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I have not found a good resource for using interface{} types. For example

package main

import "fmt"

func weirdFunc(i int) interface{} {
    if i == 0 {
        return "zero"
    }
    return i
}
func main() {
    var i = 5
    var w = weirdFunc(5)

    // this example works!
    if tmp, ok := w.(int); ok {
        i += tmp
    }

    fmt.Println("i =", i)
}

Do you know of a good introduction to using Go's interface{}?

specific questions:

  • how do I get the "real" Type of w?
  • is there any way to get the string representation of a type?
  • is there any way to use the string representation of a type to convert a value?
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Your example does work. Here's a simplified version.

package main

import "fmt"

func weird(i int) interface{} {
    if i < 0 {
        return "negative"
    }
    return i
}

func main() {
    var i = 42
    if w, ok := weird(7).(int); ok {
        i += w
    }
    if w, ok := weird(-100).(int); ok {
        i += w
    }
    fmt.Println("i =", i)
}

Output:
i = 49

It uses Type assertions.

share|improve this answer
    
you're absolutely right! thanks! do you have any insight on types string representations of types? –  cc young Jun 16 '11 at 15:17
1  
Check out reflect.TypeOf. –  Dmitri Goldring Jan 19 at 11:21

You also can do type switches:

switch v := myInterface.(type) {
case int:
    // v is an int here, so e.g. v + 1 is possible.
    fmt.Printf("Integer: %v", v)
case float64:
    // v is a float64 here, so e.g. v + 1.0 is possible.
    fmt.Printf("Float64: %v", v)
case string:
    // v is a string here, so e.g. v + " Yeah!" is possible.
    fmt.Printf("String: %v", v)
default:
    // And here I'm feeling dumb. ;)
    fmt.Printf("I don't know, ask stackoverflow.")
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for that. but still not quite there. in the example, how to I coerce var w into an int? –  cc young Jun 16 '11 at 15:11
    
never mind. @peterSO got it. –  cc young Jun 16 '11 at 15:18
1  
Mue's example does the same thing, but in a type switch instead of an if statement. In the 'case int', 'v' will be an integer. in 'case float64', 'v' will be a float64, etc. –  jimt Jun 16 '11 at 16:48
    
right. had forgotten syntax var.(type), which is sneaky and cool –  cc young Jun 16 '11 at 18:56

You can use reflection (reflect.TypeOf()) to get the type of something, and the value it gives (Type) has a string representation (String method) that you can print.

share|improve this answer

Type switches can also be used with reflection stuff:

var str = "hello!"
var obj = reflect.ValueOf(&str)

switch obj.Elem().Interface().(type) {
case string:
    log.Println("obj contains a pointer to a string")
default:
    log.Println("obj contains something else")
}
share|improve this answer

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