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Execute the following script that creates and populates a table into your dev database.

SET NOCOUNT ON
Drop Table dbo.Region
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.Region(
    RegionId      int             IDENTITY(1,1),
    RegionName    varchar(100)    NOT NULL
)
GO

INSERT INTO dbo.Region (RegionName) 
VALUES  ('Region One'), 
        ('Region Two');
GO

SELECT * FROM dbo.Region

The output of this what you would expect from a well-behaving Identity field.

RegionId    RegionName
----------- ------------------
1           Region One
2           Region Two

Now let's force a couple of values into the Identity column.

SET NOCOUNT ON
Drop Table dbo.Region
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.Region(
    RegionId      int             IDENTITY(1,1),
    RegionName    varchar(100)    NOT NULL
)
GO

SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Region ON;
INSERT INTO dbo.Region (RegionId, RegionName) 
VALUES (-9, 'Unknown'),
       (-99, 'N/A');
SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Region OFF;

INSERT INTO dbo.Region (RegionName) 
VALUES  ('Region One'), 
        ('Region Two');
GO

SELECT * FROM dbo.Region

The output is

RegionId    RegionName
----------- ------------------
-9          Unknown
-99         N/A
2           Region One
3           Region Two

Where did RegionId=1 go?




Edit On further research, Sql-Server does not skip anything if you try the same stunt twice

SET NOCOUNT ON
Drop Table dbo.Region
GO
CREATE TABLE dbo.Region(
    RegionId      int             IDENTITY(1,1),
    RegionName    varchar(100)    NOT NULL
)
GO

SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Region ON;
INSERT INTO dbo.Region (RegionId, RegionName) 
VALUES (-9, 'Unknown'), 
       (-99, 'N/A');
SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Region OFF;

INSERT INTO dbo.Region (RegionName) 
VALUES  ('Region One'), 
        ('Region Two');
GO
SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Region ON;
INSERT INTO dbo.Region (RegionId, RegionName) 
VALUES (-999, 'Known-Unknown'), 
       (-9999, 'Really N/A');
SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Region OFF;

INSERT INTO dbo.Region (RegionName) 
VALUES  ('Region Four'), 
        ('Region Five');
GO

SELECT * FROM dbo.Region

The output here is

RegionId    RegionName
----------- ------------------
-9          Unknown
-99         N/A
2           Region One
3           Region Two
-999        Known-Unknown
-9999       Really N/A
4           Region Four
5           Region Five

In the previous case, the 1 went missing. Here the 4 did not go missing!

So now this is the unpredictable, missing identity!

Why did the RegionId = 1 go missing, but the RegionId = 4 not go missing?!

share|improve this question
1  
Is this for pure research or do you really need the 1? I ask because the general consensus is that if you use IDENTITY/AUTONUMBER you are saying "I don't actually care what the actual value is, as long as it is unique". That is, you do care what the value is, but not enough to make sure it is a specific value, you just let the database decide. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jun 16 '11 at 19:59
    
I'm pretty sure I understand what a surrogate key is and how one uses an Identity field. I do not need the 1. However, as you no doubt see from my two examples, this one went AWOL. I do want to know where it went and why. –  Raj More Jun 16 '11 at 20:02
    
And I agree, that is a very good and interesting question! –  Lasse V. Karlsen Jun 16 '11 at 20:04
    
the same answers still apply for region four = 4: for no records in the file the seed is used for ANY records in the file the seed + 1 is the starting point for new identities ( probably stored in current identity ) –  Jimbo Jun 16 '11 at 20:56

3 Answers 3

IDENTITY(1,1) applies to the FIRST row in the table

Since you already have two rows inserted the seed no longer applies

The next identity algorithm is adding one to the seed start when it detects that there are existing records in the table since 1 may have already been used.

share|improve this answer
    
But Jimbo, I did not touch the seed - I inserted my own identity! –  Raj More Jun 16 '11 at 20:05
2  
the seed of 1 only applies to the FIRST record, by adding your own records before the seed can be used you indirectly affected it - the next identity algorithm knows there are existing records so it may be pointless to start with the first seed - so, rightly or wrongly it starts looking at seed + 1 for the next available identity. –  Jimbo Jun 16 '11 at 20:13
1  
@Raj More: You can even remove your first rows before inserting others, and you would still end up with the very next row's identity column's value being 2. I mean, you inserted rows that never used identity 1, then removed them, and that would still prevent you from ever obtaining identity 1 automatically. –  Andriy M Jun 18 '11 at 14:21

I've noticed this as well, the first identity value is somehow special. If you do a transaction on the table, the first identity is removed. This is not true for following identities.

The reason appears to be that the current identity starts out with a NULL value:

create table YourTable (id int identity)
dbcc checkident(YourTable)
-->
Checking identity information: current identity value 'NULL', 
current column value 'NULL'.

When the current identity is NULL, the next number to be given out is 1. But any transaction, even one that doesn't consume a new identity, causes the current identity to change from NULL to 1:

set identity_insert YourTable on;
insert YourTable (id) values (-1)
set identity_insert YourTable off;
dbcc checkident(YourTable)
-->
Checking identity information: current identity value '1', 
current column value '1'.

With the current identity of 1, the next number will be 2:

insert YourTable default values
select * from YourTable
-->
2

So, the first transaction on a fresh table has a special effect on the current identity. It doesn't have to be a new table, it happens after truncate table too.

share|improve this answer

From SQL Server Books Online

IDENTITY [ (seed , increment ) ]

seed

Is the value that is used for the very first row loaded into the table.

increment

Is the incremental value that is added to the identity value of the previous row that was loaded.

Because you used IDENTITY_INSERT to load the first row into the table the seed in that instance was not required. For IDENTITY_INSERT it is also documented that

If the value inserted is larger than the current identity value for the table, SQL Server automatically uses the new inserted value as the current identity value.

It leaves it unspecified what should happen in the case described in your question but it is clear that it just sets the current identity value to MAX(seed,identity_inserted) from the below

CREATE TABLE dbo.Region(
    RegionId      int             IDENTITY(1,1),
    RegionName    varchar(100)    NOT NULL
)

SELECT increment_value,
       last_value as last_value_new_table
FROM sys.identity_columns 
WHERE name ='RegionId' AND object_id=object_id('dbo.Region')

SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Region ON;
INSERT INTO dbo.Region (RegionId, RegionName) 
VALUES (-9, '-9')
SET IDENTITY_INSERT dbo.Region OFF;

SELECT increment_value,
       last_value as last_value_after_insert
FROM sys.identity_columns 
WHERE name ='RegionId' AND object_id=object_id('dbo.Region')

DROP TABLE dbo.Region

Returns

increment_value                last_value_new_table
------------------------------ ------------------------------
1                              NULL

increment_value                last_value_after_insert
------------------------------ ------------------------------
1                              1
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