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In every example I've seen, extended classes implement the interfaces of their parents. For reference, the following example:

interface MyInterface{
    public function foo();
    public function bar();
}

abstract class MyAbstract implements MyInterface{
    public function foo(){ /* stuff */ }
    public function bar(){ /* stuff */ }
}

// what i usually see
class MyClass extends MyAbstract implements MyInterface{}

// what i'm curious about
class MyOtherClass extends MyAbstract{}

Is failure to implement an interface in a child, which is implemented by a parent, considered bad practice or something? Are there any technical drawbacks to omitting the implementation in the child?

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1  
you didnt look at my examples then –  Gordon Jun 16 '11 at 8:39
    
@Gordon - No sir, I have not. So I assume you typically omit the interface from child class declarations. –  Dan Lugg Jun 16 '11 at 8:41
    
yes, exactly. The child will implement that interface anyway. See codepad.org/OTZ2J5kB –  Gordon Jun 16 '11 at 8:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I would consider that you are on the right path. There is no need to declare that you are implementing the interface, when extending a class that already implements it. For me it's just another piece of code to maintain if change is needed. So, yes, you are correct!

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Thanks Emil Ivanov; That's what I assumed. I haven't worked much with interfaces (beyond SPL, et al.) and am beginning to incorporate them into my projects, as more and more of my code will be touched by client programmers. My main concern was if any changes to inheritance could occur due to omission. –  Dan Lugg Jun 16 '11 at 8:44

Is failure to implement an interface in a child, which is implemented by a parent, considered bad practice or something? Are there any technical drawbacks to omitting the implementation in the child?

I just can't answer your question better than this guy has:

By their nature, although sometimes they may look quite similar, abstract classes and class interfaces serve very distinct purposes.

The interface of a class is meant as a tool for the "user" of that class. An interface is a public presentation for the class, and it should advertise, to anyone considering to use it, what methods and constants are available and accessible from the outside. So, as it name suggests, it always sits between the user and the class implementing it.

On the other hand, an abstract class is a tool aimed at helping the "implementor" of the classes that extend it. It is an infrastructure that can impose restrictions and guidelines about what the concrete classes should look like. From a class design perspective, abstract classes are more architecturally important than interfaces. In this case, the implementor sits between the abstract class and the concrete one, building the latter on top of the former.

Reference

Thus, it's up to you to decide, based on who is going to use (instantiate) your classes, and who is going to write them. If you are the sole user and writer of your classes, then, maybe, just maybe, you don't need them both. But, if you want to give everyone a stripped down to core bits blueprint for the class writer(s) and class user(s), then you should consider using both abstracting and implementing.

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Is failure to implement an interface in a child, which is implemented by a parent, considered bad practice or something?

The child always implements the interface, it can not go around with this.

I have no clue if that is bad practice or something. I would say it's a language feature.

Are there any technical drawbacks to omitting the implementation in the child?

You can not test the reflection of the abstract class for having the interface for example.

However, abstract class are already an interface, so technically they themselves not really need the interface but you can do so to keep things fluid within the inheritance.

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