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I have the following code:

try
{
    string fileName = imageQueue.Dequeue();
    FileStream fileStream = File.Open(
        fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None);
    Bitmap bitmap = new Bitmap(fileStream);
    Image picture = (Image)bitmap;
    pb.Tag = fileName;
    pb.Image = picture;
    return true;
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    errorCount++;
    //If another PC has this image open it will error
    return false;
}

Because this program is running on 2 PC's accessing the same folder to pick files up it will throw an exception when one has a file open and then move onto the next file in its list.

When I open the application on 2 PC's at the same time the first PC manages to open the image but the second doesn't. I am displaying 4 images at once on screen but doing some debugging shows that the second PC is taking 10.5 seconds to fail at opening 4 files before it finds one it can open.

Why is this so expensive and what can I do to speed it up?

UPDATE: I give it exclusive access because I want the applications to show unique images so PC1 shows image 1,2,3,4 and PC shows 5,6,7,8 because it cant get acccess to 1,2,3,4. I also then free the filestream once I'm done with it and at the last possible moment so it prevents other applications trying to open it.

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1  
Do you need to have the files open with ReadWrite access? If not consider having them us Read access and then changing the FileShare enumeration to use Read. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.fileshare.aspx –  Brian Dishaw Jun 16 '11 at 12:19
2  
Also, consider wrapping the FileStream fileStream = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None); is a using ( ) { } block to help free up the resources as soon as it's done. –  Brian Dishaw Jun 16 '11 at 12:20
1  
2.6 seconds to fail at opening a locked file is excessive. This must be environmental. Hard to guess what that might be. –  Hans Passant Jun 16 '11 at 12:50
    
You really don't want to be holding onto a file stream as a method of mutexing, it gives you unexpected results like waiting 10.5 seconds before the second task opens a file... try using a control file (or db table) which each process can read to find out what the other process is doing and write to tell the other process what is allowed. –  Patrick Jun 16 '11 at 15:05
    
@Patrick Does that really help? How do you avoid races? –  David Heffernan Jun 16 '11 at 19:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can't answer definitively, but my best suggestion is that something in the system, either in the .net framework classes or the file system, is implementing a timeout/retry mechanism in case of file sharing failures. This would explain the inordinate delay you report.

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I can't allow the second PC to display the same as the first hence why I give it exclusive access. –  Jon Jun 16 '11 at 12:22
    
Please add that detail to your question. –  David Heffernan Jun 16 '11 at 12:24
    
Thanks, question updated. Onto the solution, hmmmmmm.... –  Jon Jun 16 '11 at 12:26
    
I need the exclusive access though so another application doesnt open the same file. Each instance of the application needs to show unique images from the same folder. –  Jon Jun 16 '11 at 12:37
    
@Jon I understand your question now, did you read my updated answer? –  David Heffernan Jun 16 '11 at 12:39

You are opening the file as FileAccess.ReadWrite (you don't appear to be writing). You tell it that you don't want to share the file, FileShare.None, (so the first PC to get the file wins).

Also, you never close the stream. So the PC that gets the file first holds on to it until the garbage collector closes the stream for you. When you get your stream wrap it in a using block so that the file is closed automatically:

using (FileStream fileStream = File.Open(fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None)
{
    // Do stuff with the filestream
}
// The stream will be closed when the closing brace is passed.
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I can't allow the second PC to display the same as the first hence why I give it exclusive access. I then close the filestream later on when I'm done –  Jon Jun 16 '11 at 12:23

After Edit

Since you want them to be locked you might consider rolling a light weight database (sqllite, xml, etc) that you could use to flag a file as "in use". Then in the method you would check to see if it's in use. This will eliminate having to wait for File.Open to timeout when trying to open a locked file.

Original

I guess I should have answered instead of commenting...

try
{
    string fileName = imageQueue.Dequeue();
    using( FileStream fileStream = File.Open( fileName, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.Read) )
    {
        Bitmap bitmap = new Bitmap(fileStream);
        Image picture = (Image)bitmap;
        pb.Tag = fileName;
        pb.Image = picture;
    }

    return true;
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    errorCount++;
    //If another PC has this image open it will error
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The application polls a directory for new files so it would need to do inserts somehow and when would you update a column to say its in use, once the File hasn't thrown an exception because that will still give the timing issues. –  Jon Jun 16 '11 at 12:40
    
Before process1 opens the file you check to see if the file is in use, you then update the db to say the file is in use (this operation needs to fail gracefully if process2 has claimed the same file at the same time) and then the process1 can start using the file –  Patrick Jun 16 '11 at 15:10

Have you tried experimenting with these stream properties? You may be able to minimize the timeout, if nothing else:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/470w48b4.aspx

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