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I’m new to Python and OOP (& StackOverflow), so excuse me if the question is too naïve, but I can’t seem to get it solved on my own. I’ve just written a very simple program to see how OOP works, which I reproduce below:

from System import *

class trial(object):
    def __init__(self, counter):
        self.counter = counter

    def passon(self):
        p = person(self.counter)
        p.increase()

class person(object):
    def __init__(self, counter):
       self.counter = counter


    def increase(self):
       self.counter +=1
       return self.counter

I call the function like this:

t = trial(2)
t.passon()

I was expecting the value of counter to updated automatically in class trial, however when I type t.counter, it still returns 2. But if I write:

p = person(t.counter)
p.increase()

then p.counter becomes 3. How do I increase the value of counter in class trial? I know I am making some elementary mistake here, but I’d appreciate any help.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Each of your classes has a separate counter attribute. If you want to update the trial object's counter with the result of calling p.increase(), you would need to do something similar to this in passon():

def passon(self):
    p = person(self.counter)
    self.counter = p.increase()
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Thanks!! This is really simple! –  dpsguy Jun 17 '11 at 7:11
    
Thanks everyone for your helpful and quick replies! I think I'll use this site more and more as I go along learning Python. –  dpsguy Jun 17 '11 at 7:13
    
@dpsguy, you're welcome! When you've received enough answers and tried them out, be sure to up-vote any that have helped you, in addition to accepting whichever one you feel is best -- it's just fundamental SO etiquette!-) –  martineau Jun 17 '11 at 10:11

Integers in Python are immutable. Pass the trial to the person, and increment the attribute on the saved trial instead.

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The immutability of integers has nothing to do with the problem. –  martineau Jun 16 '11 at 17:00
    
It is an oversimplification, but it is not entirely unrelated; this problem would not occur if it was a list and append() was being invoked. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 16 '11 at 17:01

I believe that each class has it's own counter. Modify your 'passon' function the following way and you will see this:

def passon(self):
    p = person(self.counter)
    print 't', self.counter
    print 'p', p.counter
    p.increase()
    print 'p', p.counter
    print 't', self.counter
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Your issue has to do with how Python treats objects -- some are immutable (you can't change them, you can only replace them) and some are mutable (you can change their internal state).

(If you know about references and pass by value vs. pass by reference etc. ints, floats, strings and tuples are like pass by value, (almost) everything else is mutable).

ints are "immutable" which means that when you perform some operation on it, it is actually returning a new copy (it can also be a cached value) of the int.

So this:

self.counter = self.counter + 1

is almost like this

self.counter = new int(counter + 1) # I know, "new" isn't pythonic, 
     #but it is clearer in OOP with the int function.

So, since self.counter is not the same thing which was originally passed to it, there is no way to have both p and t point to the same object.

The solution? Make Trial have a Person as a property:

from System import *

class trial(object):
    def __init__(self, counter):
        self.person = person(counter)

    def passon(self):
        p.increase()

class person(object):
    def __init__(self, counter):
       self.counter = counter

    def increase(self):
       self.counter +=1
       return self.counter

t = trial(2);
t.person # <!-- this is your person object.
t.passon()
print(t.person.counter) # 3
t.passon()
print(t.person.counter) # 4
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for clearing my misunderstanding. I thought everything is passed by reference in Python –  dpsguy Jun 17 '11 at 7:10

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