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I have my unixodbc odbc.ini configure file like this:

[test]
Driver = /usr/local/lib/libmyodbc5-5.1.8.so
Description = Connector/ODBC 5.1.8 Driver DSN
SERVER = 127.0.0.1
PORT = 3306
USER = root
Password =
DATABASE = test
OPTION =
SOCKET =

And the problem is that it will not use the database as specified above, which is 'test'.

What I have to do is to manually execute a direct sql to change to database and run my query:

SQLExecDirect(stmt, "USE test", SQL_NTS);
SQLExecDirect(stmt, "SELECT * FROM mytable", SQL_NTS);

Any idea on how should I get rid of the 'USE test' which is a mysql command. Why is unixodbc not setting 'test' as the default db since it's already specified in the conf file?

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2 Answers 2

As on windows the driver manager (unixODBC in this case) only acts on the Driver tag, all other entries in the DSN are up to the driver to interpret. It doesn't notice there is a database= entry and know by magic that in this driver it should execute a "USE" command, and for another call SQLSetConnectAttr( SQL_ATTR_CURRENT_CATALOG ).

On my copy of the MySQL driver, it certainly uses the database= entry. However, I would check that 1. The copy of the driver you are using is built to use the unixODBC lib to access the shared config file (libodbcinst.so), or the driver is reading it directly, and is reading the same ini file as unixODBC. Possibly check with strace to see what ini is opened after the driver is loaded. Maybe try setting ODBCINI=/path/to/your/odbc.ini

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[test]
Driver = /usr/local/lib/libmyodbc5-5.1.8.so
Description = Connector/ODBC 5.1.8 Driver DSN
SERVER = 127.0.0.1
PORT = 3306
USER = root
Password =
**DATABASE** = test
**OPTION** = **3**
**SOCKET** =

and can change options between 1,2 too

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