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Well I've searched a lot for a solution to this. I'm looking for a clean and simple way to prevent the callback method of a System.Threading.Timer from being invoked after I've stopped it.

I can't seem to find any, and this has led me, on occassion, to resort to the dreaded thread-thread.sleep-thread.abort combo shudders.

Can it be done using lock? Please help me find a good way to do this. Thanks

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1  
The after is not your real problem. Stopping it while the callback runs is the hard case. Which is quite possible. Use a lock. –  Hans Passant Jun 16 '11 at 23:37
    
Well, while not a big problem it still should be checked and handled. Otherwise callback could try to use some resources that were already freed or assuming that they were never called again etc. I have seen many times strange errors on application exit caused by incorrect assumptions in the callbacks. –  Ivan Danilov Jun 17 '11 at 1:34
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8 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

like Conrad Frix suggested you should use the System.Timers.Timer class instead, like:

private System.Timers.Timer _timer = new System.Timers.Timer();
private volatile bool _requestStop = false;

public constructor()
{
    _timer.Interval = 100;
    _timer.Elapsed += OnTimerElapsed;
    _timer.AutoReset = false;
    _timer.Start();
}

private void OnTimerElapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
{
    // do work....
    if (!_requestStop)
    {
        _timer.Start();//restart the timer
    }
}

private void Stop()
{
    _requestStop = true;
    _timer.Stop();
}

private void Start()
{
    _requestStop = false;
    _timer.Start();
}
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Thanks. I tried this an it appears to be working. I can't help but feel that there's a race condition in there somewhere, but in practice it hasn't failed. Can someone else comment on this? –  JayPea Jun 17 '11 at 20:51
    
@JayPea: you are welcome, I am using this pattern very often and I have tested it and there is no race condition within it. for more information about race condition check this on stack over flow –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jun 18 '11 at 0:01
    
What is the reason of putting AutoReset = false and then doing _timer.Stop() in the Elapsed-method? Wouldn't AutoReset=true accomplish the same thing? –  Kyberias Sep 2 '11 at 19:14
1  
The reason I'm confused about this answer is that it does not seem to solve the problem. The caller of Stop() here still cannot be sure that the "do work" part is not executed after the Stop() call. And I believe that was the original question/problem. –  Kyberias Sep 2 '11 at 19:36
1  
+1 for volatile. –  shakthi May 7 at 9:48
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An easier solution might to be to set the Timer never to resume; the method Timer.Change can take values for dueTime and period that instruct the timer never to restart:

this.Timer.Change(Timeout.Infinite, Timeout.Infinite);

Whilst changing to use System.Timers.Timer might be a "better" solution, there are always going to be times when that's not practical; just using Timeout.Infinite should suffice.

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For what it's worth, we use this pattern quite a bit:

// set up timer
Timer timer = new Timer(...);
...

// stop timer
timer.Dispose();
timer = null;
...

// timer callback
{
  if (timer != null)
  {
    ..
  }
}
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6  
this would not be a thread safe because (1) the timer = null could be updated from a thread and the call back thread still see the old value of it. (2) if you use the timer instance inside the timer call back after the "if (timer != null)" check; it could be null because another thread call the stop method and make it null. I really don't recommend this pattern unless you do something for thread safe like lock... –  Jalal Aldeen Saa'd Jun 17 '11 at 2:05
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For the System.Threading.Timer one can do the following (Will also protect the callback-method from working on a disposed timer - ObjectDisposedException):

class TimerHelper : IDisposable
{
    private System.Threading.Timer _timer;
    private readonly object _threadLock = new object();

    public event Action<Timer,object> TimerEvent;

