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How do I make cross-browser (including Internet Explorer 6) transparancy for the background of a DIV while the text remains opaque?

I need to do it without using any library such as jQUery, etc. (But if you know of a library that does it I'd love to know so I can look at their code).

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marked as duplicate by kapa May 23 at 21:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 291 down vote accepted

Use rgba!

.alpha60 {
    /* Fallback for web browsers that don't support RGBa */
    background-color: rgb(0, 0, 0);
    /* RGBa with 0.6 opacity */
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.6);
    /* For IE 5.5 - 7*/
    filter:progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr=#99000000, endColorstr=#99000000);
    /* For IE 8*/
    -ms-filter: "progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(startColorstr=#99000000, endColorstr=#99000000)";
}

In addition to this, you have to declare background: transparent for IE web browsers, preferably served via conditional comments or similar!

via http://robertnyman.com/2010/01/11/css-background-transparency-without-affecting-child-elements-through-rgba-and-filters/

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cool! thank you –  fl00r May 4 '11 at 9:45
    
Is there any possibility that IE7 mode in IE9 is different from actual IE7? I'm asking because this code isn't working there. But if we use only three last rules (without background-color: rgb(0, 0, 0);) - all just fine –  Donotello Aug 26 '11 at 9:13
7  
I tried this solution and it did not work in IE8 because IE8 correctly applies the background color. I just took out the fallback for other browsers (which is what, old versions of firefox?). Explained here: stackoverflow.com/questions/4508191/… p.s. @Donotello ie7 mode in ie9 is definitely not is 100% accurate. I use a CMS that requires IE7/8 and the compatibility mode in IE9 breaks all sorts of things in it. –  robertpateii Oct 11 '11 at 20:18
1  
The linked article says that for IE (version 8, at least), you need to conditionally set background:transparent as well. –  Blazemonger Mar 21 '13 at 15:02
    
@Blazemonger thanks man! –  ausbin Mar 21 '13 at 20:59

I use an alpha-transparent PNG for that:

div.semi-transparent {
  background: url('semi-transparent.png');
}

For IE6, you'd need to use a PNG fix (1, 2), though.

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18  
Pure CSS > Background Images –  Marcy Sutton Mar 9 '12 at 21:27
6  
@MarcySutton IMO not always, definitely not. If you look at the answer marked as the answer, you'd understand why. How many hours should we waste for cross-browser compatibility. So, when you absolutely can, (sure, not always) you can use background images. Like I said, JMO. –  its_me May 8 '12 at 13:39
1  
The PNG fix 1 is awesome! The accept answer's method does not work on my IE6. –  Fabrício Matté Jul 10 '12 at 6:41
    
@Fabricio - Nor should transparent PNGs on IE6 ... right? –  Crungmungus Nov 19 '13 at 11:52
    
@Crungmungus there are many JS hacks/polyfills (see links below the code in the answer) and even a CSS method to fix PNG transparency in IE6. Though, in more complex use cases they tend to break one way or another so I've gave up on IE6 PNG transparency several months ago. –  Fabrício Matté Nov 19 '13 at 15:47

I've created that effect on my blog Landman Code.

What I did was:

<div id="Header">
  <div class="Background">
    <h1>Title</h1>
    <h2>Subtitle</h2>
  </div>
  <div class"Foreground">
    <h1>Title</h1>
    <h2>Subtitle</h2>
  </div>
</div

than use the following css:

#Header
{
   position: relative;
}
#Header H1
{
   font-size: 3em;
   color: #00FF00;
}
#Header H2
{
   font-size: 1.5em;
   color: #FFFF00;
}
#Header .Background
{
   background: #557700;
   filter: alpha(opacity=30);
   filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.Alpha(opacity=30);
   opacity:0.3;
   -moz-opacity: 0.30; 
   zoom: 1;
}
#Header .Background *
{
   visibility: hidden; // hide the faded text
}
#Header .Foreground
{
   position: absolute; // position on top of the background div
   left: 0; 
   top: 0;
}

The important thing that every padding/margin and content must be the same in both the .Background as .Foreground.

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Great! This is the solution I was looking for. I could not just set background color with rgba as done in the accepted answer, because I need to use a background image. I also don't have possibility to change the image itself to semi-transparent png, because it is thumbnails from an image gallery. –  awe Oct 29 '12 at 10:33

Relaxing your requirement to work on IE6 and legacy browsers you can use ::before and display: inline-block

div
{
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;    
}
div::before
{
  content: "";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  z-index: -1;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background:red;
  opacity: .2;
}

Demo at http://jsfiddle.net/KVyFH/172/

It will work on any modern browser

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This will put the "transparent background" in the foreground! If the opacity is only 0.2, you will probably not notice if all foreground context is dark colour. But it will be a problem if the main content contains interactive functionality like a href link or something. –  awe Oct 24 '12 at 8:54
    
@awe yes thanks, z-index: -1; was missing –  brillout.com Oct 24 '12 at 11:35
    
Great. Now it works perfectly! –  awe Oct 29 '12 at 10:38
    
won't work with overflow. jsfiddle.net/KVyFH/256 –  TomSawyer Dec 19 '12 at 14:40

Thanks @davy-landmann for http://stackoverflow.com/a/638064/417153. That's what I was looking for! Same effect with LESS code:

  @searchResultMinHeight = 200px;
  .searchResult {
    min-height: @searchResultMinHeight;

    position: relative;
    .innerTrans {
      background: white;
      .opacity(0.5);
      min-height: @searchResultMinHeight;
    }
    .innerBody {
      padding: 0.5em;
      position: absolute;
      top: 0;
    }
  }
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protected by Yi Jiang Nov 8 '11 at 15:58

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