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I'm wondering if MySQL takes collation into account when generating an index, or if the index is generated the same regardless of collation, the collation only being taken into account when later traversing that index.

For my purposes, I'd like to use the collation utf8_unicode_ci on a field. I know this particular collation has a relatively high performance penalty, but it's still important to me to use it.

I have an index on that field which is being used to satisfy an ORDER BY clause, retrieving the rows in order quickly (avoiding a filesort). However, I'm not sure whether using this collation is going to affect the speed of rows as they are read back from the index, or if the index stores data in an already-normalised state according to that collation, allowing for the performance penalty to be entirely in generating the index and not reading it back.

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what operation are you using the index for? order by? single key lookup? range lookup? –  ʞɔıu Mar 12 '09 at 2:54
    
Index is being used for ORDER BY. Thanks –  thomasrutter Mar 12 '09 at 3:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I believe that the btree structure will be different because it has to compare the column values differently.

Look at these two query plans:

mysql> explain select * from sometable where keycol = '3';
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref   | rows | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | pro   | ref  | PRIMARY       | PRIMARY | 66      | const |   34 | Using where; Using index | 
+----+-------------+-------+------+---------------+---------+---------+-------+------+--------------------------+


mysql> explain select * from sometable where binary keycol = '3';
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+--------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows  | Extra                    |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+--------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | pro   | index | NULL          | PRIMARY | 132     | NULL | 14417 | Using where; Using index | 
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+--------------------------+

If we change the collation for the comparison, suddenly it isn't even able to seek the index anymore and has to scan every row. The actual values stored in the index will be the same regardless of collation, for instance, because it will still return the value in its original casing regardless of whether it's using a case sensitive or case insensitive collation.

So lookups against a case insensitive collation should be a little less efficient.

However, I doubt you'd ever be able to notice the difference; note that MySQL makes everything case insensitive by default, so the impact can't be that terrible.

UPDATE:

You can see a similar effect for order by operations:

mysql> explain select * from sometable order by keycol collate latin1_general_cs;
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-----------------------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows  | Extra                       |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-----------------------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | pro   | index | NULL          | PRIMARY | 132     | NULL | 14417 | Using index; Using filesort | 
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-----------------------------+

mysql> explain select * from sometable order by keycol ;
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
| id | select_type | table | type  | possible_keys | key     | key_len | ref  | rows  | Extra       |
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-------------+
|  1 | SIMPLE      | pro   | index | NULL          | PRIMARY | 132     | NULL | 14417 | Using index | 
+----+-------------+-------+-------+---------------+---------+---------+------+-------+-------------+

Note the extra 'filesort' stage required to execute the query. That means mysql is queuing up the result in a temporary buffer and sorting it itself using a quicksort in an extra stage, throwing out whatever the index order was. Using the original collation this step is uneccessary as mysql knows the order from index initially.

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Thanks - so if I understand correctly, the ordering of items in the b-tree is affected by collation even though the actual values are preserved, so ORDER BY can still be efficient when using that collation. Let me know if I've misunderstood. –  thomasrutter Mar 12 '09 at 4:03
    
I think you've got it right. –  ʞɔıu Mar 12 '09 at 4:35
    
Ah I guess that 'using filesort' tells me what I needed to know. So was the actual collation of that column case insensitive? I guess at this point I ought to just test it out myself... –  thomasrutter Mar 12 '09 at 4:48
    
yes, the original was ci –  ʞɔıu Mar 12 '09 at 4:49
    
Yep. Tried with column collation of latin1_swedish_ci and "COLLATE latin1_general_cs" and yep that forces it into a filesort. Accepted. –  thomasrutter Mar 12 '09 at 4:54

MySQL will use the collation of the column for the index. So if you make a utf8_unicode_ci field, then the index will also be in utf8_unicode_ci order effectively.

Keep in mind that using the index will not always 100% bypass the performance impact, but for most practical purposes it will.

Many database systems aren't CPU bound, so I doubt you would notice the impact.

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Thanks for the answer. –  thomasrutter Mar 12 '09 at 4:06

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