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I am trying to use JNI via VC++ and pass a custom directory in the classpath as a UTF-8 string -Djava.class.path=c:\myDir\my.jar

This works well and I could find the methods in the jar using FindClass

But when the directory name contains any extended ASCII characters then FindClass returns NoClassDefFound exception. I guess this is becasue the JVM is not able to load the jar file and I am doing something wrong in passing the arguments.

Here is what I do 1) Create a std::wstring jarPath(L"-Djava.class.path=C:\ÆËñœ\my.jar"); 2) Convert the wstring to CP_UTF8 using WideCharToMultiByte 3) copy the utf8String to optionString and call JNI_CreateJavaJVM

I have tried printing the convertyed utf8 to a log file just before calling the JNI_CReateJavaJVM and it prints perfectly.

Could somebody please tell if the CP_UTF8 (defined in windows SDK WinN;s.h) is not what the JNI expects? How do I debug this problem, any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance Rahul

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1 Answer 1

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The documentation suggests that the option string must be in "the default platform encoding". That probably means you'd need to use CP_ACP. If your characters can't be represented in that encoding then I'm not sure there's much you can do.

(Would the file's short name be usable instead?)

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I found the following bug against JVM… – Rahul Jun 17 '11 at 3:09
Hi Alan, CP_ACP worked well. But the probability that you said exists and there it migh fail, but anyway its much better than just supporting 127 ASCII characters only. – Rahul Jun 17 '11 at 4:18
I tried giving relative paths to the JVM e.g. the JAR's are inside my products installation directory which also contains its own JVM (in the current installation directory). So I thought I will give the relative path to JVM. But this didn't work. – Rahul Jun 17 '11 at 4:20
@Rahul: What about short names (GetShortPathName)? They're always basic ASCII characters I think. I'd have thought relative paths would work, as long as you set the current directory first. – Alan Stokes Jun 17 '11 at 9:06

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