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I want a regular expression in java that must contain at least a alphabet and a number at any position.It is for the password that contain the digits as well as numbers.

This should work for:

"1a1b23nh" Accepted

"bc112w" Accepted

"abc" Not accepted

"123" Not accepted

Special characters are not allowed.

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
(([a-z]+[0-9]+)+|(([0-9]+[a-z]+)+))[0-9a-z]*

How about a simple content check? Check if there are number(s) and character(s)

String input = "b45z4d";
boolean alpha = false;
boolean numeric = false;
boolean accepted = true;
for (int i = 0; i < input.length(); ++i)
{
    char c = input.charAt(i);
    if (Character.isDigit(c))
    {
        numeric = true;
    } else if (Character.isLetter(c))
    {
        alpha = true;
    } else
    {
        accepted = false;
        break;
    }
}

if (accepted && alpha && numeric)
{
    // Then it is correct
}
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This only checks lowercase characters... –  Nico Huysamen Jun 16 '11 at 6:06
    
there should be a way to set the Ignorecase flag in Java isn't there? –  jcomeau_ictx Jun 16 '11 at 6:08
1  
This doesn't work for 'bc112w'. –  Petar Ivanov Jun 16 '11 at 6:10
    
@fiver: Yes, indeed you are right. Is this better. Or am I still missing something? –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 16 '11 at 6:12
2  
haha, so you thank me but accept the answer I corrected, instead of mine :) –  Petar Ivanov Jun 16 '11 at 6:31
([0-9]+[a-zA-Z][0-9a-zA-Z]*)|([a-zA-Z]+[0-9][0-9a-zA-Z]*)
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I know that the question already have been answered, and accepted, but this is what I would do:

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("(?i)(?:((?:\\d+[a-z]+)|(?:[a-z]+\\d+))\\w*)");

Object[][] tests = new Object[][] {
        { "1a1b23nh", Boolean.valueOf(true) },
        { "bc112w", Boolean.valueOf(true) },
        { "abc", Boolean.valueOf(false) },
        { "123", Boolean.valueOf(false) }
};

for (Object[] test : tests) {
    boolean result = pattern.matcher((String)test[0]).matches();
    boolean expected = ((Boolean)test[1]).booleanValue();
    System.out.print(test[0] + (result ? "\t " : "\t not ") + "accepted"); 
    System.out.println(result != expected ? "\t test failed" : "");
}
System.out.println("\nAll checks have been executed");

(?i) makes the regexp case insensitive.

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This is Python, same pattern ought to work in Java:

>>> import re
>>> re.compile('[0-9a-z]*[0-9][0-9a-z]*[a-z][0-9a-z]*|[0-9a-z]*[a-z][0-9a-z]*[0-9][0-9a-z]*', re.I)
<_sre.SRE_Pattern object at 0x830fbd0>
>>> p=_
>>> for s in '1a1b23nh', 'bc112w', 'abc', '123':
...  print s, p.match(s)
... 
1a1b23nh <_sre.SRE_Match object at 0xb73a3d78>
bc112w <_sre.SRE_Match object at 0xb73a3d78>
abc None
123 None

on 2nd thought, better add '$' at the end, or it will match 'ab12/'

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sorry for the javascript example I would break it down to avoid a hard to read regex.

function valid(s) {
  return /^[a-z0-9]+$/i.test(s) &&
         /[a-z]+/i.test(s) &&
         /[0-9]+/.test(s)
}

valid('123a87') ; //# =>  true
valid('A982') ; //# =>  true
valid('$54 ') ; //# =>  false
valid('123') ; //# =>  false
valid('abd') ; //# =>  false
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