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I have a timer routine I want to execute every two hours. But my logic below seem to execute too early than expected. Does anyone know what I am doing wrong?

         (new Timer()).scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimerTask()
          {

            @Override
            public void run()
            {

              try
              {                  
               //TODO: Perform routine.
              }
              catch (Exception ex)
              {
                try
                {
                  throw ex;
                }
                catch (Exception e)
                {

                }
              }
            }

          }, 0, (1000 * 60 * 120));

Thanks.

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7  
Your try-catch looks pretty bad... –  Martijn Courteaux Jun 16 '11 at 12:59
    
What do you mean by 'too early' ? –  GhiOm Jun 16 '11 at 13:00
2  
Though this won't change your results, you should use TimeUnit. TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS.convert(2, TimeUnit.HOURS) –  John Vint Jun 16 '11 at 13:04
    
@Martijn Try-catch should pass the exception to main to be caught. –  Bitmap Jun 16 '11 at 13:15
    
@John i think the value passed to initial delay was the reason why it did execute quickly. My bad. –  Bitmap Jun 16 '11 at 13:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

According to the javadoc, your code should trigger the routine immediately (initial delay of zero), then after every 2 hours (period of 120 minutes).

scheduleAtFixedRate(TimerTask task, long delay, long period)

Schedules the specified task for repeated fixed-rate execution, beginning after the specified delay.

If you want the first triggering after 2 hours then do

long interval = 1000 * 60 * 120;
scheduleAtFixedRate(task, interval, interval)
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1  
+1, for explaining what was wrong with his code, rather than providing an entirely different implementation. –  mre Jun 16 '11 at 13:24

Whenever possible, use the Executors framework instead of a Timer.

Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor().scheduleAtFixedRate(new Runnable(){
    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        // do stuff
    }}, 0, 2, TimeUnit.HOURS);
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What is the advantage of this approach, please? And how do you stop the task at a later time? –  DNA Jun 16 '11 at 13:09
1  
@DNA, see section 6.2.5 Delayed and periodic tasks –  mre Jun 16 '11 at 13:18
    
@DNA One of the advantage that explain there is that Timer will have delayed in case of long tasks, but Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor().scheduleAtFixedRate will also suffer in delay in case of long task, so i didnt get the advantage. I am looking for fixRate ,but from the start of the task and not upon end of the task is there a solution for it ? –  Avihai Marchiano Aug 15 '14 at 9:35

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