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Say I have the following:

public class A {
  //stuff
  public class B implements I {}
}

public interface I {}

public class Foo {
  int bar(I i) {}
}

Now why does Java give me a build error of 'not applicable for type...' when I try to pass an instance of B to Foo.bar() inside the body of class A?

Is the inner class not considered a proper implementation of I because it is contained inside a top-level class?

Cheers, Dave.

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hwo are you instantiating B? –  Andreas Petersson Jun 16 '11 at 9:42
4  
If included the call to Foo.bar and the compiler error message, people will be able to help better. –  Burleigh Bear Jun 16 '11 at 9:42
    
Right now I'm simply calling I i = new B(); I'm guessing it forces you to say I i = A.B() or similar...? –  f1dave Jun 16 '11 at 9:47
    
new Foo().bar(new A().new B()); –  Prince John Wesley Jun 16 '11 at 9:48
    
call : I i = new A().new B(); –  Prince John Wesley Jun 16 '11 at 9:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need a Instance of class A, before you can create a instance of object B (because B is a inner class of A). Try this code:

Foo foo = new Foo();
A a = new A();
B b = a.new B();
foo.bar(b);
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That works, but is just horrible. Inner classe instances should really only be created from their containing instance (like @aioobe did in his example). –  Thilo Jun 16 '11 at 9:50
    
yep, cheers. I'd confused myself because the code I'm editing isn't quite as simple as the example above - the A.B type is inside a list, etc. The design of the class isn't fit for its purpose anyway, so time for some refactoring. Cheers. –  f1dave Jun 16 '11 at 9:51
    
Yes, you are right - it is horrible. But it explains the problem, i think. –  Lodger Jun 16 '11 at 9:52

I suspect you may have two different I interfaces. Make sure you import the same ones in both files.

This is the exact error you get (from Eclipse) if you accidentally use two different interfaces with the same name.

The method bar(I) in the type Foo is not applicable for the arguments (A.B)

For reference, this compiles fine for me:

class A {
    // stuff
    public void test() {
        new Foo().bar(new B());
    }

    public class B implements I {
    }
}

interface I {
}

class Foo {
    int bar(I i) {
        return 0;    // note that you need a return value for it to compile.
    }
}
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Ok, ignore the obvious ;) That's not the issue... talking more about the inner class instantiation. –  f1dave Jun 16 '11 at 9:43
    
Sure. Updated the answer. –  aioobe Jun 16 '11 at 9:46
    
One note, if you are going to use B only in the bar() method, then probaly the better approach is to use anonymous inner class: new Foo().bar(new I(){}); –  Alexandr Jun 16 '11 at 9:52

In your code, B has an inplicit reference to A, so you need an A (the this inside a method of A, of a new A() outside the context of A) If in your application B is an I in the namespace of A without actually using the implicit reference between B and A, you should declare the inner class static:

public class A {
  //stuff
  public static class B implements I {}
}

public interface I {}

public class Foo {
  int bar(I i) {}
}

Now the following should work:

Foo foo = new Foo();
B b = new A.B();
foo.bar(b);
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