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How do I get a sequence of a given number in Groovy, for example:

def number = 169
// need a method in groovy to find the consecutive numbers that is, 1,6,9,16,69,169
// not 19!

There is a method in Groovy called subsequences(), but that is not doing this job exactly. Can anyone say me how can I do this in Groovier way? Or is there any built-in method?

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Can you explain why 19 does not belong to the list? –  Andrey Adamovich Jun 16 '11 at 13:09
1  
I suspect it is because, in the original number 169, 1 and 9 are separated by the 6 and therefore not adjacent. –  Greg Jun 16 '11 at 13:17
    
What Greg says is correct :D –  Ant's Jun 16 '11 at 13:20
    
why a down vote? –  Ant's Jun 16 '11 at 13:21
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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Although late to the game, here's a solution that is less sophisticated than @tim's, but also will do the trick:

def str = 169 as String
def result = [] as SortedSet
(0..<str.length()).each { i ->
    (i..<str.length()).each { j ->
        result << str[i..j].toInteger()
    }
}

Edit:

The code works like two nested loops that iterate over the String representation of the number and extracting the various substrings from it.

The outer loop represents the start index of the substring and the inner loop the end index of the substring. The outer loop will go from the beginning to the end of the String, whereas the inner loop starts at the current start index and goes from there to the end.

The as SortedSet ensures that there are no duplicate numbers in the result and that the numbers are sorted in ascending order.

 1 6 9 
 -----
 0 1 2  <-- index
 =====
[1]6 9  (i=0; j=0)
[1 6]9  (i=0; j=1)
[1 6 9] (i=0; j=2)
 1[6]9  (i=1; j=1)
 1[6 9] (i=1; j=2)
 1 6[9] (i=2; j=2)
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can you explain me what your code does? –  Ant's Jun 17 '11 at 10:44
    
@ant: I hope it's clearer now –  Christoph Metzendorf Jun 17 '11 at 11:57
    
It works very simple :) but actually i dont want result as SortedSet. If you remove this one, then it is perfect! –  Ant's Jun 17 '11 at 12:24
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Run this in the Groovy console

def number = 169
number = number.toString() as List

def results = []

0.upto(number.size()) {numDigits ->

  for(int startPos = 0; startPos + numDigits < number.size(); startPos++) {
    def result = number[startPos..startPos + numDigits]
    results << result.join().toInteger()
  }
}

assert results == [1, 6, 9, 16, 69, 169]
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this is perfect! –  Ant's Jun 16 '11 at 13:22
    
+1 Better than mine... Works with 181 as well –  tim_yates Jun 16 '11 at 13:23
    
@tim_yates thanks, it gives me great pleasure to finally get one up on you :) –  Dónal Jun 16 '11 at 13:27
1  
@Don ;-) And the assert is probably comparing a List of Strings vs a List of Integers... Plus, I added to my answer to show a groovy-er version of your algorithm ;-) Couldn't resist...sorry –  tim_yates Jun 16 '11 at 13:29
1  
@mrK that's not how it works in groovy, the == is fine –  tim_yates Jun 16 '11 at 13:34
show 3 more comments

Taking Don's answer above (which works perfectly), I came up with a slightly Groovy-er version of the same thing:

def number = 181

number = number.toString() as List

def results = (0..<number.size()).inject([]) { res, numDigits ->
  res.addAll( (0..<number.size()-numDigits).collect { startPos ->
    number[startPos..startPos + numDigits].join() as int
  } )
  res
}

println results
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originalList contains? –  Ant's Jun 16 '11 at 13:24
    
There is problem with 1444 :D –  Ant's Jun 16 '11 at 13:26
    
@Ant yeah, there was a problem with repeat numbers in my original code... Changed to be a slightly Groovy-er version of Dons really good answer now –  tim_yates Jun 16 '11 at 13:37
1  
+1 for standing on the shoulders of giants :) –  Dónal Jun 16 '11 at 13:42
    
can you explain what it does! i'm an novice in Groovy :D –  Ant's Jun 16 '11 at 16:26
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There is no need to go from Integer to String to List and then back to String with join(), as String already behaves quite like any sequence:

// Sorry for the silly name. Couldn't think of anything better :)
def subInts(num) {
    def str = num as String
    (1..str.length()).inject([]) { res, size ->
        res += (0..str.length() - size).collect { i -> str[i..< i + size] as int }
    }
}

assert subInts(169) == [1, 6, 9, 16, 69, 169]

Aside from having a little less conversions, this is a copy of tim_yates solution. Hope it helps.

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STrictly algorithmically... You could do something like this:

num = 169
ar = []

while ( num >= 1 ) {
    str = num.toString()
    ar.add(str[str.indexOf('.')-1])
    num = num/10.toInteger()
}

len = ar.size()
for ( i in 1..len-1 ) {
    for (j in 0..len-i-1) {
        str = ""
        for ( k in 0..i) {
           str += ar.get(j+k)
        }
        ar.add(str)
    }
}

I think that should work.

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oneliner

(0..<n.size()).inject([]) {a,b -> (0..<n.size()-b).each {a << (n[it] as Integer)};a}
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