
		font-family: 'Comic Sans MS', cursive;
		border: 1px solid;
		color: #000;
		}
	.garden div {
		position: absolute;
		width: 35px;
		height: 35px;
		line-height: 35px;
		text-align: center;
		}
	.garden div:first-child {
		width: 140px;
		background: silver;
		}
	.garden div:first-child + div {
		right: 0;
		height: 140px;
		line-height: 140px;
		color: #fff;
		background: maroon;
		}
	.garden div:first-child + div + div {
		top: 35px;
		height: 140px;
		line-height: 140px;
		color: #fff;
		background: navy;
		}
	.garden div:first-child + div + div + div {
		top: 35px;
		left: 35px;
		width: 70px;
		background: red;
		}
	.garden div:first-child + div + div + div + div {
		top: 35px;
		right: 35px;
		height: 70px;
		line-height: 70px;
		background: blue;
		}
	.garden div:first-child + div + div + div + div + div {
		top: 70px;
		left: 35px;
		height: 70px;
		line-height: 70px;
		background: yellow;
		}
	.garden div:first-child + div + div + div + div + div + div {
		top: 70px;
		left: 70px;
		background: white;
		}
	.garden div:first-child + div + div + div + div + div + div + div {
		top: 105px;
		left: 70px;
		width: 70px;
		background: green;
		}
	.garden div:first-child + div + div + div + div + div + div + div + div{
		bottom: 0;
		right: 0;
		width: 140px;
		background: orange;
		}

    </style> 
</head> 
<body> 
<div class="garden"> 
<div>1</div> 
<div>2</div> 
<div>3</div> 
<div>4</div> 
<div>5</div> 
<div>6</div> 
<div>7</div>
<div>8</div> 
<div>9</div> 
</div>
</body>
</html>

link

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting approach, but this won't work in IE6... –  Prestaul Mar 13 '09 at 8:00
    
Yeah, just wanted to spice things up a little –  Andy Ford Mar 13 '09 at 14:42
    
You can shorten your markup even further by using the "content: '';" CSS rule, too. –  Tyson Mar 13 '09 at 21:35
    
@Tyson - technically true, but presentation belongs in the CSS and content belongs in the HTML. @Presthaul - running with the 'garden' metaphor... I wouldn't want to plant my garden in such bad soil anyway –  Andy Ford Apr 28 '09 at 20:01
up vote 1 down vote accepted

alt text I first did this exercise a little over 2 years ago when I was first learning HTML and CSS. My first solution was like the one you see here, except without the anonymous container DIVs. Then I got this idea for a web page that did a side by side comparison of CSS to a Table to prove CSS was better. So I worked on The Challenge page, published it, and then posted this question.

Sam Hasler posted an answer within minutes, it seems, that was really close. I could see he was on track for a better solution than what I had. All his divs were in order, and mine were not. Jacco posted a comment asking why I used two nested tables when one would do. He was right too, of course.

So I had two Homer Simpson "Doh!" moments right away. I read other questions and answers on tables vs. CSS. Someone mentioned that tables centered vertically. My answer did not center vertically either, but I thought it might be possible. The whole point, after all, is to do everything a table can do and better. I had painted myself into a corner by now, looking like a fool, so I had to find an answer.

Eventually (am embarrassed to say how long it was) I came up with the solution below. I was then able to fulfill my original concept of a side-by-side comparison web page.

Here is an explanation of how it all works and why you should use CSS

Charlie's answer...


<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
 "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">

<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<title>Charlie's CSS layout</title>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" />
<style type="text/css">

#outer { 
  width:175px; height:175px; 
  text-align:center; 
  font: italic 100%/200% 'Comic Sans MS', cursive;  
  border: 1px solid black;
}
#inner { width: 105px }
#outer>DIV, #inner>DIV { float:left }
#outer>DIV>DIV, #inner>DIV>DIV 
{ display: table-cell;  vertical-align: middle }
#c2 { clear: right }
#c3, #c6 { clear: left }

