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I've been trying to implement a lengthof (T* v) function for quite a while, so far without any success.

There are the two basic, well-known solutions for T v[n] arrays, both of which are useless or even dangerous once the array has been decayed into a T* v pointer.

#define SIZE(v) (sizeof(v) / sizeof(v[0]))

template <class T, size_t n>
size_t lengthof (T (&) [n])
{
    return n;
}

There are workarounds involving wrapper classes and containers like STLSoft's array_proxy, boost::array, std::vector, etc. All of them have drawbacks, and lack the simplicity, syntactic sugar and widespread usage of arrays.

There are myths about solutions involving compiler-specific calls that are normally used by the compiler when delete [] needs to know the length of the array. According to the C++ FAQ Lite 16.14, there are two techniques used by compilers to know how much memory to deallocate: over-allocation and associative arrays. At over-allocation it allocates one wordsize more, and puts the length of the array before the first object. The other method obviously stores the lengths in an associative array. Is it possible to know which method G++ uses, and to extract the appropriate array length? What about overheads and paddings? Any hope for non-compiler-specific code? Or even non-platform-specific G++ builtins?

There are also solutions involving overloading operator new [] and operator delete [], which I implemented:

std::map<void*, size_t> arrayLengthMap;

inline void* operator new [] (size_t n)
throw (std::bad_alloc)
{
    void* ptr = GC_malloc(n);
    arrayLengthMap[ptr] = n;
    return ptr;
}

inline void operator delete [] (void* ptr)
throw ()
{
    arrayLengthMap.erase(ptr);
    GC_free(ptr);
}

template <class T>
inline size_t lengthof (T* ptr)
{
    std::map<void*, size_t>::const_iterator it = arrayLengthMap.find(ptr);
    if( it == arrayLengthMap.end() ){
        throw std::bad_alloc();
    }
    return it->second / sizeof(T);
}

It was working nicely until I got a strange error: lengthof couldn't find an array. As it turned out, G++ allocated 8 more bytes at the start of this specific array than it should have. Though operator new [] should have returned the start of the entire array, call it ptr, the calling code got ptr+8 instead, so lengthof(ptr+8) obviously failed with the exception (even if it did not, it could have potentially returned a wrong array size). Are those 8 bytes some kind of overhead or padding? Can not be the previously mentioned over-allocation, the function worked correctly for many arrays. What is it and how to disable or work around it, assuming it is possible to use G++ specific calls or trickery?

Edit: Due to the numerous ways it is possible to allocate C-style arrays, it is not generally possible to tell the length of an arbitrary array by its pointer, just as Oli Charlesworth suggested. But it is possible for non-decayed static arrays (see the template function above), and arrays allocated with a custom operator new [] (size_t, size_t), based on an idea by Ben Voigt:

#include <gc/gc.h>
#include <gc/gc_cpp.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <map>

typedef std::map<void*, std::pair<size_t, size_t> > ArrayLengthMap;
ArrayLengthMap arrayLengthMap;

inline void* operator new [] (size_t size, size_t count)
throw (std::bad_alloc)
{
    void* ptr = GC_malloc(size);
    arrayLengthMap[ptr] = std::pair<size_t, size_t>(size, count);
    return ptr;
}

inline void operator delete [] (void* ptr)
throw ()
{
    ArrayLengthMap::const_iterator it = arrayLengthMap.upper_bound(ptr);
    it--;
    if( it->first <= ptr and ptr < it->first + it->second.first ){
        arrayLengthMap.erase(it->first);
    }
    GC_free(ptr);
}

inline size_t lengthof (void* ptr)
{
    ArrayLengthMap::const_iterator it = arrayLengthMap.upper_bound(ptr);
    it--;
    if( it->first <= ptr and ptr < it->first + it->second.first ){
        return it->second.second;
    }
    throw std::bad_alloc();
}

int main (int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int* v = new (112) int[112];
    std::cout << lengthof(v) << std::endl;
}

Unfortunately due to arbitrary overheads and paddings by the compiler, there is no reliable way so far to determine the length of a dynamic array in a custom operator new [] (size_t), unless we assume that the padding is smaller than the size of one of the elements of the array.

However there are other kinds of arrays as well for which length calculation might be possible, as Ben Voigt suggested, thus it should be possible and desirable to construct a wrapper class that can accept several kinds of arrays (and their lengths) in its constructors, and is implicitly or explicitly convertible to other wrapper classes and array types. Different lifetimes of different kinds of arrays might be a problem, but it could be solved with garbage collection.

share|improve this question
2  
You think this is simpler than converting your code to be based around std::vector or boost::array? Over-allocation could be done for a lot of reasons. You could prototype using a different allocator such as boost::pool_allocator –  totowtwo Jun 16 '11 at 14:25
    
Is it even possible to get the length of a C-style array in C itself without the usage of a sentinel value? The fact that strings in C are null-terminated leads me to believe it's generally not possible. –  JAB Jun 16 '11 at 14:29
1  
Note that your tricks will only "work" for dynamically allocated arrays. Static and automatic arrays usually don't have any meta-information stored anywhere. –  FredOverflow Jun 16 '11 at 14:32
1  
@JAB: in C it's not possible, the array immediately decays to a pointer. –  Matthieu M. Jun 16 '11 at 14:56
    
@JAB, @Matthieu: I'm pretty sure that the sizeof method works in C. Arrays don't decay in sizeof context. –  Ben Voigt Jun 16 '11 at 15:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

To answer this:

Any hope for non-compiler-specific code?

