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Let's say I have the following string:

here is some text in a sentence 55 and some other text still in the same sentence

There are two instances of the substring sentence in the string. How can I find the instance that is closest to the substring 55?

I am using Ruby 1.9.2

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Hmmmm. That's a tough one. How about this? (1) find the index -- the position -- of the string "55"; (2) find the index of the first "sentence"; (3) find the index of the second "sentence"; (4) compare the positions of the two "sentence" strings to the position of the "55" string. Whichever of the two compares gives the smallest difference, well, that's gotta' be the closer one. D'ya think something like that could work for ya'? –  Pete Wilson Jun 16 '11 at 9:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Split the string on the marker:

first, last = str.split("55")

Distance from the second is simply via #index:

last_dist = last.index("sentence")

Distance from the first is slightly funkier:

first_dist = first.reverse.index("sentence".reverse")

Compare:

result = first_dist < last_dist ? :first : :last
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Elegant solution. –  sawa Jun 16 '11 at 13:31
str = "here is some text in a sentence 55 and some other text still in the same sentence"
t = str.index('55')
p [str.index('sentence', t), str.rindex('sentence', t)].min_by{|pos| (pos-t).abs}
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I think this does not return the correct indices. For the 'sentence' that is to the left of 55, you have to subtract 'sentence'.length from it. For the 'sentence' to the right, you have to subtract '55'.length. –  sawa Jun 16 '11 at 13:27
    
Are you sure? It prints 23, which is what it was meant to do. –  steenslag Jun 16 '11 at 14:37
    
(str.index('sentence', t)-t).abs will give the distance from the beginning of 55 to the beginning of sentence. (str.rindex('sentence', t)-t).abs will give the distance from the beginning of sentence to the beginning of 55. My interpretation is that, a distance is the length of the string that splits the two strings on its both sides. –  sawa Jun 16 '11 at 14:50

More common solution for more than two substrings:

str = "text sub text text sub key text sub"
positions = []
last_pos = nil
key_pos = str.index('key')

while (last_pos = str.index('sub', (last_pos ? last_pos + 1 : 0)))
  positions << last_pos
end

p positions.map{|p| (p-key_pos).abs}.min
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