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I have a file which has a list of SQL Server databases. I want to remove the 4 system databases, [master,model,msdb,tempdb] from the file. How can I do that?

Server1
[DB1]
[DB2]
[DB3]
[master]
[model]
[msdb]
[tempdb]
Server2
[DB1]
[DB2]
[DB3]
[master]
[model]
[msdb]
[tempdb]
Server3
[DB1]
[DB2]
[DB3]
[master]
[model]
[msdb]
[tempdb]
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

One option is to use -notcontains

 $system = "[master]","[model]","[msdb]","[tempdb]"
 $new_file = @(get-content db_list.txt |
   where {$system -notcontains $_})
 $new_file | out-file db_list.txt -force
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Thanks mjolinor! – Nanda Jun 16 '11 at 12:11
(Get-Content.\db.txt) | where {$_ -notmatch '^\[master|model|msdb|tempdb\]$'} | Out-File .\db.txt
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Enumerate the file and check that the item doesn't matc a regexp. This is quite much like yi_H's grep -v example works.

# dbs is here an array, but anything enumerable works.
$dbs = @("[DB1]", "[DB2]", "[DB3]", "[master]", "[model]", "[msdb]", "[tempdb]", "Server2", "[DB1]", "[DB2]", "[DB3]", "[master]", "[model]", "[msdb]", "[tempdb]", "Server3", "[DB1]", "[DB2]", "[DB3]", "[master]", "[model]", "[msdb]", "[tempdb]")

$dbs | ? {!($_ -match "\[(master)|(model)|(msdb)|(tempdb)\]")}
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if you only want to remove lines:

grep -v -E '^\[(master|model|msdb|tempdb)\]'

if you want to remove the whole block:

perl -0133 -ne 'if ($_ !~ /^(master|model|msdb|tempdb)/) { print "["; print substr($_, 0, -1) }'
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2  
Nice for Unix-y, but doesn't work in Powershell. – vonPryz Jun 16 '11 at 11:31

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