    public void Start(TimeSpan timerInterval, bool triggerAtStart = false, object state = null)
    {
        Stop();
        _timer = new System.Threading.Timer(Timer_Elapsed, state, System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite, System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite);
        if (triggerAtStart)
            _timer.Change(TimeSpan.FromTicks(0), timerInterval);
        else
            _timer.Change(timerInterval, timerInterval);
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        // Wait for timer queue to be emptied, before we continue (Timer threads should have left the callback method given)
        // - http://woowaabob.blogspot.dk/2010/05/properly-disposing-systemthreadingtimer.html
        // - http://blogs.msdn.com/b/danielvl/archive/2011/02/18/disposing-system-threading-timer.aspx
        lock (_threadLock)
        {
            if (_timer != null)
            {
                WaitHandle waitHandle = new AutoResetEvent(false);
                _timer.Dispose(waitHandle);
                WaitHandle.WaitAll(new[] { waitHandle }, TimeSpan.FromMinutes(2));
                _timer = null;
            }
        }
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Stop();
        TimerEvent = null;
    }

    void Timer_Elapsed(object state)
    {
        // Ensure that we don't have multiple timers active at the same time
        // - Also prevents ObjectDisposedException when using Timer-object inside this method
        // - Maybe consider to use _timer.Change(interval, Timeout.Infinite) (AutoReset = false)
        if (Monitor.TryEnter(_threadLock))
        {
            if (_timer==null)
                return;

            try
            {
                Action<Timer, object> timerEvent = TimerEvent;
                if (timerEvent != null)
                {
                    timerEvent(_timer, state);
                }
            }
            finally
            {
                Monitor.Exit(_threadLock);
            }
        }
    }
}

This is how one can use it:

void StartTimer()
{
    TimerHelper _timerHelper = new TimerHelper();
    _timerHelper.TimerEvent += (timer,state) => Timer_Elapsed();
    _timerHelper.Start(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));
    System.Threading.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(12));
    _timerHelper.Stop();
}

void Timer_Elapsed()
{
   // Do what you want to do
}
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Perhaps you should do the opposite. Use system.timers.timer, set the AutoReset to false and only Start it when you want to

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The MSDN Docs suggest that you use the Dispose(WaitHandle) method to stop the timer + be informed when callbacks will no longer be invoked.

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You can't guarantee that your code that supposed to stop the timer will execute before timer event invocation. For example, suppose on time moment 0 you initialized timer to call event when time moment 5 comes. Then on time moment 3 you decided that you no longer needed the call. And called method you want to write here. Then while method was JIT-ted comes time moment 4 and OS decides that your thread exhaust its time slice and switch. And timer will invoke the event no matter how you try - your code just won't have a chance to run in worst case scenario.

That's why it is safer to provide some logic in the event handler. Maybe some ManualResetEvent that will be Reset as soon as you no longer needed event invocation. So you Dispose the timer, and then set the ManualResetEvent. And in the timer event handler first thing you do is test ManualResetEvent. If it is in reset state - just return immediately. Thus you can effectively guard against undesired execution of some code.

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why don't you propose a solution that is self-contained? –  agent-j Jun 17 '11 at 0:52
1  
Self-contained solution exists and it is called Timer. It just needs to be used correctly. –  Ivan Danilov Jun 17 '11 at 1:27
    
I am suggesting that since it is possible to use Timer incorrectly, why not create a reusable class that CANNOT be used incorrectly in this regard. The class can contain the complexity so you don't have to worry about it. –  agent-j Jun 17 '11 at 1:29
    
In fact I can't think almost any synchronization instrument that couldn't be used incorrectly at all. I don't try to propose solution except timer because as a general-purpose tool it is as simple as I can imagine. Why to make something more complex and error-prone? I don't think it will simplify anything. –  Ivan Danilov Jun 17 '11 at 1:38
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You can stop a timer by creating a class like this and calling it from, for example, your callback method:

public class InvalidWaitHandle : WaitHandle
{
    public IntPtr Handle
    {
        get { return InvalidHandle; }
        set { throw new InvalidOperationException(); }
    }
}

Instantiating timer:

_t = new Timer(DisplayTimerCallback, TBlockTimerDisplay, 0, 1000);

Then inside callback method:

if (_secondsElapsed > 80)
{
    _t.Dispose(new InvalidWaitHandle());
}
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