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The following link_to statement:

  <%= link_to image_tag("icons/document_24.png"),
              [program_code.program, program_code],
              :class      => :no_hover,
              :alt        => "Print Tracking Code",
              :title      => "Print Tracking Code",
              :target     => :new
  %>

will generate a url like /programs/1/program_codes/1

If I want the url to be /programs/1/program_codes/1.svg, how do I specify the format in the array that is being passed to url_for? I've searched the Rails API documentation and looked at several examples but have been unable to find anything like this.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think your looking for the :format option. It will append the file extension to the link e.g. '.svg'

Make sure you put the :format option in the path building hash of the link_to method.

<%= link_to 'somewhere', {somewhere_to_path(@var), :format => "svg"},:title => "Print Tracking Code", :target => "_blank" %>

Hope this helps.

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I got that from the docs, but if you look at my example, there is an array passed to url_for (due to nested resources), which is what is hanging me up. I've tried, passing :format => "svg" and :format => :svg within the array and outside it and it doesn't seem to work either way. Very confusing. –  MikeH Jun 16 '11 at 13:07
1  
Is there a reason your not using a named route? then you could have somthing like {program_code_path(program_code.program, program_code), :format => "svg"} –  Barlow Jun 17 '11 at 2:48
    
I'll have to try that. This code was written by a pro Ruby firm, so not sure why named routes were not used--most of the code they wrote is pristine otherwise, so I assumed there must be a reason they did it this way that I just didn't understand yet. –  MikeH Jun 18 '11 at 2:34

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