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I am trying to serialize a .NET TimeSpan object to XML and it is not working. A quick google has suggested that while TimeSpan is serializable, the XmlCustomFormatter does not provide methods to convert TimeSpan objects to and from XML.

One suggested approach was to ignore the TimeSpan for serialization, and instead serialize the result of TimeSpan.Ticks (and use new TimeSpan(ticks) for deserialization). An example of this follows:

[Serializable]
public class MyClass
{
    // Local Variable
    private TimeSpan m_TimeSinceLastEvent;

    // Public Property - XmlIgnore as it doesn't serialize anyway
    [XmlIgnore]
    public TimeSpan TimeSinceLastEvent
    {
        get { return m_TimeSinceLastEvent; }
        set { m_TimeSinceLastEvent = value; }
    }

    // Pretend property for serialization
    [XmlElement("TimeSinceLastEvent")]
    public long TimeSinceLastEventTicks
    {
        get { return m_TimeSinceLastEvent.Ticks; }
        set { m_TimeSinceLastEvent = new TimeSpan(value); }
    }
}

While this appears to work in my brief testing - is this the best way to achieve this?

Is there a better way to serialize a TimeSpan to and from XML?

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2  
Rory MacLeod's answer below is actually the way Microsoft recommends doing this. –  Jeff Jun 8 '12 at 17:23
    
I would not use long ticks for TimeSpand because XML's duration type is the exact match. The issue was raised to Microsoft in year 2008 but never resolved. There is a workaround documented back then: kennethxu.blogspot.com/2008/09/… –  Kenneth Xu Sep 3 '13 at 1:52

12 Answers 12

up vote 42 down vote accepted

The way you've already posted is probably the cleanest. If you don't like the extra property, you could implement IXmlSerializable, but then you have to do everything, which largely defeats the point. I'd happily use the approach you've posted; it is (for example) efficient (no complex parsing etc), culture independent, unambiguous, and timestamp-type numbers are easily and commonly understood.

As an aside, I often add:

[Browsable(false), EditorBrowsable(EditorBrowsableState.Never)]

This just hides it in the UI and in referencing dlls, to avoid confusion.

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4  
+1 Awesome attribute addition. –  Walter Feb 17 '10 at 18:50
4  
Doing everything isn't so bad if you implement the interface on a struct that wraps System.TimeSpan, rather than implementing it on MyClass. Then you only have to change the type on your MyClass.TimeSinceLastEvent property –  phoog Dec 8 '10 at 20:52

This is only a slight modification on the approach suggested in the question, but this Microsoft Connect issue recommends using a property for serialization like this:

[XmlIgnore]
public TimeSpan TimeSinceLastEvent
{
    get { return m_TimeSinceLastEvent; }
    set { m_TimeSinceLastEvent = value; }
}

// XmlSerializer does not support TimeSpan, so use this property for 
// serialization instead.
[Browsable(false)]
[XmlElement(DataType="duration", ElementName="TimeSinceLastEvent")]
public string TimeSinceLastEventString
{
    get 
    { 
        return XmlConvert.ToString(TimeSinceLastEvent); 
    }
    set 
    { 
        TimeSinceLastEvent = string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ?
            TimeSpan.Zero : XmlConvert.ToTimeSpan(value); 
    }
}

This would serialize a TimeSpan of 0:02:45 as:

<TimeSinceLastEvent>PT2M45S</TimeSinceLastEvent>

Alternatively, the DataContractSerializer supports TimeSpan.

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8  
+1 for XmlConvert.ToTimeSpan(). It handles ISO standard duration syntax for timespan like PT2H15M, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601#Durations –  yzorg Mar 8 '12 at 23:28
2  
Correct me if I'm wrong, but the serlized TimeSpan "PT2M45S" is 00:02:45, not 2:45:00. –  tomp Jul 4 '13 at 7:48
    
@tomp You're right. I've fixed in now. Thanks. –  Rory MacLeod Jul 21 '13 at 15:59

Something that can work in some cases is to give your public property a backing field, which is a TimeSpan, but the public property is exposed as a string.

eg:

protected TimeSpan myTimeout;
public string MyTimeout 
{ 
    get { return myTimeout.ToString(); } 
    set { myTimeout = TimeSpan.Parse(value); }
}

This is ok if the property value is used mostly w/in the containing class or inheriting classes and is loaded from xml configuration.

The other proposed solutions are better if you want the public property to be a usable TimeSpan value for other classes.

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By far the easiest solution. I have come up with exactly the same thing and it works like a charm. Easy to implement and understand. –  wpfwannabe Sep 27 '11 at 10:06
    
This is the best solution here. It serializes very good!!! Thank you for you input friend! –  Clark Kent Nov 28 '11 at 13:20

A more readable option woul be to serialize as a string and use the TimeSpan.Parse method to deserialize it. You could do the same as in your example but using TimeSpan.ToString() in the getter and TimeSpan.Parse(value) in the setter.

