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What is the difference between library files and modules in Perl?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It's all Perl code to perl. All distinctions are purely idiomatic.

Perl code meant for inclusion that uses a package directive:

  • Called "module".
  • Usually have the extension .pm. Must have this extension for use to find them.
  • Should always be loaded with require, possibly via use.
  • More modular, better supported by CPAN.

Perl code meant for inclusion that doesn't use a package directive:

  • Called "library".
  • Usually have the extension .pl.
  • Should always be loaded with do.
  • Pollute the caller's namespace.
  • Usually indicate a substandard design.

Perl code meant for direct execution by interpreter:

  • Called "script".
  • Usually have the extension .pl, or none at all.
  • Will probably start with a #! line so they can be started without specifying perl.
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Library files (I'm assuming you mean require 'foo.pl' stuff here) are an obsolete (pre-Perl 5) form of external module. For the most part, you shouldn't need to care any more, although there are still some Perl 4 installations around and therefore still some Perl code that remains backward compatible with them (and there's some code that's simply never been updated and still loads getcwd.pl etc.).

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Nothing. They are both files that contain Perl code. Here are some of the possible circumstantial differences, though.

  1. A perl executable is more likely to have a #!/bin/perl shbang.
  2. Old .pl Perl libraries (hence the 'p' + 'l') are more likely to expect to be required than .pm modules.
  3. Perl 5 style (.pm) modules are more likely to use Exporter -- although even newer module eschew exporting anything.
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3  
A module always defines a package (or else it's not a module). a .pl library usually doesn't. –  hobbs Jun 16 '11 at 19:24
    
I don't know what you mean by #2. .pm (i.e. files a package directive) should always be loaded with require, possibly via use. .pl (i.e. files without a package directive) should always be loaded with do. –  ikegami Jun 16 '11 at 21:44
    
@ikegami, 1) If someone gave you a .pm file, would you expect to need to require (or even do) it? Or is it more of a question if you had a .pl file. 2) Package directive doesn't enter into it when talking about the file types, but out of the two--I'd more likely expect that a .pm file defines a package than a .pl file. So it's also in the vein of a difference of practice in creating the two types of files. Again, suggested practice is different from de facto--or characteristic--practice--in my experience with .pl files--I have never seen somebody do them--advisability not withstanding. –  Axeman Jun 24 '11 at 16:38
    
If someone gave me a .pm file, I would expect it to have a package directive, and thus, I would expect to be able to load it using require. I too would also more likely expect that a .pm file defines a package than a .pl file, which is why I said .pm should always be loaded with require, and why I said .pl should never be loaded using require. –  ikegami Jun 24 '11 at 21:41

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