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Say I have two different cpp files. Both declare classes with the same name, but perhaps a totally different structure (or perhaps the same structure, different implementation). The classes do not appear in the header files. (As an example, suppose they are Node classes for different list classes.)

I've seen these classes conflict. Is this expected by the standard? What solutions are there to this problem?

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5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The standard way around this problem is to wrap the classes in different namespaces.

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2  
Alternatively, use nested classes: List<T>::Node and Tree<T>::Node are pretty obvious names, and neither Node pollutes anyone else's namespace. –  Jon Purdy Jun 17 '11 at 0:36
3  
You can even use anonymous namespaces. –  Matthieu M. Jun 17 '11 at 7:11
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I'm not sure if I'm missing some detail here, but you wrap each class in a namespace.

namespace A {
    class Node { };
}

namespace B {
    class Node { };
}

Then you can use A::Node or B::Node.

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You can use namespace to have multiple classes with same name by sub-scoping them in different namespaces. See: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/namespaces/

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It violates One Definition Rule. It's hard for compiler to detect the error, because they are in different compilation units. And even linker cannot detect all errors.

See an example in http://www.cplusplus.com/forum/general/32010/ . My compiler and linker (g++ 4.2.1) can build the final executable without any error, but the output is wrong.

If I change the example a bit, I get segmentation fault.

// main.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include <list>
using namespace std;

struct Handler
{
    Handler() : d(10, 1.234) {}
    list<double> d;
};

extern void test_func();

int main(void)
{
    Handler h;
    cout << h.d.back() << endl;
    test_func();
    return 0;
}
// test.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

struct Handler
{
    Handler() : d("test Handler")  {}
    string d;
};

void test_func()
{
    Handler h;
    cout << h.d << endl;
}

It's recommended to differentiate you class by namespace. For example of Node, you can use nest class and define the Node in the parent list class. Or you can add you class in anonymous namespace. See How can a type that is used only in one compilation unit, violate the One Definition Rule?

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I've seen these classes conflict. Is this expected by the standard?

The standard says you can't do that. It would violate the one definition rule. (How to fix this has already been covered in other answers)

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I might be interpreting incorrectly, but doesn't the standard say at 3.2.5 There can be more than one definition of a class type.. provided that each definition appears in a different translation unit, ...satisfy the following requirements..., Since the question says that the classes are in their own .cpp files that would mean that (barring any preprocessor things) they are in different translation units and therefore the compiling fails because the requirements are not met, but there can also be an scenario where there's no breaking of the ODR (when all the conditions are met). –  lccarrasco Jun 16 '11 at 23:50
    
@Lccarrasco: The first requirement on that list is "each definition of D shall consist of the same sequence of tokens", which means that there may be only one definition. It's duplicated in multiple translation units, but there is a single definition. If that differs between translation units you've broken the rule. –  Billy ONeal Jun 16 '11 at 23:56
1  
@Lccarrasco: That's there basically so that you can define a class in a header file (which is the usual place to define a class anyway). –  Billy ONeal Jun 16 '11 at 23:57
    
I see, I didn't understand that part completely, thanks :) –  lccarrasco Jun 17 '11 at 0:01
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