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I am integrating someone's code, which has everything in one cpp file. The main code is like this:

class Outer
{
public:
   struct Inner
   {
      struct In_inner
      {
         ...
      }
   }
   int func(Inner& inn, Inner::In_inner& in_inn)
   {
      ...
   } 
}

To make separation, should I add the "Outer::" for the "Inner" parameter, as follows?

in the header file

class Outer
{
public:
   struct Inner
   {
      struct In_inner
      {
         ...
      }
   }
   int func(Inner& inn, Inner::In_inner& in_inn);
}

and in the cpp file:

int Outer::func(Outer::Inner& inn, Outer::Inner::In_inner& in_inn)
{
    ...
} 

It sounds a bit weird to me that the parameter list is a bit different from the declaration. Also, can I keep everything in the same file again, and include it as a header file?

Thanks for any comments!

share|improve this question
    
Have you done any testing yourself? – Kerrek SB Jun 16 '11 at 13:41
    
nope, I need some expertise ;-) – pepero Jun 16 '11 at 13:52
up vote 3 down vote accepted
int Outer::func(Outer::Inner& inn, Outer::Inner::In_inner& in_inn)

Yes. You've correctly written this. You've to add Outer:: if you define it outside the class.


It sounds a bit weird to me that the parameter list is a bit different from the declaration

That is okay. The function is defined outside the class. You're no more in the scope of the class. Hence it looks a bit different.

But if you don't want it to look different, then you can write Outer:: in the declaration as well, as shown below:

class Outer
{
public:
   //...
   int func(Outer::Inner& inn, Outer::Inner::In_inner& in_inn);
};

This is fine, and would work because Outer is an injected-name, its available inside the class as well.

struct A
{
    struct B { 
        struct C {};
    };

    B b1;    //okay - as usual
    A::B b2; //this is also okay - not so usual though

    B::C c1;    //okay - as usual
    A::B::C c2; //this is also okay - not so usual though

    A::A::A::A::A::A *pA; //this is very very unsual. But it is also okay!
};

The last line is okay, because the name A is injected inside the definition of class A. Hence it becomes recursively available.

See it compiles fine:

share|improve this answer
1  
thank you Nawaz for your illustrative answer. – pepero Jun 16 '11 at 13:54
    
@pepero: See the edit in my answer. – Nawaz Jun 16 '11 at 14:00
1  
so much fun! Thanks for showing this. – pepero Jun 16 '11 at 14:03
1  
+1 Nawaz always has illustrative answers :) – Kobe Jun 16 '11 at 14:41

The parameter list isn't different; the types are the same. It's not uncommon to have explicitly qualified std:: members in the header file and use using namespace std; in the source file, either. That's basically the same thing.

It doesn't matter how you qualify the types, as long as they refer to the same types. And because you are not in the scope of Outer in the source file, the explicit qualification is necessary there.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your comment! This relieves my doubt. – pepero Jun 16 '11 at 13:49

Within the class declaration/definition, you are in the scope Outer::. Outside that (in your .cpp), you are not. Yes, you can keep the function definition in the header: it is an implicit inline.

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