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Hy!

I have a parentclass, and when I make a new object, the i want to pass a reference to the parentclass. (I have to use the parentclass things in the new object)

I use the constructor to make this object and pass the reference value. (thats important for me)

But I see when I use =& operator then it makes a new instance of the parentclass, what call the constructor, and then it's fall an endless recursion.

Here's my code:

<?php

abstract class MainClass {

    function __construct(&$parent){
        $this->parent =& $parent;
        $this->init();
    }

    abstract protected function init(); 

}

class ParentClass extends MainClass {   

    protected function init(){
        $this->child = new ChildClass($this);
    }

}

class ChildClass extends MainClass {

    protected function init(){}

}


$parent = new ParentClass (new stdClass());
var_dump($parent);

?>

And the result:

object(ParentClass)#1 (2) {
  ["parent"]=>
   object(stdClass)#2 (0) {
  }
  ["child"]=>
   object(ChildClass)#3 (1) {
     ["parent"]=>
     object(ParentClass)#1 (2) {
       ["parent"]=>
       object(stdClass)#2 (0) {
       }
       ["child"]=>
       object(ChildClass)#3 (1) {
         ["parent"]=>
         *RECURSION*
       }
     }
   }
 }

Somebody have any idea how can i solve this problem?

THNX!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Objects are passed by reference by default. There is no reason to pass or assign the $parent by reference. So this should be sufficient:

abstract class MainClass {

    function __construct($parent){
        $this->parent = $parent;
        $this->init();
    }

It might be important to you to use &$parent, but it is totally unnecessary.


Regarding the recursion: There is no recursion in your code, it is recursion in the output.

This part:

object(ChildClass)#3 (1) {                // <--- the same element
    ["parent"]=>
    object(ParentClass)#1 (2) {
      ["parent"]=>
      object(stdClass)#2 (0) {
      }
      ["child"]=> 
      object(ChildClass)#3 (1) {          // <--- the same element
        ["parent"]=>
        *RECURSION*
      }
    }
  }

would be printed over and over again, because the child has a reference to its parent and the parent a reference to its child.

Maybe even more obvious are the repeating numbers in the output:

object(ParentClass)#1            // 1
  object(stdClass)#2             // 2
  object(ChildClass)#3           // 3
    object(ParentClass)#1        // 1
      object(stdClass)#2         // 2
      object(ChildClass)#3       // 3
        // what would be here? right, object(ParentClass)#1 again

This is normal, there is no problem.

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You're right! Another function makes the endless loop in my code. In this case, there's no recursion. Thanks! –  SadAir Jun 16 '11 at 8:24
1  
+1, but a small correction: objects are not passed by reference. They behave more like resources where the variable only contains a reference to the object it's holding, but it's not a reference itself. The difference might sound trivial, but the impact is quite big; if objects were passed by reference then the following code would work differently: ideone.com/04PNf –  reko_t Jun 16 '11 at 8:29
    
@reko: I see your point, you are right. I'm a bit careless in this regard ;) –  Felix Kling Jun 16 '11 at 8:36

Better design.

You shouldn't need a reference to the parent class. If there are methods that need something like that, then they should be static methods that cover all child objects.

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