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a = {"a" => 100, "b" => 200, "c" => 300}

b = a.map{|k,v| v = v + 10}

is returning an array, i need to change the values of a hash by call by reference

I am expecting the following output

{"a" => 110, "b" => 210, "c" => 310}

Thanks

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2  
unless perfomance is an issue, consider non-destructive functional solutions (each -> map). I think what you need here is a fmap for Hash (though useful, functors is a FP concept hardly seen in Ruby). –  tokland Jun 16 '11 at 12:06
    
@tokland: What's a fmap? –  Andrew Grimm Jun 16 '11 at 23:33
1  
@Andrew: fmap is a generalization of map for functors (something we can iterate over). It's commonly seen in Haskell, check for example learnyouahaskell.com/functors-applicative-functors-and-monoids. For Ruby, check this example: code.google.com/p/tokland/wiki/RubyAlgebraicDataTypes, I wrote a Tree#fmap in adt_tree.rb. Also, check my comment in d11wtq's answer. –  tokland Jun 17 '11 at 8:48
    
@tokland: Nice. You may want to talk about fmap as an answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/5738065/… , though Ed'ka has made a comment mentioning fmap. –  Andrew Grimm Jun 17 '11 at 11:32
    
@Andrew, done, I added an answer with my 2-cents. –  tokland Jun 17 '11 at 13:30

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Maybe you can do something like this:

a.keys.each do |key| a[key] += 10 end
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yeah, this is better than mine (+1) –  jaydel Jun 16 '11 at 11:32
    
fine, great job.. thanks :) –  Sreeraj Jun 16 '11 at 11:36
    
@jaydel: actually yours is "better" because a.keys builds an intermediate array. –  tokland Jun 16 '11 at 12:13
    
@tokland also this solution is touching original hash –  fl00r Jun 16 '11 at 12:31
    
@fl00r: yeah, I know. But I mean, if you are going the ugly imperative way, it's better to use Array#each_key. Personally I would create a new hash without hesitation (unless "a" is humongous). (edit) Now that I check the question, the OP wants a new "b", so d11wtq's is definitely the way to go. –  tokland Jun 16 '11 at 13:07

Here's my non-mutating one-liner :P

Hash[original_hash.map { |k,v| [k, v+10] }]

Gotta love ruby one-liners :)

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1  
+1 for the functional solution. You can generalize it as a fmap: class Hash def fmap(&block) Hash[self.map(&block)] end end x = {:a => 1, :b => 2}.fmap { |k, v| [k.to_s, v*2] } p x #{"a"=>2, "b"=>4} –  tokland Jun 16 '11 at 12:03
a.each_pair do |x,y| a[x] += 10 end
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1  
With this approach use Hash#each_key. –  tokland Jun 16 '11 at 12:13

Reality check:

require "benchmark"
include Benchmark

h0, h1, h2, h3, h4 = (0..4).map { Hash[(0..1000).map{ |i| [i,i] }] }

bm do |x|
  x.report("0") { 1000.times { h0.each_key{ |k| h0[k] += 10 } } }
  x.report("1") { 1000.times { h1.keys.each{ |k| h1[k] += 10 } } }
  x.report("2") { 1000.times { Hash[h2.map { |k,v| [k, v+10] }] } }
  x.report("3") { 1000.times { h3.inject({}){ |h,(k,v)| h[k] = v + 10; h } } }
  x.report("4") { 1000.times { h4.inject({}){ |h,(k,v)| h.update( k => v + 10) } } }
end

      user     system      total        real
0  0.490000   0.000000   0.490000 (  0.540795)
1  0.490000   0.010000   0.500000 (  0.545050)
2  1.210000   0.010000   1.220000 (  1.388739)
3  1.570000   0.010000   1.580000 (  1.660317)
4  2.460000   0.010000   2.470000 (  3.057287)

Imperative programming wins.

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+1 for doing some research (but which implementation did you run it on?), but if you're modifying an object that you didn't create (eg it's a method parameter) then you may wish to avoid the imperative approach. –  Andrew Grimm Jun 16 '11 at 23:37
    
@Andrew Grimm Ruby Enterprise 1.8.7, I prefer functional approach, but good looking code is too often slower, so I made a habit of doing benchmarks every time. –  Victor Moroz Jun 17 '11 at 17:16

Dude change the map with each and you are good to go :)

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I believe in every Ruby question inject should be presented :D

b = a.inject({}){ |h,(k,v)| h[k] = v + 10; h }
#=> {"a"=>110, "b"=>210, "c"=>310}
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2  
Inject is cool, but sometimes its usage shadows a more specific functional construction (because "everything" can be written as a fold...). Here a hash creation (Hash[pairs]) seems more natural (the hoped-for Enumerable#mash would be even better). Notice that it can be written: a.inject({}){ |h,(k,v)| h.update(k => v + 10) } –  tokland Jun 16 '11 at 13:15
    
@tokland, thanks, good notice! –  fl00r Jun 16 '11 at 13:20
    
Wouldn't each_with_object be more applicable here? –  Andrew Grimm Jun 16 '11 at 23:38
    
@Andrew: indeed. Though personally I don't like each_with_object because it encourages in-place modifications (with inject you're free to do it or not) –  tokland Jun 17 '11 at 8:54
1  
Just as a curiosity, I found this answer from Jörg (stackoverflow.com/questions/3833372/…) where uses folding/reduce/inject to implement every method in Enumerable. –  tokland Jun 17 '11 at 12:27

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