#c1>DIV, #c4>DIV, #c7>DIV, #c8>DIV, #c9>DIV { height: 35px }
#c2>DIV, #c3>DIV, #c5>DIV, #c6>DIV, #c7>DIV { width:  35px }
#c2>DIV, #c3>DIV { height: 140px } 
#c1>DIV, #c9>DIV { width:  140px } 
#c5>DIV, #c6>DIV { height:  70px } 
#c4>DIV, #c8>DIV { width:   70px } 
#c2, #c6, #c7, #c8, #c9 { position:relative; top:-35px }
#c9 { left: 35px }

#c1 { background-color: silver }
#c2 { background-color: maroon; color: white }
#c3 { background-color: navy; color: white }
#c4 { background-color: red }
#c5 { background-color: blue; color: white }
#c6 { background-color: yellow }
#c7 { background-color: white }
#c8 { background-color: green; color: white }
#c9 { background-color: orange }

/* these rules are a HACK to center vertically in IE7 */
#outer>DIV>DIV, #inner>DIV>DIV { position:relative; }
#c1>DIV, #c4>DIV, #c7>DIV, #c8>DIV, #c9>DIV { top: 10% }
#c5>DIV { top: 0% } 
#c6>DIV { top: 30% }
#c2>DIV { top: 0% }
#c3>DIV { top: 15% }

</style>
</head>
<body>

<div id="outer">
  <div id="c1"><div> 1 </div></div>
  <div id="c3"><div>3<br/>3<br/>3</div></div>
  <div id="inner">
    <div id="c4"><div> 4 </div></div>
    <div id="c5"><div> 5<br/>5 </div></div>
    <div id="c6"><div> 6 </div></div>
    <div id="c7"><div> 7 </div></div>
    <div id="c8"><div> 8 </div></div>
  </div>
  <div id="c2"><div> 2<br/>2<br/>2<br/>2 </div></div>
  <div id="c9"><div> 9 9 9</div></div>
</div>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
kudos for getting vertical-align: middle to work, I tried and failed. –  Sam Hasler Mar 14 '09 at 11:55
    
Hmmm, using CSS to declare a DIV to be handled as if it was a table because you do not want to use a table... Feels like chasing your own tail. –  Jacco Mar 14 '09 at 13:59
1  
No, I wanted a DIV to center content vertically, a perfectly reasonable thing to ask for. My preference for using tables (or not) has nothing to do a with a need to center something in a box. –  Diogenes Mar 14 '09 at 14:21
    
Those hacks for vertical align aren't working for me in IE7. (I'm on vista if that makes a difference) –  Sam Hasler Mar 14 '09 at 19:19
    
The IE hacks won't automatically center content as the content changes and to be honest, I have no idea what how they work. If Vista is different, it would not be a big surprise. –  Diogenes Mar 15 '09 at 4:31

I think we've proved that there's more than one way to do this. The table tag and CSS are both viable options.

Rather than add another way to complete the challenge I'd just like to say that, whether it's easier or harder, simpler or more complex: tables in HTML should be used for displaying tabular data.

  • Tables are made for tabular data.
  • CSS is made for styling/presentation.
share|improve this answer

Here is an example that doesn't use absolute positioning, doesn't use table-cell, and is valid in IE6-8, FF, etc.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
    "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="en" lang="en">
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" />

<title>Terrible Ted's Table Layout</title>
<style type="text/css">
#box{border:1px solid #000; width:175px; height:175px; color:navy; font-family:"Comic Sans MS"; font-size:13px; font-style:italic; text-align:center;}

div {float:left}

#c1, #c3, #c4, #c7, #c8, #c9{height:35px; line-height:35px}
#c2, #c3{height:140px;line-height:140px}
#c5, #c6{height:70px; line-height:70px}

#c1, #c9{width:140px}
#c2, #c3, #c5, #c6, #c7{width:35px}
#c4, #c8{width:70px}

#c6, #c7 {margin-top:-35px}

#c1{background-color:silver}
#c2{background-color:maroon; float:right}
#c3{background-color:navy}
#c4{background-color:red}
#c5{background-color:blue}
#c6{background-color:yellow}
#c7{background-color:white}
#c8{background-color:green}
#c9{background-color:orange}

</style>
</head>
<body>
<div id="box">
<div id="c1">1</div>
<div id="c2">2</div>
<div id="c3">3</div>
<div id="c4">4</div>
<div id="c5">5</div>
<div id="c6">6</div>
<div id="c7">7</div>
<div id="c8">8</div>
<div id="c9">9</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

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