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I have 2 methods as following:

Method1(int a, int b)
{
    var type = Typ1(a, b);
}

Method2
{
    var type = Typ2(a, b);
}

I'd like to write a generic method which does the work:

GenericMethod<T>(int a, int b)
{
    var type = new T(a, b);
}

But T doesn't accept any input parameter. How could I achieve this?

I know using Activator.Instance(T, a, b) I can do that but it has a high performance cost.

I also know that I can call the default constructor of a generic type using T() then setting the properties,but in my case, I'd like to pass 2 parameters which are compulsory.

I don't want to introduce a constructor with no parameter.

Is there any way to do this with generics?

Thanks,

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1  
It should be noted that even if you do new T() on a generic type which was a new() constraint, the compiler will simply transform that to an Activator.CreateInstance<T>() call, so there is no performance benefit. The only way around that is to use some kind of factory pattern, similar to what SLaks is doing with the delegate. –  Sven Jun 16 '11 at 15:08

5 Answers 5

Create your factory class:

    public static class TypeFactory<T>
{
    private static Func<int, int, T> Func { get; set; }

    static TypeFactory()
    {
        TypeFactory<Type1>.Func = (a, b) => new Type1(a, b);
        TypeFactory<Type2>.Func = (a, b) => new Type2(a, b);
    }

    public static T Create(int a, int b)
    {
        return Func(a, b);
    }
}

Then use it like this:

        var type1 = TypeFactory<Type1>.Create(1, 2);
        var type2 = TypeFactory<Type2>.Create(1, 2);
share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't initialize it in the class itself. Your initializer will run once per type parameter. –  SLaks Jun 17 '11 at 1:38
    
what would you suggest then? I can use a lock inside the class to make sure the static constructor only runs once but I doubt it will gain any performance benefit over Activator.CreateInstance<T>()? –  The Light Jun 17 '11 at 7:57
1  
Move the code in the static ctor to a non-generic type. –  SLaks Jun 17 '11 at 12:10
    
have you got a code sample for this? I can't just move the static ctor out of the class. I mean I can move it but when should it be called and from where? I'd need it to be called only once throughout the application. I can put it in the Application_Start event! –  The Light Jun 17 '11 at 19:24

No.

Instead, you can accept a delegate that creates them for you:

GenericMethod<T>(int a, int b, Func<int, int, T> creator) {
    T t = creator(a, b);
}

GenericMethod(8, 9, (a, b) => new YourType(a, b));

You could also store these creators in a generic static class:

static class Creator<T> {
    public static Func<int, int, T> Func { get; set; }
}
GenericMethod<T>(int a, int b) {
    T t = Creator<T>.Func(a, b);
}


Creator<YourType>.Func = (a, b) => new YourType(a, b);
share|improve this answer
    
Aka the factory pattern. ;) –  Sven Jun 16 '11 at 15:16
    
I quite like the static generic class approach, thanks. Does it have the highest performance in comparison with other approaches? –  The Light Jun 16 '11 at 22:30

If you don't want to use Activator, you could use an expression tree. Create an Instance of a Class with Expression Trees

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1  
To make that worth doing, you need to store the compiled expression tree (eg, in a static generic dictionary, as in my answer) so that you can reuse it later. Otherwise, it will end up being even slower. –  SLaks Jun 16 '11 at 15:27
    
bloggingabout.net/blogs/vagif/archive/2010/04/02/… Is this approach the fastest one? –  The Light Jun 17 '11 at 6:39
1  
This seems to be the best way; thanks. –  The Light Jun 18 '11 at 12:14

In theory, you need to use a generic type constraint. However, the only constructor constraint available is support for a parameterless constructor where T : new().

If Typ1 and Typ2 share a base class which defines properties using the 2 integers or both support an interface guaranteeing setters for those integers you could define a parameterless constructor on each class and use an additional constraint to allow later access to the properties.

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A constraint of T to the base type would not open up the constructors on T. For one, there is no guarantee that for a base with a parameterized constructor that the derived children also provide parameterized constructors. –  Anthony Pegram Jun 16 '11 at 15:11
    
Even with a new() constraint, the compiler just translates that into a call to Activator.CreateInstance<T>(), so there's no performance gain. The only thing you gain is compile time checking for the presence of a constructor. –  Sven Jun 16 '11 at 15:17
    
@Sven, where do you get that? I see no such evidence in the IL or the C# language specification on the constraint. –  Anthony Pegram Jun 16 '11 at 15:23
    
I'm not sure if it's required behaviour by the specification, but it is what both the Microsoft and Mono C# compilers do; you can check it with Reflector of ILSpy or something similar. –  Sven Jun 16 '11 at 15:26
    
@Anthony: I belive Sven is correct; I tried it a while ago. –  SLaks Jun 16 '11 at 15:26
public static class MyTypeFactory
{
    static MyTypeFactory()
    {
        MethodRunner<Type1>.Func = (a, b) => new Type1(a, b);
        MethodRunner<Type2>.Func = (a, b) => new Type2(a, b);
    }

    public static T Create<T>(int a, int b)
    {
        return MethodRunner<T>.Func(a, b);
    }

    static class MethodRunner<T>
    {
        public static Func<int, int, T> Func { get; set; }
    }
}

This looks promising?!

is a static ctor thread-safe by nature (CLR) like static field initializers?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. Static field initializers are compiled into the static ctor. –  SLaks Jul 1 '11 at 13:33

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