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I'm running into an issue where ReadToEnd is throwing an OutOfMemory exception when trying to read a 16MB text file in an ASP.net website.

While investigating the cause I came across File.ReadAllText which is really what I'm doing, I don't care about how I get the text.

But looking at the documentation of ReadAllText it doesn't mention the possibility of an OutOfMemory exception. Why is that? Is it implemented differently than ReadToEnd in such a way that its less likely to run out of memory, or does it throw some other exception if it runs out of memory?

Edit Adding code just to show what I'm currently doing:

StreamReader inputFile = System.IO.File.OpenText(filename);
string cacheData = inputFile.ReadToEnd();
inputFile.Close();

And sometimes I get OutOfMemory exception on line 2. No parsing going on, the file is only 16M of text, nothing strange that I know of.

Restarting IIS generally fixes it. But I have like 2G of RAM free when I get the error, IIS maybe hitting some internal limit? The w3wp.exe process usually uses 350-500M (This is IIS 6 on Windows Server 2003)

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Can we see your code? –  minitech Jun 16 '11 at 22:45
1  
A lot of code can throw OutOfMemoryException, not just ReadAllText... –  Tomas Voracek Jun 16 '11 at 22:46
1  
@minitech: Why? This isn't a question about his code. –  spender Jun 16 '11 at 22:48
    
gasp... could it be possible that not all exceptions are documented? –  juharr Jun 16 '11 at 22:50
1  
@spender: I just want to see if he's doing it incorrectly; reading a 16MB file shouldn't cause a computer to become out of memory, usually. –  minitech Jun 16 '11 at 22:52
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

From Reflector, System.IO.File class:

public static string ReadAllText(string path, Encoding encoding)
{
    using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(path, encoding))
    {
        return reader.ReadToEnd();
    }
}

Just like that.

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This is probably obvious, but just to summarize this answer: both will throw or not throw exceptions identically, given identical parameters. –  J Coombs Apr 15 at 18:59
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ReadAllText throws an OutOfMemory exception if you attempt to read a file that contains too much text to fit into memory - have just tried it.

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The OutOfMemory exception from ReadToEnd happens so infrequently that I'm not able to re-create it in my code yet. The question is more about why one documents OutOfMemory as a possible exception but the other doesn't, are they implemented similarly (does ReadAllText call ReadToEnd?) –  thelsdj Jun 16 '11 at 22:51
    
@thelsdj - as Tomas states above, a lot of calls can generate an OutOfMemoryException. MS probably decided against documenting each and every case where this can occur. –  Will A Jun 16 '11 at 22:56
1  
@thelsdj: documentation is, believe it or not, sometimes wrong or incomplete. –  Joe Jun 16 '11 at 22:58
1  
In fact OutOfMemoryException could be thrown potentially absolutely from any line of your code. Probably except rare guarded regions (like finally blocks). For example when JIT-compiler tries to process your method - it could go out of memory. You just can't predict it. –  Ivan Danilov Jun 16 '11 at 23:02
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I ran into the same problem with a C# Windows Forms Application. Building my application with the target platform set to 64 bit solved this problem.

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This post does a good job of explaining why I was having the original OutOfMemory error. IIS 6.0 on 32 bit Windows Server 2003 could only use about 600-700M of memory, even though I had 4GB.

Adding /3GB to boot.ini and rebooting the server made the error go away (even though my IIS memory usage doesn't appear to go much above what it originally was).

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