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Coming to Python from having been accustomed to C, I find that when I write Python code I seem to want to always but blank lines after each functional block, for example:

try:

   stuff
   more stuff

   if:

      do stuff
      more stuff

   elif:

      stuff

 etc.

I think it's because in C I use the "Allman Style" brace convention. I'm wondering if this constitutes a major violation of Python's style conventions? I find that, at least for me, it can make the code easier to read, at the expense of making functions less vertically compact.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

From PEP 8:

Blank Lines

Separate top-level function and class definitions with two blank lines.

Method definitions inside a class are separated by a single blank line.

Extra blank lines may be used (sparingly) to separate groups of related functions. Blank lines may be omitted between a bunch of related one-liners (e.g. a set of dummy implementations).

Use blank lines in functions, sparingly, to indicate logical sections.

Python accepts the control-L (i.e. ^L) form feed character as whitespace; Many tools treat these characters as page separators, so you may use them to separate pages of related sections of your file. Note, some editors and web-based code viewers may not recognize control-L as a form feed and will show another glyph in its place.

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1  
Verily, I shall do as the good book says. :) –  Bitrex Jun 16 '11 at 9:38

From the Python style guide PEP 8:

Use blank lines in functions, sparingly, to indicate logical sections.

So don't do this, please! For me, it definitely reduces the readability.

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I agree with Sven and I'd like to add my two cents: If you are using blank lines to indicate logical sections in a function maybe you should split up your function in smaller ones. –  olivecoder Jun 20 '14 at 10:07

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