No.

More generally, if you find yourself needing to do this, then you probably need to reconsider your design. Use a std::vector, for instance.

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@Oli: Although I agree with the suggestion on std::vector, I have to downvote your assertion that this isn't possible. The idea presented in the question is already 95% there. –  Ben Voigt Jun 16 '11 at 14:31
1  
@Ben: There is no platform-independent way of getting the length of an arbitrary C-style array. For a start, new [] is not the only way to obtain such a thing. Plus, the OP's approach won't work for "real" arrays that have decayed into a T *. Nor multidimensional arrays. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 16 '11 at 14:35
    
@Oli: This question doesn't seem to be about arbitrary arrays, only operator new[]. Sounds like he needs something that can pass through APIs which need pure pointers, and still be able to recover the length in a callback on the other side. –  Ben Voigt Jun 16 '11 at 14:44
    
@Ben: Possibly. But he/she doesn't say that in their question, so I'm reserving judgement. I believe my answer is correct in the general case. –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 16 '11 at 14:49
    
@Oli: The main issue is with dynamic arrays, I should have clarified that. Though it is now crystal clear it is not possible for arbitrary arrays, it would be still good to implement it for dynamic arrays. I believe custom overallocation or associative arrays could be used to produce cross-platform code, assuming some constraints on padding. All said, wrapper classes are still the most attractive solutions, they could be constructed from static arrays, dynamic arrays (with or without length). –  Frigo Jun 16 '11 at 15:05

Your analysis is mostly correct, however I think you've ignored the fact that types with trivial destructors don't need to store the length, and so overallocation can be different for different types.

The standard allows operator new[] to steal a few bytes for its own use, so you'll have to do a range check on the pointer instead of an exact match. std::map probably won't be efficient for this, but a sorted vector should be (can be binary searched). A balanced tree should also work really well.

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actually a range check would be efficient on a std::map because the intervals are disjoints. So you just need to sort by the lower or upper bound and store the other in the value to make sure you are in the range. Remember than a sorted vector implies moving (potentially lots) of pointers about, the best data structure would probably be one B Tree. –  Matthieu M. Jun 16 '11 at 14:59
    
The lower_bound function of std::map seems to do the job in logarithmic size. Since we store sizes, we can easily compute the intervals. There is still the issue of arbitrary overheads and paddings put in by the compiler, I'm not sure whether there is anything in the standard about it. –  Frigo Jun 16 '11 at 15:24
1  
@Matthieu: Right, I keep thinking of std::map as if it's a hash table, but it isn't. Anyway, we're agreed that a balanced tree is most efficient. –  Ben Voigt Jun 16 '11 at 15:37
2  
@Frigo: The standard expressly permits overallocation for new[], without restriction. "A new-expression passes the amount of space requested to the allocation function as the first argument of type std::size_t. That argument shall be no less than the size of the object being created; it may be greater than the size of the object being created only if the object is an array." -- section [expr.new] –  Ben Voigt Jun 16 '11 at 15:39

Some time ago, I used a similar thing to monitor memory leaks:

When asked to allocate size bytes of data, I would alloc size + 4 bytes and store the length of the allocation in the first 4 bytes:

static unsigned int total_still_alloced = 0;
void *sys_malloc(UINT size)
{
#if ENABLED( MEMLEAK_CHECK )
  void *result = malloc(size+sizeof(UINT )); 
  if(result)
  {
    memset(result,0,size+sizeof(UINT ));
    *(UINT *)result = size;
    total_still_alloced += size;
    return (void*)((UINT*)result+sizeof(UINT));
  }
  else
  {
    return result;
  }
#else
  void *result = malloc(size);
  if(result) memset(result,0,size);
  return result;
#endif
}

void sys_free(void *p)
{
  if(p != NULL)
  {
#if ENABLED( MEMLEAK_CHECK )
    UINT * real_address = (UINT *)(p)-sizeof(UINT);
    total_still_alloced-= *((UINT *)real_address);

    free((void*)real_address);
#else
    free(p);
#endif
  }
}

In your case, retrieving the allocated size is a matter of shifting the provided address by 4 and read the value.

Note that if you have memory corruption somewhere... you'll get invalid results. Note also that it is often how malloc works internally: putting the size of the allocation on a hidden field before the adress returned. On some architectures, I don't even have to allocate more, using the system malloc is sufficient.

That's an invasive way of doing it... but it works (provided you allocate everything with these modified allocation routines, AND that you know the starting address of your array).

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