Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does R have a function for weighted least squares? Specifically, I am looking for something that computes intercept and slope.

Data sets

  1. 1 3 5 7 9 11 14 17 19 25 29
  2. 17 31 19 27 31 62 58 35 29 21 18
  3. 102153 104123 96564 125565 132255 115454 114555 132255 129564 126455 124578

The dependent variable is dataset 3 and dataset 1 and 2 are the independent variables.

share|improve this question
4  
From your comments it doesn't sound like you really want weighted least squares but instead multiple regression. Care to revise your question appropriately? –  Aaron Jun 16 '11 at 18:30
    
It's still not clear to me (having read the answers and comments below) how weights come into the picture. –  Ben Bolker Jun 16 '11 at 22:00
    
More about least squares here and here. –  hhh Nov 13 '11 at 23:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes, of course, there is a weights= option to lm(), the basic linear model fitting function. Quick example:

R> df <- data.frame(x=1:10)
R> lm(x ~ 1, data=df)            ## i.e. the same as mean(df$x)

Call:
lm(formula = x ~ 1, data = df)

Coefficients:
(Intercept)  
        5.5  

R> lm(x ~ 1, data=df, weights=seq(0.1, 1.0, by=0.1))

Call:
lm(formula = x ~ 1, data = df, weights = seq(0.1, 1, by = 0.1))

Coefficients:
(Intercept)  
          7  

R> 

so by weighing later observations more heavily the mean of the sequence 1 to 10 moves from 5.5 to 7.

share|improve this answer
    
not sure if i follow. if i have 3 data sets how would i estimate intercept and slops. data set 1) :1 3 5 7 9 11 14 17 19 25 29 data set 2:17 31 19 27 31 62 58 35 29 21 18 dataset 3:102153 104123 96564 125565 132255 115454 114555 132255 129564 126455 124578 the dependent variable is dataset 3 and dataset 1 and 2 are the independent variables –  RyanB Jun 16 '11 at 17:09
3  
Now we don't follow. What are the weights you want to use? –  Aaron Jun 16 '11 at 17:18
3  
Then it doesn't sound like you want weighted least squares after all. –  Aaron Jun 16 '11 at 18:29
1  
@Dirk: can you elaborate what the "x ~ 1" actually mean? Chase's reply infers that things such as "y ~ x1 + x2" are like "dependent vars VS independent vars" or am I over-interpreting? –  hhh Nov 13 '11 at 18:52
1  
@hhh: x~1 is an intercept-only regression model. These formulae are the basis of regression modeling in R: if you need to do regression you should start by reading the relevant section in the Introduction to R (and possibly Faraway's linear modeling book draft in the contributed documents section on the R web site) -- also see the link in Chase's answer –  Ben Bolker Nov 13 '11 at 19:02

First, create your datasets. I'm putting them into a single data.frame but this is not strictly necessary.

dat <- data.frame(x1 = c(1,3,5,7,9,11,14,17,19,25, 29)
                  , x2 = c(17, 31, 19, 27, 31, 62, 58, 35, 29, 21, 18)
                  , y  = c(102153, 104123, 96564, 125565, 132255, 115454
                           , 114555, 132255, 129564, 126455, 124578)
                  )

Second, estimate the model:

> lm(y ~ x1 + x2, data = dat)

Call:
lm(formula = y ~ x1 + x2, data = dat)

Coefficients:
(Intercept)           x1           x2  
  104246.37       906.91        85.76

Third, add your weights as necessary following @Dirk's suggestions.

Fourth and most importantly - read through a tutorial or two on regression in R. Google turns this up as a top hit: http://www.jeremymiles.co.uk/regressionbook/extras/appendix2/R/

share|improve this answer
    
Yep this is what I was looknig for. thanks. –  RyanB Jun 16 '11 at 17:49
2  
@RyanB - I would add your data to your questions so that it is all in one place. Also, if this answer your question, clicking the check mark to "accept" it will let others in the future know that this was helpful to you. –  Chase Jun 16 '11 at 19:01
2  
@RyanB Then please do note the terminology used by @Chase and @Aaron - what you are doing is not a weight least squares (WLS) unless you supply some weights. What @Chase shows is just ordinary least squares. @Dirk's Answer shows you how to start using WLS with the lm() function. –  Gavin Simpson Jun 16 '11 at 19:14
1  
Yes Gavin, the combination of the two responses answers my question. –  RyanB Jun 16 '11 at 20:38
    
what about if you have a model with random constants before the variables x1 and x2 like "y ~ \beta_{1} x1 + \beta_{2} x2+error" where you assume that the error does not correlate with x1 and x2? –  hhh Nov 13 '11 at 23:24

Just another take on this. You can create a weight matrix first. For example:

samplevar = var(ydata)

M = diag(40,1/samplevar)

At this point M is a 40x40 diagonal matrix. You can convert to a vector by applying diag to M:

M_vector = diag(M)

Then use this in lm :

   lm ( YXDATAFRAME, weights=M_vector)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.