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You could create a light wrapper around the TimeSpan struct:

namespace My.XmlSerialization
{
    public struct TimeSpan : IXmlSerializable
    {
        private System.TimeSpan _value;

        public static implicit operator TimeSpan(System.TimeSpan value)
        {
            return new TimeSpan { _value = value };
        }

        public static implicit operator System.TimeSpan(TimeSpan value)
        {
            return value._value;
        }

        public XmlSchema GetSchema()
        {
            return null;
        }

        public void ReadXml(XmlReader reader)
        {
            _value = System.TimeSpan.Parse(reader.ReadContentAsString());
        }

        public void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
        {
            writer.WriteValue(_value.ToString());
        }
    }
}

Sample serialized result:

<Entry>
  <StartTime>2010-12-06T08:45:12.5</StartTime>
  <Duration>2.08:29:35.2500000</Duration>
</Entry>
share|improve this answer
    
any idea how to make the output as XmlAttribute? –  ala Nov 24 '11 at 1:16
    
@ala, If I understand your question correctly, the answer is to apply the XmlAttributeAttribute to the property you want to express as an attribute. That is not particular to TimeSpan, of course. –  phoog Nov 24 '11 at 2:58
    
+1 Nice, except I would not serialize it as string but the Ticks as long. –  ChrisWue Jan 17 '13 at 20:11
    
@ChrisWue In my office we use xml serialization when we want human-readable output; serializing a timespan as a long isn't quite compatible with that goal. If you use xml serialization for a different reason, of course, serializing the ticks might make more sense. –  phoog Jan 18 '13 at 15:26

Combining an answer from Color serialization and this original solution (which is great by itself) I got this solution:

[XmlElement(Type = typeof(XmlTimeSpan))]
public TimeSpan TimeSinceLastEvent { get; set; }

where XmlTimeSpan class is like this:

public class XmlTimeSpan
{
    private const long TICKS_PER_MS = TimeSpan.TicksPerMillisecond;

    private TimeSpan m_value = TimeSpan.Zero;

    public XmlTimeSpan() { }
    public XmlTimeSpan(TimeSpan source) { m_value = source; }

    public static implicit operator TimeSpan?(XmlTimeSpan o)
    {
        return o == null ? default(TimeSpan?) : o.m_value;
    }

    public static implicit operator XmlTimeSpan(TimeSpan? o)
    {
        return o == null ? null : new XmlTimeSpan(o.Value);
    }

    public static implicit operator TimeSpan(XmlTimeSpan o)
    {
        return o == null ? default(TimeSpan) : o.m_value;
    }

    public static implicit operator XmlTimeSpan(TimeSpan o)
    {
        return o == default(TimeSpan) ? null : new XmlTimeSpan(o);
    }

    [XmlText]
    public long Default
    {
        get { return m_value.Ticks / TICKS_PER_MS; }
        set { m_value = new TimeSpan(value * TICKS_PER_MS); }
    }
}
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Another option would be to serialize it using the SoapFormatter class rather than the XmlSerializer class.

The resulting XML file looks a little different...some "SOAP"-prefixed tags, etc...but it can do it.

Here's what SoapFormatter serialized a timespan of 20 hours and 28 minutes serialized to:

< myTimeSpan > P0Y0M0DT20H28M0S < /myTimeSpan >

To use SOAPFormatter class, need to add reference to System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Soap and use the namespace of the same name.

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This is how it serializes in .net 4.0 –  Kirk Broadhurst Jun 8 '10 at 0:27

Can't comment or rank up, but the comment SoapDuration

[XmlElement, Type=SoapDuration]
public TimeSpan TimeSinceLastEvent

or

public SoapDuration TimeSinceLastEventTicks
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Like Rory said : DataContractSerializer gets the job done in the cleanest way possible.

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For data contract serialization I use the following.

  • Keeping the serialized property private keeps the public interface clean.
  • Using the public property name for serialization keeps the XML clean.
Public Property Duration As TimeSpan

<DataMember(Name:="Duration")>
Private Property DurationString As String
    Get
        Return Duration.ToString
    End Get
    Set(value As String)
        Duration = TimeSpan.Parse(value)
    End Set
End Property
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My version of the solution :)

[DataMember, XmlIgnore]
public TimeSpan MyTimeoutValue { get; set; }
[DataMember]
public string MyTimeout
{
    get { return MyTimeoutValue.ToString(); }
    set { MyTimeoutValue = TimeSpan.Parse(value); }
}

Edit: assuming it is nullable...

[DataMember, XmlIgnore]
public TimeSpan? MyTimeoutValue { get; set; }
[DataMember]
public string MyTimeout
{
    get 
    {
        if (MyTimeoutValue != null)
            return MyTimeoutValue.ToString();
        return null;
    }
    set 
    {
        TimeSpan outValue;
        if (TimeSpan.TryParse(value, out outValue))
            MyTimeoutValue = outValue;
        else
            MyTimeoutValue = null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Try this :

//Don't Serialize Time Span object.
        [XmlIgnore]
        public TimeSpan m_timeSpan;
//Instead serialize (long)Ticks and instantiate Timespan at time of deserialization.
        public long m_TimeSpanTicks
        {
            get { return m_timeSpan.Ticks; }
            set { m_timeSpan = new TimeSpan(value); }
        }
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