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int main()
{
    int i=3;
    (i << 1);
    cout << i; //Prints 3
}

I expected to get 6 because of shifting left one bit. Why does it not work?

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1  
Wow a lot of people are on-line tonight –  Nemo Jun 16 '11 at 5:20
    
His question brings all the programmers to the yard? –  greatwolf Jun 16 '11 at 5:21
5  
If you didn't get a compiler warning, you probably aren't using enough flags on your compilations. You should be told about 'statement with no effect' on the left-shift line, though somewhat to my surprise, G++ 4.6.0 did not complain about that - though when I rewrote it in C, GCC 4.6.0 did complain. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 16 '11 at 5:23
2  
You could get nicely confused by the difference between cout << i << 1 << endl; and cout << (i << 1) << endl; (and don't forget to put a newline at the end of your output). –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 16 '11 at 5:26
    
@Victor We usually get only an hour a day in the yard. –  jonsca Jun 16 '11 at 5:27
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7 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Because the bit shift operators return a value.

You want this:

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
     int i = 3;
     i = i << 1;
     std::cout << i;
}

The shift operators don't shift "in place". You might be thinking of the other version. If they did, like a lot of other C++ binary operators, then we'd have very bad things happen.

i <<= 1; 

int a = 3;
int b = 2;
a + b;    // value thrown away
a << b;   // same as above
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You should use <<= or the value is just lost.

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You need to assign i to the shifted value.

int main()
{
    int i=3;
    i <<= 1;
    cout << i; //Prints 3
}

Alternatively, you can use <<= as an assignment operator:

i <<= 1;
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Because you didn't assign the answer back to i.

i = i << 1;
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You're not assigning the value of the expression (i << 1); back to i.

Try:

i = i << 1;

Or (same):

i <<= 1;
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You need to reassign the value back to i with i<<=1 (using "left shift and assign operator")

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Reason: i << 1 produce an intermediate value which is not saved back to variable i.

// i is initially in memory
int i=3;

// load i into register and perform shift operation,
// but the value in memory is NOT changed
(i << 1);

// 1. load i into register and perform shift operation
// 2. write back to memory so now i has the new value
i = i << 1;

For your intention, you can use:

// equal to i = i << 1
i <<= 1;
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