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I am generating a script for automatically migrating changes from multiple development databases to staging/production. Basically, it takes a bunch of change-scripts, and merges them into a single script, wrapping each script in a IF whatever BEGIN ... END statement.

However, some of the scripts require a GO statement so that, for instance, the SQL parser knows about a new column after it's created.

ALTER TABLE dbo.EMPLOYEE 
ADD COLUMN EMP_IS_ADMIN BIT NOT NULL
GO -- Necessary, or next line will generate "Unknown column:  EMP_IS_ADMIN"
UPDATE dbo.EMPLOYEE SET EMP_IS_ADMIN = whatever

However, once I wrap that in an IF block:

IF whatever
BEGIN
    ALTER TABLE dbo.EMPLOYEE ADD COLUMN EMP_IS_ADMIN BIT NOT NULL
    GO
    UPDATE dbo.EMPLOYEE SET EMP_IS_ADMIN = whatever
END

It fails because I am sending a BEGIN with no matching END. However, if I remove the GO it complains again about an unknown column.

Is there any way to create and update the same column within a single IF block?

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1  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/4855537/… please –  gbn Jun 16 '11 at 19:01
    
@gbn: Yes, I realize why this happens (see second paragraph); but I have no idea how to work around it - do I really need to turn every query into a bunch of strings!? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jun 16 '11 at 20:25
    
@BlueRaja: What's the concern? If it works, that's all that matters at the end of the day. If there's a legitimate business problem with the solution provided, please express that. Is there something specifically disconcerting about converting every query into a bunch of strings? –  mellamokb Jun 16 '11 at 20:32
    
@mellamokb: Yes, there's a problem; if the word GO is used in any other context (such as a comment, or a string), the script won't work. Also, we lose the useful line-numbers in error messages in case anything goes wrong. Is there no way to do this with transactions? Or try/catch? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jun 16 '11 at 20:57
    
@BlueRaja: 1) I believe GO has to be on a line by itself, so you can search for that case only, and not every instance of the word GO. 2) You can always log which statements were completed successfully. Or you could wrap the whole thing in a try/catch and use your own line numbers using some variable, like @lineNo, that you keep track of, and report out on error. Since you are generating these automatically, making changes like this should be a breeze. It just sounds like you plain don't want to explore this route when I think there are solutions to be found for all of your concerns. –  mellamokb Jun 17 '11 at 1:00
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5 Answers

GO is not SQL - it is simply a batch separator used in some MS SQL tools.

If you don't use that, you need to ensure the statements are executed separately - either in different batches or by using dynamic SQL for the population (thanks @gbn):

IF whatever
BEGIN
    ALTER TABLE dbo.EMPLOYEE ADD COLUMN EMP_IS_ADMIN BIT NOT NULL;

    EXEC ('UPDATE dbo.EMPLOYEE SET EMP_IS_ADMIN = whatever')
END
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1  
Yes, I understand that. This does not answer the question - I need to create and update a column in the same IF block. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jun 16 '11 at 18:43
    
@Oded: Would the ; help out here? - You've just edited your answer :o) –  Neil Knight Jun 16 '11 at 18:45
    
@Neil - this is my thinking, yes. –  Oded Jun 16 '11 at 18:46
    
; doesn't work either - the parser is still giving me "Invalid column name 'EMP_IS_ADMIN'." –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jun 16 '11 at 18:51
    
When the batch is compiled, EMP_IS_ADMIN does not exist. stackoverflow.com/questions/4855537/… –  gbn Jun 16 '11 at 19:01
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You could try sp_executesql, splitting the contents between each GO statement into a separate string to be executed, as demonstrated in the example below. Also, there is a @statementNo variable to track which statement is being executed for easy debugging where an exception occurred. The line numbers will be relative to the beginning of the relevant statement number that caused the error.

BEGIN TRAN

DECLARE @statementNo INT
BEGIN TRY
    IF 1=1
    BEGIN
        SET @statementNo = 1
        EXEC sp_executesql
            N'  ALTER TABLE dbo.EMPLOYEE
                    ADD COLUMN EMP_IS_ADMIN BIT NOT NULL'

        SET @statementNo = 2
        EXEC sp_executesql
            N'  UPDATE dbo.EMPLOYEE
                    SET EMP_IS_ADMIN = 1'

        SET @statementNo = 3
        EXEC sp_executesql
            N'  UPDATE dbo.EMPLOYEE
                    SET EMP_IS_ADMIN = 1x'
    END
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    PRINT 'Error occurred on line ' + cast(ERROR_LINE() as varchar(10)) 
       + ' of ' + 'statement # ' + cast(@statementNo as varchar(10)) 
       + ': ' + ERROR_MESSAGE()
    -- error occurred, so rollback the transaction
    ROLLBACK
END CATCH
-- if we were successful, we should still have a transaction, so commit it
IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0
    COMMIT

You can also easily execute multi-line statements, as demonstrated in the example above, by simply wrapping them in single quotes ('). Don't forget to escape any single quotes contained inside the string with a double single-quote ('') when generating the scripts.

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Don't think this would work for commands split across multiple lines, would it? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jun 16 '11 at 18:54
    
@BlueRaja: I have updated the example to show how it would work. Those strings can be multi-line, as long as any single quotes (') contained inside are escaped by using a double-single quote ('') –  mellamokb Jun 16 '11 at 19:03
1  
@BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft: yes it would. This isn't VBA... –  gbn Jun 16 '11 at 19:04
1  
@mellamokb: strictly speaking, only the UPDATE needs sp_executesql ... stackoverflow.com/questions/4855537/… –  gbn Jun 16 '11 at 19:06
1  
@gbn: True. But if you're going to automate this for 100's of statements, it will be easier to just apply it blindly across all statements instead of deciding when and where you need it. –  mellamokb Jun 16 '11 at 19:16
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I ultimately got it to work by replacing every instance of GO on its own line with

END
GO

---Automatic replacement of GO keyword, need to recheck IF conditional:
IF whatever
BEGIN

This is greatly preferable to wrapping every group of statements in a string, but is still far from ideal. If anyone finds a better solution, post it and I'll accept it instead.

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1  
If the first conditional is "if this column doesn't exist", the first statement in the block is "add this column", then the second check of the conditional will find the column and not execute the second statement, –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 14 '11 at 4:09
    
@Damien: True; fortunately, that will never happen in my case (the conditional is always a check for a specific value in a specific table, which is always added as the last statement of the IF block). It seems as though there is just no good way to do this in SQL. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 14 '11 at 4:33
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You can incorporate a GOTO and LABEL statements to skip over code, thus leaving the GO keywords intact.

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It seems that LABELs cannot be referenced across GO statements since they are not in the batch sent to SQL –  berkeleybross Jun 26 at 14:16
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You can enclose the statements in BEGIN and END instead of the GO inbetween

IF COL_LENGTH('Employees','EMP_IS_ADMIN') IS NULL --Column does not exist
BEGIN
    BEGIN
        ALTER TABLE dbo.Employees ADD EMP_IS_ADMIN BIT
    END

    BEGIN
        UPDATE EMPLOYEES SET EMP_IS_ADMIN = 0
    END
END

(Tested on Northwind database)

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Please give reason for -1 –  Andy Joiner Apr 16 at 10:10
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